#1
I was talking to my friend about using a stereo output jack, and I was under the impression that you'd just be able to use a mono chord for it because typically Stereo => Mono, but not the other way around.

Anyways, I was wondering if I wired my guitar to be stereo, would it be able to use mono chords, or would I be stuck to stereo ones, unless of course I got 2 output jacks.
#2
What purpose would wiring your guitar in stereo serve? If you want to split it to 2 amps, you don't need to wire it in stereo, just get a Y cable or make a splitter box.
#3
Quote by littlephil
What purpose would wiring your guitar in stereo serve? If you want to split it to 2 amps, you don't need to wire it in stereo, just get a Y cable or make a splitter box.


Its cheap, ability to split between pickups rather than the whole guitar, bragging rights, etc...
Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 at Jun 11, 2011,
#4
For starters, chords and cords are two different things. Chords aren't described as being mono or stereo.
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#6
Quote by Lovecannon
For starters, chords and cords are two different things. Chords aren't described as being mono or stereo.


Thanks so much for pointing out a typo! Too bad you didn't answer the question i.e. the point of the thread.


Quote by supersac
well you can but youd be missing out on half the signal

I'm assuming the signal would be one of the pickups.

Wouldn't a mono cord get both? Or would I have to get some type of special mono/stereo chord.
#8


Heres a stereo jack, as you can see there are two rings (called the ring and tip), that allows for two seperate signals, and the ground connection (sleeve, which is the metal part of the jack). Left & Right when used as a stereo application.



Here's a mono jack, one black ring (the tip connection), allowing for only one signal and the ground connection.

Here's a mono jack socket that is in your guitar.



The long bit of metal will touch the tip connection, the rest of the socket will be grounded to the sleeve.

If you used a stereo cable in a mono jack socket only one side of the cable will be used.
#9
You COULD wire a guitar specially for stereo, maybe the OP has done this, Otherwise yeah, a stereo cable will make no difference at all.
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#10
my ZW Set EMG's come with a stereo output jack and that's just the way you have to set it up. A stereo output jack is included with the EMG Pickups;
it grounds the black battery wire to turn on the pickups when
the plug is inserted into the jack.
Your not trying to use 2 signals and run 2 separate cab's in stereo are you? you won't need a stereo cord just plug a mono cord it and play ur ass-off and don't stop untill it's time to get some sleep. If you have the right gear you can do all the stereo stuff with that. a mono cord will be everything you need. And don't hurt urself thinking about it to much. It'll give you a head ache. Happens to me all the time. I'm getting a head ache just writing this!!! hahahaha nooo JK its time to practice
Last edited by shredspillers at Jun 12, 2011,
#11
Emgs use a stereo jack to turn the preamp on and off, they still output a mono signal...

...same as any other guitar. Fixing a stereo output jack to a guitar doesn't change the fact that there's absolutely nothing in your guitars electronics that will create a stereo signal.

Short answer... Don't bother, it's a waste of time because it won't actually do anything
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#12
The Gibson Lucille's approach to this is to use two jacks. You can either use two cables, one for each pickup, or one cable for both. It's got two output jacks, so the second one is a switching jack that switches the output of the first to just one pickup.

It's a little awkward to run two cables sometimes, but it definitely works and it's not like BB is running around onstage. With a single jack, you'd need to have a switch to take it from stereo to mono. You could do it with a single jack and no switch if you modified the input jack on your amps, but that's not really a good solution.