#1
After considering it for a while, and taking the advice of many people on this forum, I have decided to finally sign up for vocal lessons.

At this point I'm pretty much a complete beginner and I want to sign vocals along with my guitar and not make people want to rip their ears out and dip them in acid.

I have recorded a few vocals of my beginning progress and hopefully I can hear a difference over time.

I wonder however, how long _on average_ does it take to start hearing noticeable results in a beginner's voice if I practice at least an hour daily and take a 30 minute lesson each week?

I'm very excited to see where this takes me. In the end, if I can't sing worth a damn even with practice, at least we'll find out now
Searching for the perfect gear is endless. Buying a better amp you may notice how shitty your guitar is and vice versa. I've spent thousands of dollars in pursuit of the perfect sound, which I'll never completely capture. -B. Corgan
#2
Depends entirely how and what you practice, which will affect what difference you hear. At first you should be going up and down scales, and trying to hit notes in chords by ear, not singing along to bands. That said, not more than 2 weeks really, and you should hear yourself getting easier to listen to.
#3
if you go from beginner to practicing an hour every day in any situation youre going to see instant improvement. and if you cant sing even after all that practice it just means that youre trying for the wrong thing. all im saying is that curt cobain did pretty good and i dont think hed ever be able to sing pop.
#4
it will vary person to person to nboticed skill increase

But i think you will be able to notice consistency with your vocals in only a few short weeks
cause you will start understanding what you should be doing with your body for optimum tone, notes and breathing

Best of luck
#5
Thanks for all the great replies.

This is encouraging. Right now I'm not happy with my voice, but I feel myself being able to hit and carry the notes quite a bit better already. I've had one lesson so far and we went up and down the scales in semi-tones. I have been practicing the semi-tone scales on my piano at home using the "AHH" sound which is what my teacher wants me to concentrate on right now.

When I sing, I sound pretty good to myself but I understand that I hear myself differently than what is actually being heard by others. So I decided to record myself using my headset. Well, I found out one thing pretty quickly - I'll need a professional mic to judge my singing because the headset mic doesn't seem to have a great range... like it cuts off all my deep tones so my voice sounds thin.

I'll keep you guys updated and let you know how I progress. Hopefully other "beginners" can follow my experiences in this thread.
Searching for the perfect gear is endless. Buying a better amp you may notice how shitty your guitar is and vice versa. I've spent thousands of dollars in pursuit of the perfect sound, which I'll never completely capture. -B. Corgan
#6
Just an update. I've been to three vocal lessons now and my confidence is really taking off with vocals.

I ended up purchasing a condenser mic and a USB interface for my computer so I can record myself using cubase LE 5. This has helped immensely.

My vocal teacher is great. I'm doing scales just like you said, working on the AHH (open A sound) and "AAA" (closed A) sounds. Going up and down the scales in semitones and working mostly the one C under middle C to middle G area.

My teacher wants me to do 30 minutes a day on technique and the anything after that can be practicing my songs as I see fit. He says it will take a while for my songs to catch up to my technique, but keep singing.

I do see improvement. I think a lot of the improvement is the confidence that I'm gaining. I now don't get as shy when singing in front of people, so that allows me to open up and feel more natural.

My hope is that by the end of the summer I can sing some songs in front of friends and sound "passable" doing it. By 2012 I'd like to be able to sing with power and sound "good" doing a few easier songs.

I'll keep you updated.
Searching for the perfect gear is endless. Buying a better amp you may notice how shitty your guitar is and vice versa. I've spent thousands of dollars in pursuit of the perfect sound, which I'll never completely capture. -B. Corgan
Last edited by binaryclock at Jun 25, 2011,
#7
You'll certainly progress a lot quicker than I have. I've had no formal training and it's probably taken a good 3 years or so for me to really feel good about my voice and my range.
#8
Thought I'd give everyone a weekly update. I've had my 4th vocal lesson now and I am still practicing scales. I do see improvement - mostly around the following:

1. improved tone holding (great improvement)
2. improved strength (great improvement)
3. improved ear (I'm starting to be able to pick out my own issues with my voice when played back on the mic.) (moderate improvement)

I am struggling with:

1. Finding my overall style/tone.
2. Improving my tone - My teacher tells me that I don't open my mouth enough and that flattens the sound. Over time new overtones will appear, but it is not know where the journey will take me since I am still too new to singing.
3. quick tone/note changes. I can hold the note/tone, but to change quickly back and forth is a bit of a challenge (singing agility) at this stage.

