#3
many effects loops are buffered, this should make a tonal difference in that you don't get 'signal loss' but it does sound different (cuz you are getting more high mids and highs) and some people don't like it. it's a common complaint of guitarists when they switch to a new technique of routing their signal that limits 'loss of signal' from the cable (like buffers or wireless systems) and many times a tech will just introduce a 20' cord somewhere or remove the buffer and it 'fixes' the problem.

more people complain about the effects loop itself sucking tone, there are many mods out there that drop an effects loop out entirely because of this reason.
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#4
The only cables that would suck tone would be the ones that the guitar itself "sees." That would be every cable between your guitar and the first buffer in the signal chain. The first buffer might be the first pedal (many pedals are buffered in the bypass position). Or if you have all true-bypass pedals in fronot of the amp, the first buffer would be the amp itself. After that, such as at the FX loop, there is no real concern for signal degredation due to cable length. Unless the FX loop is poorly designed (hi-z source).
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#5
i wouldn't necessarily think of it as tone loss, rather than a change in tone. when my Promod had a tung sol in v1, i would purposely run a 20'-30' cable there just to lose that little bit of extra highs. IIRC i have heard of a few professional guitarists doing something similar.
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#6
There was a very informative post about cable length and tone "loss" a while ago, but I can't for the life of me remember who it was.

Anyway, basically what the deal is is that the more cable you have, the more highs you lose. To solve the problem, you can add highs back in via an EQ.

Someone please correct me if I remember incorrectly, or if there is more to add to that.
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#7
The posts so far make sense and It seems that its safe to say its not an outright no-no, thanks guys

I'm planning to run a nova system in the loop of one of the Marshall JVM combos with the nova controlling the amp via midi. I need to have at least a 20 foot snake so I was worried that I'd be in trouble. The nova has a good EQ so if its just a treble roll-off that's not a problem. I was concerned that it would make the rig sound thin or sterile.
#8
Quote by Offworld92
There was a very informative post about cable length and tone "loss" a while ago, but I can't for the life of me remember who it was.

Anyway, basically what the deal is is that the more cable you have, the more highs you lose. To solve the problem, you can add highs back in via an EQ.

Someone please correct me if I remember incorrectly, or if there is more to add to that.


its the capacitence in the cable that causes the loss of some presence (higher high). if it is buffered, the only place you really lose tone is between your guitar and your amp. if you add in a bunch of TB pedals, you will lose more and more of that presence as the length of cable increases and number of connections increases. so if you run a lot of pedals out front of the amp, it would be most beneficial to have/add a buffer towards the front of the lineup.

most effects loops are buffered from the factory, so you really don't have to worry a ton about it.

and really the only time you would notice the loss, would be running your guitar through the pedalboard with no buffers, and sticking the cable straight out in front of the amp.

it all can be eq'd out for the most part, you just tweak your tone around the loss of presence.

there are buffers you can buy for pretty cheap actually, i knew of one but can't think of the company that made it to save my life.

and again, one man's tone loss, is another mans tonal ecstasy.

like i stated a few posts up, i run a longer cable to my PM because it is a little to bright for me without it. does it make a huge difference? no. but it works for me.

also a few years back i owned an amp that had an unbuffered effects loop, but was really shrill, so what did i do? stick a 20 foot cable in the send and return, and it did exactly what i needed it to, it took out some of the shrill brightness.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#9
Don't forget the cheap coiled cords used back in the day to make some of the greatest music ever recorded...
Bruce Clement
BC Audio Hand Crafted Performance