#1
I'm in a two person band (both of us sing; both of us play guitar), and we want to start playing acoustic sets at small venues, such as coffeehouses. I just don't know what we need equipment wise. This is what I have listed so far:

2 Acoustic-electric guitars
2 TRS connectors
1 Four channel powered mixer
2 Dynamic cardioid mics
2 XLR connectors
2 PA speakers
1 Stage monitor

I'm pretty sure I've researched everything correctly, I'm just not sure whether a four channel powered mixer would suffice, or what kind of speakers we would need.

I could be completely off also.
#2
Maybe 2 DI boxes, in which case you would need another two XLR's (DI -> mixer).
Also a power cord for the mixer. It may come with one, but best to make sure.
Mic stands.
2 XLR's from your mixer to your speakers (1 per speaker).
Power cords if they are powered speakers (what you want).
Maybe speaker stands.
Power bar.
A good ear and knowledge of the equipment for soundchecking.

Remember, a huge part of the sound quality comes from the pickup in your guitar. The best PA system and the 'best' cables won't make a bad pickup sound good. Likewise, a great pickup won't sound great through a cheap PA system.

Where I am especially (Vancouver Island, Canada) pretty much all the coffee houses which do live music are going to have a PA system in their store available for use.
My current acoustic group:

Fiftieth Parallel

Martin Guitars
Elixer Strings
Acoustic amplification
BOSS pedals

#3
He won't need DI boxes for that. He should be able to run the guitars straight into the desk.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#4
Your pretty much on the ball.

Mic stands are important, you need active full range PA speakers and an analogue mixer. Or a powered mixer and passive PA speakers, (this way you have to make sure the speakers can handle the wattage from the mixer.).

Have a look into DB Technologies, Peavey, Mackie for speakers. Yamaha, peavey, mackie, allen & heath, soundcraft for mixers. I know mackie make a small 12 channel mixer (4 XLR inputs) that would be ideal, soundcraft make a nice 8 channel that isnt too pricey, allen and heath make a 6 channel. (Its always good to have a few spare channels, you never know.)

Make sure you have a few hundred watts total for some good headroom. You dont want to be overdriving anything.

Make sure you have lots of spare cables (XLR, mono).

Stage monitor is totally up to you, tbh, plenty of companies make decent ones, you wont need anything too powerfull for playing in cafes though.

As for mics get some sm58s or something.
Last edited by beckyjc at Jun 11, 2011,
#5
When I was doing acoustic sets I found I got enough monitoring just by angling one of the bins slightly towards the stage.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#6
If your in the US/Canada look at the Yamaha Stagepas 300 system it runs about $600 then all you need is 2 Shure SM58 mics $200, 2 Mic stands $60, 2 XLR cables $25. Plus your gonna want some speaker stands $60 so your looking at a little under a grand for the PA. Now you can get what you want, almost all of my PA was bought used and I have a $12,000+ (retail) PA, that cost me around $4,500. So Used is the way to go, go to the Pawn shops that deal mostly in music gear, if you got one near. Check your local CL/Kijiji
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#7
I'm confused. If you're playing a really small place you wouldn't need to mic up and if you're playing a big place, they should have a pa.
#8
I just think it would be cool to have everything on my own, or just make sure that wherever I went, I would have the equipment I need.
#9
i find that i never need to bring my pa system and i play an acoustic set almost every week.

i do have a yamaha 300 pa system, an extra powered speaker extension.
and a bunch of mics, stands and and recorders for practice.

you might want to get a nice setup like that, but expect to leave it all home most of the time.


also something that's great, and i get complemented on it all the time,
is an acoustic foot stomp, for bass taps. really adds to an acoustic set.
just dont cheap out on one if you decide to get one.

you want one will work when you play out.

edit:
im taking off for the day, but i just wanted to give you an idea about the
type of setup that works for a 2-3 person practice.


not pictured is the extension speaker, which is a 12". nice and big, so we
add it in, or line the bass right to it.

oh and i got a deal from MF, so the pa was on special and came wt the heavy duty stands, which really project the sound.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
Last edited by jj1565 at Jun 11, 2011,
#10
Honestly, I have a 200w keyboard amp that would do exactly what you want very well. It's effing loud, and it sounds great with vocals and acoustic guitars, I've done it. It has 4 inputs, so you'd be able to plug in 2 mics and 2 guitars with zero problem. However, it's quite limited on the EQs... Hartke makes one, mine's a Yorkville, Roland makes one as well... just a suggestion =)
#11
Quote by Darkflame
Honestly, I have a 200w keyboard amp that would do exactly what you want very well. It's effing loud, and it sounds great with vocals and acoustic guitars, I've done it. It has 4 inputs, so you'd be able to plug in 2 mics and 2 guitars with zero problem. However, it's quite limited on the EQs... Hartke makes one, mine's a Yorkville, Roland makes one as well... just a suggestion =)



i know keyboard amps make good portable PAs.

but you get less wattage and usually less inputs and tweakability for the money that way.

if i had one, i'd use it.
but i wouldnt buy one for it over a pa system.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011