#1
what key are they chords f# major, a major and e major in

really need to know for a song my guitarist made of my band.

thanks
scott
#3
it's mostly in B major, but there are A#'s in the F# Major chord and A Natural's in the A Major chord.
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#4
None that I know of, sounds more like a key change or borrowed chord to me. The F# would have to be minor to fit the progression into the A major scale, so I'm guessing it's a borrowed chord. Can be a bit hard to tell also without knowing what the arrangement looks like.
Last edited by Ascendant at Jun 10, 2011,
#6
Quote by hames jetfield
not in the same key


So...It's still in F# major. just because a piece uses chromatic harmony doesn't mean it's not in a key. If anything altering chords and using chord from outside the diatonic scale can strengthen the sense of a tonic.
#7
There are no simple minor/major keys in which all of these chords occur...
But what I suppose is he used these chords on a blues scale, which would mean this progression is probably in F#Blues (this might be wrong). This means the song would either be in A or in F#

Anyway, F# Blues will always sound right

Hope this helped
#8
Quote by griffRG7321
So...It's still in F# major. just because a piece uses chromatic harmony doesn't mean it's not in a key. If anything altering chords and using chord from outside the diatonic scale can strengthen the sense of a tonic.

you quoted me before I deleted my post...FFFFFUUUUUUUU
#10
Quote by scott-1996
what key are they chords f# major, a major and e major in

really need to know for a song my guitarist made of my band.

thanks
scott


In terms of diatonic harmony, none.

It all depends what it resolves to. You most likely will have to carefully think through your melodies (think triad tones) and solos unless you are going for a weird outside sound.

If these are only power chords, resolving on the F# I'd call it F#m as a key. If it's an F# major, you have to be careful with a lot of note clashes playing in F# Major.

Best,

Sean
#11
I'd say E major
I know the F# should be a minor chord, but it's not totally uncommon to switch the ii to major.
Of course it's hard to tell from these chords only, I would need to hear the other instruments as well, but it resolves nicely to E I think.

Edit: I played it as F# A E E
Last edited by intothe at Jun 10, 2011,
#12
Without hearing where the resolution occurs, this could theoretically argued all three ways:

A major: altered vi to VI, typical V -I cadence.
A - F# - E
I - VI - V

E major: altered ii to II, plagal cadence.
E - F# - A
I - II - IV

F# major: borrowed bIII and bVII from parallel minor, subtonic - tonic cadence.
F# - A - E
I - bIII - bVII

Hell, it could even be in B major/minor if it resolves to B/Bm at the start of the next phrase. You have to listen for resolution to know the key.
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#13
Quote by Tabforlife
There are no simple minor/major keys in which all of these chords occur...
But what I suppose is he used these chords on a blues scale, which would mean this progression is probably in F#Blues (this might be wrong). This means the song would either be in A or in F#

Anyway, F# Blues will always sound right

Hope this helped


You are right. It's F# blues scale but every chord is just a major. That's pretty common. It gives the song a cool sound. (I mean that the chord in the scale should be a minor but it's just played as a major, hope you understand what I'm talking about.)
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#14
You are right. It's F# blues scale but every chord is just a major. That's pretty common. It gives the song a cool sound. (I mean that the chord in the scale should be a minor but it's just played as a major, hope you understand what I'm talking about.


Yeah, that's what I actually ment. It's like in the White Stripes "Blue Orchid". I played it in my band and I assumed it would be this way...