#1
I thought this forum would be my best bet
If you are though, hows it working out for you?
What are you doing with it?
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#2
I was going to. Than I smartened up and went into mechanical engineering...

My uncle has been one since the mid 70's, and he loves it, but you have to have the aptitude for it. I don't, but i love cars, hence my choice.

Electrical engineering has also changed a fair bit over the years. what my uncle was doing back in the day is nothing like what he is doing now. In all fairness, this is common to most disciplines of engineering nowadays.
#3
I have just finished my apprenticeship in it, and just finishing off my hnc, hard work but well worth it if you get the right job
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#4
EE is a very broad topic, most will end up doing designing consumer goods, which is digital logic essentially, designing IC chips which is again digital for the most part but moreso the physical stuff. I'm looking to get into it this coming fall, but not certain which sect I'm heading for. Don't expect to be doing discrete audio stuff too much, that's kind of a niche job and is unlikely to be much of a growing field for young EEs.
#5
Well to be honest, I just want to be able to make guitar amps and effects

I want to start a line of amps and effects

perhaps electrical engineering isnt the right choice for what I want to use it for?
The illegality of cannabis is outrageous, an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight, sensitivity and fellowship so desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world.
- Carl Sagan
#6
No it's not, you can just about learn everything you could learn about guitar and amps, it'll take time. Geofex and some other sites have a good collection of information. Before thinking about making a business, you may be better off getting to understand of everything, designing a few things, and just testing stuff out. There is a massive amount of "boutique" companies out there, the odds of making it rich off of a small manned operation are incredibly slim.
#7
Im only 17 haha, Im not really thinking about the business of it right now, I just want to be able to make a great sounding amp from scratch with my own design

I would be happy if I could just make custom amps for people or whatever
The illegality of cannabis is outrageous, an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight, sensitivity and fellowship so desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world.
- Carl Sagan
Last edited by SKArface McDank at Jun 11, 2011,
#8
I'm an EE. Just graduated from college and started working. Work is interesting, I personally do a lot of work for power tools and battery packs. I specialized in IC design. The job market is kinda tight right now, but you have some time.

The upside to having an EE degree when it comes to guitar amps and what not is that I know a lot of other stuff that I've put into guitar circuits that a lot of people don't necessarily think about.

As far as the job though... and pay... I just bought a brand new car, pay rent on a place and put 600 in savings a month and I still have a lot of money left.
#9
what exactly do you do? It it just for one company?
The illegality of cannabis is outrageous, an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight, sensitivity and fellowship so desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world.
- Carl Sagan
#10
wow, this is exactly what i was wondering about. it seems like some EE work has a more scientific "lab" orientation to me. Am I mistaken? also, what are some good universities in california for EE other than UCSD (my hometown, I already know about it)?
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#11
I am an EE student. the classes are tough to take in california schools, but they're ok. I'm planning to go into utilities, like power companies that give your homes powers and such. I'm getting an internship probably next summer (screwed up this summer).


I build amplifiers and effect pedals; there are things i learned EE that helped me. however, you do NOT need to be an EE to build amps and effect pedals. you can build tube amplifiers easily by reading a few books (might be hard to understand if you have no background), pedals are somewhat similar. it's not mostly what goes into the amp, but how it responds, how it sounds. get to know the local guitar players, have some of them play your amps, and have them advertise for you.


i'm going to school in cal poly pomona (in san bernardino) in southern california. it's pretty good, it's supposed to be a "famous" engineering school, at least in so-cal.
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#12
I work for a company that does designs for multiple brands of tools so yes and no at the same time.

Since I just started I'm a bit farther along than what most people would be. I cut my teeth through interning with them for almost two years so they trust me a bit more with designs and other things than they might trust others that they had never worked with.

My current project is to design and program the circuit boards for a set of tools. I also have to do a lot of the up front testing to make sure that everything works. I also do a lot of testing on returned products, I've helped rework stuff before, supervise some testing, etc. Never a dull day where I work.

One fun upside to my job, I get to go to China in the near future.

