#1
Me, my younger brother (I'll call him Chaz), and his best friend (let's say Brian) have been jamming together for about three years now. When we started, I played bass/guitar, Chaz played lead guitar, and Brian sang. It wasn't a real band or anything, just some dudes covering emo bands.

Since then, Chaz has become an amazing lead guitarist and I've started singing, quite well, so we started a band, just us two, with me as lead vocals/rhythm guitar and Chaz on lead guitar/backing vocals. Our sound is like alternative with some prog, post-rock, and grunge influences, a very strange sound, but we're excited about it.

Anyway, Brian took up drums over the years so we invited him to be our drummer. He agreed. However, he has been trying to take more and more vocals, starting with backing (which I was resistant to because he uses a cliche "emo voice" when he sings), then "joint lead vocals" with me (which I completely refused), and finally trying to get Chaz to kick ME out of the band so he could be rhythm guitarist/lead vocals.

After some talking, we kicked Brian out of the band about two months ago. Now, Brian wants desperately to be back in the band, promising we will stay on drums (despite the fact that within the past two months he has sold his drum kit for an acoustic-electric guitar). Chaz wants me to give him another chance, but I'm highly reluctant to agree to it.

Am I being cynical or do I have a right not to trust Brian to stay on drums this time?

Also, have any of you ever dealt with band mates who refuse to play their role in the band?
#3
yea, I've been in bands where guys wouldn't follow thier roles.

I've always been the lead guitarist, and song writer, but I've always allowed others to join in the process when they were interested.

however, I was once in a band with a drummer who wanted to write guitar parts for the band-however he couldn't play more than three chords, and one rhythm, AND he had an attitude about it.

we had to push on with him continuing to try to write songs-he was brutal, but he got the message.
Cream fan club member #11.
Last edited by P.B. at Jun 12, 2011,
#4
We do have access to a "band" drum set owned by my dad, so it wouldn't be immediately necessary for Brian to own a drum set if he were to come back to the band.

The real predicament here is the daunting task of finding a new drummer in our area. Around here, the music scene is completely comprised of punk and metal. All of the indie/ska bands (the only other local bands in the area) died out within the past few years.

So, finding a drummer near us who would be into our unusual sound could be *very* difficult. I'm just worried that if I don't "settle" for Brian, we may not find another drummer for years, and we would really like to start recording/gigging by next summer.

On top of that, Brian really is a good drummer. It's just a matter of lost trust after his previous stint in the band.
#5
Give him another go. Then, on your first practice together, make sure everyone in the band agrees on their roles. That way he can't bitch about it later, and your other bandmate should have your back.

G'luck
#6
Do you know how hard it is to find a drummer that's capable of doing backing vocals?

Just finding a drummer who can keep a steady beat is usualy the hardest part of putting a band together, but one that can do backing vocals is generaly something to covet.

Of course, his history of colluding to try and get you fired from the band creates a trust issue, but so long as you address this issue with him and make it quite clear that any repeats of his previous behaviour will result in you replacing him, then you should be OK.

After all, what have you got to lose?
You need a drummer, right? So if you end up having to fire him, you'll simply be in the same position you are now, nothing lost or gained. But if he sticks to his word and works out then everything's great.

But encourage him to do backing vocals while drumming, it'll help him feel like he's fulfilling a role that he obviously wants and may act like a compromise.
#7
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Do you know how hard it is to find a drummer that's capable of doing backing vocals?

Just finding a drummer who can keep a steady beat is usualy the hardest part of putting a band together, but one that can do backing vocals is generaly something to covet.

Of course, his history of colluding to try and get you fired from the band creates a trust issue, but so long as you address this issue with him and make it quite clear that any repeats of his previous behaviour will result in you replacing him, then you should be OK.

After all, what have you got to lose?
You need a drummer, right? So if you end up having to fire him, you'll simply be in the same position you are now, nothing lost or gained. But if he sticks to his word and works out then everything's great.

But encourage him to do backing vocals while drumming, it'll help him feel like he's fulfilling a role that he obviously wants and may act like a compromise.



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Backing vocals are a terribly underrated part of a song IMO. There is definitely an art to it so if he can figure out a way to do it and do it well it will be a great thing for your band, if he doesn't have that great of a voice encourage him to go to vocal lessons with you. Who knows maybe down the road you can find a singing bassist and have three piece harmonys running rampart through your songs. That's always nice