#1
I have a rosewood fretboard and got that oil to put on it so it stays good. Now I just wanted to ask how you apply it? Should I take off the strings? Just explain to me how to do this, thanks.
#2
Take your strings off and apply it, if after a few mins there is none left do it again. Keep doing it till it won't soak in anymore then just wipe off and at the same time cleaning off the gumby dirt
Running through:

Engl Fireball
Engl Slanted Cab
Ibanez Xiphos
Schecter C-1 FR Black
Ibanez GRG (on its way)

Pedals:
Boss Noise Gate, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, Boss Tuner, Zakk Wylde Wah.
#3
nothing happens if you take off the stings? because I heard if you take off the strings, there is no tension on the neck and it damages your guitar. Thats why they say to change your strings one at a time.
#4
Depends on the gauge, and if you don't leave it too long it should be fine.

Also if you put lemon oil on with the strings it can damage the strings, but if your putting new ones on its fine
Running through:

Engl Fireball
Engl Slanted Cab
Ibanez Xiphos
Schecter C-1 FR Black
Ibanez GRG (on its way)

Pedals:
Boss Noise Gate, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, Boss Tuner, Zakk Wylde Wah.
#5
Quote by Unicronus
nothing happens if you take off the stings? because I heard if you take off the strings, there is no tension on the neck and it damages your guitar. Thats why they say to change your strings one at a time.


Well, you might have to adjust the truss-rod after removing the strings. BUT do not attempt doing this if you don't know what you are doing. Leave it to a professional.

Cheers
Guitars and basses:

Fender Blacktop Telecaster|Epiphone Junior SG|Ibanez Lawsuit Strat|anelectro '63|Eagle tele w/ P-90s|Duke LP-copy|Cort B2A bass|Ibanez AW-40TCS
#6
Quote by Unicronus
nothing happens if you take off the stings? because I heard if you take off the strings, there is no tension on the neck and it damages your guitar. Thats why they say to change your strings one at a time.


They are ignorant twats. Take all the strings off, put a dab of oil on a rag, rub it into the fretboard and use it to clean the frets. Then wipe off any remaining oil.
#7
@avenge the rage
I was afraid it would damage the strings

@Metal_Mesh
i cant bring the guitar to a professional to oil the fretboard
#8
What strings are you using and what guitar?
Running through:

Engl Fireball
Engl Slanted Cab
Ibanez Xiphos
Schecter C-1 FR Black
Ibanez GRG (on its way)

Pedals:
Boss Noise Gate, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, Boss Tuner, Zakk Wylde Wah.
#10
What gauge strings are they. I take 12's off mine and its usually fine. Just don't leave it too long
Running through:

Engl Fireball
Engl Slanted Cab
Ibanez Xiphos
Schecter C-1 FR Black
Ibanez GRG (on its way)

Pedals:
Boss Noise Gate, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, Boss Tuner, Zakk Wylde Wah.
#13
You should be fine with taking them all off, especially if it has been set up right
Running through:

Engl Fireball
Engl Slanted Cab
Ibanez Xiphos
Schecter C-1 FR Black
Ibanez GRG (on its way)

Pedals:
Boss Noise Gate, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, Boss Tuner, Zakk Wylde Wah.
#14
wow, there is a lot of fail here.

*do not keep applying oil until it doesn't soak in any more.

*a luthier once told me that using oils on rosewood fretboard actually makes it dry out faster in the long run. He builds guitars for a living so I believe him. I quit doing it to my guitars.

*maybe just use a damp cloth if it really needs to be cleaned.

*if it is really dirty you can use .0000 steel wool but consult someone before doing that. I've done it plenty of times. It polishes the frets real well too, but make sure you go with the grain and cover your pickups.

*GHS Fast Frets works great for cleaning strings.

*the amount of time your guitar would be without strings is not enough to damage it.

*I can't see how the gauge has much to do with it imo.

*if it is a stock guitar it probably has .09's on it now, maybe 10's. Just make sure you buy new strings (several packs) before you take off the old.

*if the stings are still in good shape I wouldn't do anything until you are ready to change them anyway.

#15
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
wow, there is a lot of fail here.

*do not keep applying oil until it doesn't soak in any more.

