#3
TS is a musical genius.
Quote by Athabasca
My ex did the same. Cheated on me and then acted like I'd given her sister a facial. Women are retarded.
#8
James Blunt - You're Beautiful ? Same beat as you posted and the chords would sound similar at best.
#9
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
Your post was the only bright spot in this disgusting piece of thread.

Quote by lexanirider78
You have balls. I like balls....(awkward silence)

Quote by SeveralSpecies
I waited for the rape.

...


...but the rape never came
#10
good work.
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#15
TS, no matter how hard you try you will never write any combination of 2 to 8 chords that has never been used before.
Dont get so hung up on whats been done before by other people. There are plenty of bands who use the same progressions over and over but make them into different songs through melody and arrangement. If you can make a song out of a progression of just A and C, then do it. Forget about other people.
#17
Oooo, your in a bit of a pickle now aren't you? I'll try and help you if you tell me if adding in after the A and C a C# Chord rings a bell.
#18
Quote by guy_tebache
TS, no matter how hard you try you will never write any combination of 2 to 8 chords that has never been used before.


not true. it's actually a common misconception, the whole "only so many combinations, it's eventually going to be the same."

take a combination of 5 notes, for example. they can be any of the 7 notes in C major. 5 notes with seven possibilities each, that gives us 7^5, which is 16,807.

now obviously the majority will sound bad, but even 1% gives you 168 decent combinations.

now make that 8 notes. that makes 7^8, which is 5,764,801 combinations. if we take 1% again, that's still 57,648 decent 8 note combinations.

the same applies with chords, but we have more than just 7 chords using only natural notes in a particular key.

now if we use major/minor chords, 7th chords, and sus4 chords, using only naturals we get 21 chords. so 5 random chords would be 21^5, which is 4,084,101 possible combinations. make it 8 chords, and that's 21^8, which is 37,822,859,361 possible chord progressions with just those 21 chords. even if one in a million sound good, you've still got 37,823 good ones left.

now we can include accidentals. now let's add in a sus4, 6th, 9th, 11th, 13th, and diminished. we'll only use one kind of each extended chord, so that gives us 10 chords and 12 notes, so 120 possible chords. so 3 random chords would be 120^3, which is 1,728,000 combinations. make it 5, and it's 24,883,200,000 different possible progressions. 8 chords would give us 358,318,080,000,000 possible chord progressions.

now take into account that there are more than one possible 7th, 9th, 11th, and 13th chords. say there are 25 options to choose for each of the 12 notes. that's 300 choices. 3 chords would be 300^3, or 27,000,000. 5 chords would be 2,430,000,000,000 possible chord progressions. 8 chords would be 65,610,000,000,000,000,000 possible random chord progressions.

and we could add many more chords, including inversions, add chords, /chords and everything else, and we could have at least 100 different chords. let's say 100 choices, 12 notes, 1200 chords. 3 random chords gives us 1,728,000,000 combinations. 5 gives us 2,488,320,000,000,000 progressions. 8 chords would be 4,299,816,960,000,000,000,000,000 possible chord progressions. even if you take one out of every trillion, you still have 4,299,816,960,000 combinations.

and there are still more chords we can make, but i think i have made my point. while there may be a theoretical limit on the number of 8 chord progressions, humans will most likely never use every single one. we have not even scratched the surface yet.

note that my calculations may have gotten messed up while transferring them, but you still get the idea.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#19
Quote by theogonia777
not true. it's actually a common misconception, the whole "only so many combinations, it's eventually going to be the same."

take a combination of 5 notes, for example. they can be any of the 7 notes in C major. 5 notes with seven possibilities each, that gives us 7^5, which is 16,807.

now obviously the majority will sound bad, but even 1% gives you 168 decent combinations.

now make that 8 notes. that makes 7^8, which is 5,764,801 combinations. if we take 1% again, that's still 57,648 decent 8 note combinations.

the same applies with chords, but we have more than just 7 chords using only natural notes in a particular key.

now if we use major/minor chords, 7th chords, and sus4 chords, using only naturals we get 21 chords. so 5 random chords would be 21^5, which is 4,084,101 possible combinations. make it 8 chords, and that's 21^8, which is 37,822,859,361 possible chord progressions with just those 21 chords. even if one in a million sound good, you've still got 37,823 good ones left.

now we can include accidentals. now let's add in a sus4, 6th, 9th, 11th, 13th, and diminished. we'll only use one kind of each extended chord, so that gives us 10 chords and 12 notes, so 120 possible chords. so 3 random chords would be 120^3, which is 1,728,000 combinations. make it 5, and it's 24,883,200,000 different possible progressions. 8 chords would give us 358,318,080,000,000 possible chord progressions.

now take into account that there are more than one possible 7th, 9th, 11th, and 13th chords. say there are 25 options to choose for each of the 12 notes. that's 300 choices. 3 chords would be 300^3, or 27,000,000. 5 chords would be 2,430,000,000,000 possible chord progressions. 8 chords would be 65,610,000,000,000,000,000 possible random chord progressions.

and we could add many more chords, including inversions, add chords, /chords and everything else, and we could have at least 100 different chords. let's say 100 choices, 12 notes, 1200 chords. 3 random chords gives us 1,728,000,000 combinations. 5 gives us 2,488,320,000,000,000 progressions. 8 chords would be 4,299,816,960,000,000,000,000,000 possible chord progressions. even if you take one out of every trillion, you still have 4,299,816,960,000 combinations.

and there are still more chords we can make, but i think i have made my point. while there may be a theoretical limit on the number of 8 chord progressions, humans will most likely never use every single one. we have not even scratched the surface yet.

note that my calculations may have gotten messed up while transferring them, but you still get the idea.