With an EE degree you can do design work, you can be a test engineer, you can do field sales, and there are so many areas that you can work in.
#13
I'm doing a mechanical engineering degree and got 94 % in an electrical module test, does that count? Lol but seriously Engineering is a great degree to do, there are a lot of different jobs you can get as a graduate engineer and the starting salary is usually pretty good as well. Even if you just want to be able to build guitar amps it's a good thing to do because it will mean that you will have a great qualification to fall back on if building amps doesn't work out.
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#14
just being an electrical engineer doesnt really qualify you to build and design amps. most curriculums dont focus on audio stuff, or at least dont get to the level where i would feel comfortable designing an amp from scratch. taking a couple entry level classes and then reading a lot of stuff on your own is a better way to go if you just want to build amps and effects. you will end up doing the on your own stuff anyway.
basicly, being a EE doesnt qualify you to work on/build amps, and not being one doesnt mean you cant.

that said, its a great degree with a lot of applications. i love my job, and it isnt something i would have expected to be doing when i started my degree. heck, it isnt even something i would have expected to be doing when i graduated. the fact that i can read a schematic and troubleshoot my guitar gear doesnt hurt either
#15
I have an Associate's degree in Electromechanical technology, and worked my way into an engineering technician position after 12 years of building, repairing, and designing equipment. Engineers spend most of their time designing and calculating/modeling, whereas electronics engineering technicians do the hands-on work of building, testing, and re-design. To earn an Associate's degree, you still must learn the same fundamentals as an engineer, but don't get as deep into theory. I think if your goal is to design and build amps and effects, an Associate's degree would be more advantageous than a Bachelor's. Other advantages are less time to earn the degree, and lower tuition. If your amp building business doesn't work out, the degree will open doors for you in technological fields.
#16
Yeah, i'm doing EEE, would prefer to go into audio, but I don't mind.
As others have said, the ability to design/build amps and effects will be nice, although I'm aware the course doesn't cover everything.
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#17
Well as Im a electrical engineer I work with hv equipment like transformers, so I don't think that would help building amps, but in my hnc I have studied amps and what not. It wouldnt really help.

To be honest your best off learning from someone else about amps, or try find someone who will let yoi train with them
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Engl Fireball
Engl Slanted Cab
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Schecter C-1 FR Black
Ibanez GRG (on its way)

Pedals:
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#18
I'm going to an apprenticeship with Rolls Royce next year and i will choose between mechanical and electrical. I'm looking forward to it. Anyone like to share anything, that would be useful to this.
#19
My Dad's an EE, he went to college through the military, and started working for IBM, he started with robots and lasers, but since 1989 he's been working for a company within IBM his friend created and now he runs it. So in effect he hasn't used his degree for almost 25 years. He makes a killing doing what he does so he doesn't complain
#20
Quote by askrere
My Dad's an EE, he went to college through the military, and started working for IBM, he started with robots and lasers, but since 1989 he's been working for a company within IBM his friend created and now he runs it. So in effect he hasn't used his degree for almost 25 years. He makes a killing doing what he does so he doesn't complain


I don't think that's really the point though. Having a degree gives you the training and the credentials to get you into a job but it's the work experience that's all important from then on that gets you into bigger and higher places. I think that's just the case with most peoples' careers and not just your dad's.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#21
Quote by SKArface McDank
Well to be honest, I just want to be able to make guitar amps and effects

I want to start a line of amps and effects

perhaps electrical engineering isnt the right choice for what I want to use it for?


This is essentially why I declared EE as my major after 2 semester of ****ing around and not doing anything/not declaring a major. I've worked as an instrument repairmans apprentice for nearly a year now, and that's what made me decide on this. But I'd like to be more than a tech.. I'd love to do R&D for a major amp company, or start my own.
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#22
Quote by shaggydogJV
This is essentially why I declared EE as my major after 2 semester of ****ing around and not doing anything/not declaring a major. I've worked as an instrument repairmans apprentice for nearly a year now, and that's what made me decide on this. But I'd like to be more than a tech.. I'd love to do R&D for a major amp company, or start my own.


dude exactly. R&D
The illegality of cannabis is outrageous, an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight, sensitivity and fellowship so desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world.
- Carl Sagan
#23
Quote by eoinmorgan
wow, this is exactly what i was wondering about. it seems like some EE work has a more scientific "lab" orientation to me. Am I mistaken? also, what are some good universities in california for EE other than UCSD (my hometown, I already know about it)?


There are some good smaller specialty schools. My friend got his BA in electrical engineering in 3 years, but he had to bust ass to get it. Very tough courses. He landed a sweet job for Boeing.
#24
Quote by eddiehimself
I don't think that's really the point though. Having a degree gives you the training and the credentials to get you into a job but it's the work experience that's all important from then on that gets you into bigger and higher places. I think that's just the case with most peoples' careers and not just your dad's.


Yea for sure, a degree is just a "foot in the door"
#25
Quote by askrere
Yea for sure, a degree is just a "foot in the door"


That is barely the case anymore.

Having just a degree will barely get you anything today.

A degree and work experience in the field through an internship will get you a foot in the door. How hard you work at the internship will determine how far that door will open up when you get there. And you usually get limited to that specific place you worked, or other places in that field... if you can legally work for them.