#1
Hi ,
I have an Ibanez S470 with a dimarzio X2n at the bridge and now i want to change the neck pickup.
Title says it all but does pickups effect each other ? Can the stock pickup at the neck effect the tone of the bridge pickup or wise versa ?
#2
I don't think so, except of course when you blend both pickups, try to find a good combo of pickups to have versatility and a great sound when you play in the middle position
#4
I've seen that Phil X removes the neck pickup on some of his guitars, because even when a pickup isn't heard, it's magnets still have a slight effect on the strings. It might be a mostly "mojo" thing, but the argument does make some sense. If that is the case, then the answer to your question would be "yes", but I think you should just mostly concern yourself with finding pickups that play well together when you're using them both at the same time.
#5
Find pickups that have close to the same output levels. Unless you have a guitar with seperate volume pots.
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#6
*Do pickups affect each other
Mind your grammar

Now..

Quote by Grif22
I've seen that Phil X removes the neck pickup on some of his guitars, because even when a pickup isn't heard, it's magnets still have a slight effect on the strings. It might be a mostly "mojo" thing, but the argument does make some sense. If that is the case, then the answer to your question would be "yes", but I think you should just mostly concern yourself with finding pickups that play well together when you're using them both at the same time.

Yes. The more pickups you have, the more magnetic force there is to pull on the strings, so both pickups need to be lowered a bit to reduce the total magnetic pull, which can negatively alter the guitar's intonation.

Quote by Koshman32
Find pickups that have close to the same output levels. Unless you have a guitar with seperate volume pots.

This is incorrect. The string vibrations are stronger (exponentially, I believe) closer to the neck than the ones closer to the bridge. Therefore, you need a higher output pickup in the bridge, and a lower output in the neck. This way, you aren't adding more midrange and low end to the neck position, making it muddy as there is already a significantly higher amount created by the vibration.
A lower output pickup will be more balanced in the neck pickup, when paired with a high output bridge pickup. And when in doubt, you can lower the neck pickup's height to create better balance.

I personally like using the neck pickup for cleans and leads when I have one available, so having the neck pickup a little higher boosts the signal for my cleans, so I can dial the cleans in cleaner without worrying about a volume drop. Then, with leads, it creates an extra volume boost and more compression to help the leads cut through.

No, pickups do not affect each others' tone, but they can both affect the vibration of the strings if not adjusted properly.
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#7
Thank you all for your replies....
And sorry for my English , I am not a native speaker.
#8
Pickups have a very small (noticeable) magnetic field.

Find something that is magnetic and hold it close to the pickup then move it away slowly, you will notice the force on the magnetic object you are holding will quickly die down.




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#9
Quote by Aaabii
Thank you all for your replies....
And sorry for my English , I am not a native speaker.

I was unaware But I like to help with it where I can. English is one of the hardest languages to learn.
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#10
Unless they are both single coils, no. The only tone that will be affected with two humbuckers, or a single and dual (humbucker) is when they are played together. If they are two single coils and the poles that are facing the strings are both north or both south, there is a good chance for six-cycle hum (pickup feedback). If they are opposite poles facing the strings, the microphonic feedback of one pickup produced will be cancelled, which is how humbuckers create the notes through an amp without any six-cycle hum.

There might be like Shinozoku said, a little difference with string pull, but not enough to make a huge difference, but it is hard to tell until it is said and done.

EDIT: In fact, I think that putting in a higher output pickup in wouldn't affect anything, unless it had much more powerful magnets. Output can be changed by copper winding around the magnets. This is why one of the pickups in a set can use the same kinds of material but still have a higher output than the other.
Last edited by fg-433s at Jun 14, 2011,