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#23
Quote by StratoCatser




i'm gonna put that in a blog to preserve it for posterity. maybe put a link in my sig.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#24
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Oh ew no that doesnt sound like it, why what song would that be?


LOL I was just trying to find it but had no luck. Try this:

1) Learn the part of the song you remember
2) Ask everyone you know if they know what it is
3) If no one's heard of it, claim the riff as your own

Happy hunting!!!
#25
Quote by theogonia777
not true. it's actually a common misconception, the whole "only so many combinations, it's eventually going to be the same."

take a combination of 5 notes, for example. they can be any of the 7 notes in C major. 5 notes with seven possibilities each, that gives us 7^5, which is 16,807.

now obviously the majority will sound bad, but even 1% gives you 168 decent combinations.

now make that 8 notes. that makes 7^8, which is 5,764,801 combinations. if we take 1% again, that's still 57,648 decent 8 note combinations.

the same applies with chords, but we have more than just 7 chords using only natural notes in a particular key.

now if we use major/minor chords, 7th chords, and sus4 chords, using only naturals we get 21 chords. so 5 random chords would be 21^5, which is 4,084,101 possible combinations. make it 8 chords, and that's 21^8, which is 37,822,859,361 possible chord progressions with just those 21 chords. even if one in a million sound good, you've still got 37,823 good ones left.

now we can include accidentals. now let's add in a sus4, 6th, 9th, 11th, 13th, and diminished. we'll only use one kind of each extended chord, so that gives us 10 chords and 12 notes, so 120 possible chords. so 3 random chords would be 120^3, which is 1,728,000 combinations. make it 5, and it's 24,883,200,000 different possible progressions. 8 chords would give us 358,318,080,000,000 possible chord progressions.

now take into account that there are more than one possible 7th, 9th, 11th, and 13th chords. say there are 25 options to choose for each of the 12 notes. that's 300 choices. 3 chords would be 300^3, or 27,000,000. 5 chords would be 2,430,000,000,000 possible chord progressions. 8 chords would be 65,610,000,000,000,000,000 possible random chord progressions.

and we could add many more chords, including inversions, add chords, /chords and everything else, and we could have at least 100 different chords. let's say 100 choices, 12 notes, 1200 chords. 3 random chords gives us 1,728,000,000 combinations. 5 gives us 2,488,320,000,000,000 progressions. 8 chords would be 4,299,816,960,000,000,000,000,000 possible chord progressions. even if you take one out of every trillion, you still have 4,299,816,960,000 combinations.

and there are still more chords we can make, but i think i have made my point. while there may be a theoretical limit on the number of 8 chord progressions, humans will most likely never use every single one. we have not even scratched the surface yet.

note that my calculations may have gotten messed up while transferring them, but you still get the idea.


If there is an opposite to "Son I am dissapoint", I would/will post that.
Quote by Athabasca
My ex did the same. Cheated on me and then acted like I'd given her sister a facial. Women are retarded.
#26
Quote by Naruto00121
LOL I was just trying to find it but had no luck. Try this:

1) Learn the part of the song you remember
2) Ask everyone you know if they know what it is
3) If no one's heard of it, claim the riff as your own

Happy hunting!!!


Hmm I like you
#27
You're wrong, the C comes first, and the A comes second. And also, it's A minor, am I right? And it's not really C or A minor at all, because it's tuned a full step down. It's really A# and G minor. In which case, it's this song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2Leo9HSaGQ

If it isn't that song, too bad.
#28
Quote by Snowman388
If there is an opposite to "Son I am dissapoint", I would/will post that.


i added it as a blog, you could give that kudos i guess?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#29
Quote by jetfuel495
You're wrong, the C comes first, and the A comes second. And also, it's A minor, am I right? And it's not really C or A minor at all, because it's tuned a full step down. It's really A# and G minor. In which case, it's this song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2Leo9HSaGQ

If it isn't that song, too bad.

You're wrong too. It's actually a group of notes that I dont know the name of because I know absolutely no guitar theory whatsoever, other than EADGBE and names of other various tunings

Anyway, I'm pretty sure TS is looking for this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhGUu6NVXvk
Last edited by sam b at Jun 11, 2011,
#30
Quote by theogonia777
i'm gonna put that in a blog to preserve it for posterity. maybe put a link in my sig.

You deserve all the cookies in Middle Earth.


Also, this thread