*a luthier once told me that using oils on rosewood fretboard actually makes it dry out faster in the long run. He builds guitars for a living so I believe him. I quit doing it to my guitars.

*maybe just use a damp cloth if it really needs to be cleaned.

*if it is really dirty you can use .0000 steel wool but consult someone before doing that. I've done it plenty of times. It polishes the frets real well too, but make sure you go with the grain and cover your pickups.

*GHS Fast Frets works great for cleaning strings.

*the amount of time your guitar would be without strings is not enough to damage it.

*I can't see how the gauge has much to do with it imo.

*if it is a stock guitar it probably has .09's on it now, maybe 10's. Just make sure you buy new strings (several packs) before you take off the old.

*if the stings are still in good shape I wouldn't do anything until you are ready to change them anyway.



ok thanks for the advice, im going to wait untill i change the strings, and you said oil isnt good for rosewood? how does that dry it up? Everyone has told me that if you have a rosewood fretboard you should use oil on it
#16
^ I used to think that too about the oil. I was using Dr Stringfellow Lemon Oil for Guitars pretty heavily for a while. It is great after it is first applied but it will actually make the board stickier over time and you will want to put more and more oil on it. Now I've got some 'hazing' on my strat's fretboard and based on other pics of I've seen - I'm convinced that the wood is drying out faster than it would normally.

It is like a drug. At first it is great but long term repeated use is bad.

And for God's sake don't use anything like Pledge or furniture polish on any part of a guitar.
#17
You SHOULD oil rosewood fretboards, but only very rarely. That's the key. Like, once every two years or something like that. Even then you only use a very tiny amount. The natural oils in your skin are all the rosewood needs to stay in good condition most of the time and if you give it a tiny bit of lemon oil every couple of years that helps kind of purify it a little. Saturating it with oil will make it expand and warp, or it can make it sag and warp a different way or dry up and crack. If you have naturally really, really dry skin then you may want to oil the board a tiny bit more than that, maybe once every 18 months or once a year, but that's it. And when I say dry skin I mean like super dry, the kind of skin where it's painful and you need a lot of moisturiser to stop your skin from cracking. Regular skin that doesn't need excessive care will be oily enough for rosewood. Also if you leave your guitar out of its case right next to a radiator or an air conditioner unit then that can mess with the fretboard more so that may need oiling a little more to recover but you should never be leaving your guitar in that condition in the first place.
#18
well i bought the gibson care kit and it came with a fretboard oil, the guy at the store told me you need oil for a rosewood fretboard, everyone seems to have different views on this, shouldnt there be one scientifically proven method of taking care of your rosewood fretboard?
#19
There's one thing we know for sure: don't trust what the guys in shops tell you. It's their job to get you to buy as much stuff as possible. It's good you've got such products but forget whatever the people in the shop told you. Only listen to players who aren't trying to get into your wallet and luthiers who have a lot of experience.
#20
a lot of guys think you need to oil a board all the time.

to be honest, more damage can be done from over oiling
than keeping a board on the dry side.

a small amount a couple times a year is more than fine.

and if you play the guitar a lot,
even better, because you naturally oil the board.

lastly, let me be clear here.

YOU WILL NOT HARM THE GUITAR BY TAKING ALL STRINGS OFF AT ONCE.

BUT

if you don't know how to set up a guitar. i still suggest that you swap one string at a time.

because when you release the tension on the neck, there is a greater chance that the guitar will need additional setup after.


anyone telling him otherwise can meet me every morning in the setup thread.
bright and early, to report for work.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#21
thanks
so from what I dunderstand, taking the strings off is fine but i will probably need to adjust the truss rod, also fretboard oil is not really usefull, so there is no point of oiling it. Am I correct?
thanks once again, I learned a lot from this thread
#22
I only gave you my opinion. My opinion on the oil is not the most popular one.

I change my strings pretty frequently and I loosen the strings first and then just cut them off one at time, do what I need to do, and then put the new ones on. Lube the nut slots. Tune up. Stretch em. Tune up. Stretch em. If you put them on correctly they will stay in tune longer. If after a bit you feel the intonation if off then follow the set-up procedures for your guitar.




Edit: and +1 to what Jenny said.
#23
^

Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011