At this stage I am happy with the progress over the weeks but the more I sing, the more I notice that I don't like my overall tone. I listen to other people and think man their voice sounds clear and smooth and mine sounds like a buzz saw. I'm going to concentrate my efforts on developing my tone and see if I can bring some warm tones out and clean the voice up a bit. It seems though, the more air I use, the more rough the tone becomes.

I'm also starting to sing more with my throat and much more lose than when I first started. When doing this, my singing seems to feel much more agile and full. I notice that the lower notes seem to sound rougher, and if I concentrate on using my throat/diaphragm to push the air upwards, it cleans it up a bit.

Overall, the songs I've been concentrating on trying to sing have become easier, much cleaner, and better overall. I guess I'd like to be further ahead than I am after three weeks, but when I look back at my singing a month ago, I do see the progress which is very important.
Searching for the perfect gear is endless. Buying a better amp you may notice how shitty your guitar is and vice versa. I've spent thousands of dollars in pursuit of the perfect sound, which I'll never completely capture. -B. Corgan
Last edited by binaryclock at Jun 25, 2011,
#9
Quote by binaryclock
My teacher tells me that I don't open my mouth enough and that flattens the sound. ...

I'm also starting to sing more with my throat ....

I concentrate on using my throat/diaphragm to push the air upwards,


These statements worry me.

1. You want to lift the throat, not drop the jaw. When you drop your jaw, where do you feel tension? In your throat, right? That is the LAST place you want tension.

2. You want to sing with the throat as much out of the way as you can get it. Hence, lifting the throat. Singing from your throat is the greatest contributor to the "dammit, I got nodes" problem.

3. No, do NOT NOT NOT push the air upwards.

See this link here... fourth section titled "the hold of the breath." http://thebelcantotechnique.now-here-this.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=33&Itemid=35

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Thank you for your reply. I do understand in your quoted bel canto technique these things are considered bad.

My teacher tells me not to "drop my jaw" but to open my mouth because the notes I'm singing sound "flat" and "rounded." As soon as I opened my mouth more, I see what he meant.

The vocal teacher I have has a great voice and can sign like no other. His power is enough to blow your ear drums with his voice.

Since he seems to know what he's doing and has a great voice, I'm going to follow his direction and see where that takes me first even though it seems counter-productive to the technique that you endorse. While the technique may be better or more modern, I have learned through my many years in life that the Internet and the real world are two separate things. Tangible results in front of your face are better teachers than a website.

I will read over the belcantotechnique though in more depth. It seems interesting and I'm always open to new possibilities!

Thanks for your comments!
Searching for the perfect gear is endless. Buying a better amp you may notice how shitty your guitar is and vice versa. I've spent thousands of dollars in pursuit of the perfect sound, which I'll never completely capture. -B. Corgan
#11
Quote by binaryclock

Since he seems to know what he's doing and has a great voice,.... Tangible results in front of your face are better teachers than a website.


Fair enough.... how about this guy's advice, then?

http://www.brianvollmer.com/

Numerous gold and platinum albums, international tours, touring with the likes of Kiss....

Quote by binaryclock

I will read over the belcantotechnique though in more depth. It seems interesting and I'm always open to new possibilities!

Thanks for your comments!


No prob.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Figured I'd post an update.

My lessons of 30 minutes seemed to go past too quickly and were very rushed. I had so many ideas and wanted more time to explore vocal technique so I extended my lessons to 1 hour. This has made all the difference in the world.

My technique is coming along well. I can really see a difference from week to week. I'm starting to find out what I can sing well with my tone and what I can't sing well. I've also identified my weak spots such as going from A to Bb my voice switches from chest to head and sometimes I lose my pitch in that area.

Overall I'm happy with my progress. I'm practicing at least an hour a day with technical and songs and do see improvement.
Searching for the perfect gear is endless. Buying a better amp you may notice how shitty your guitar is and vice versa. I've spent thousands of dollars in pursuit of the perfect sound, which I'll never completely capture. -B. Corgan