#1
So I wrote a small riff and I cant figure out what scale it's in. I know it's root is B but other then that I'm lost. Can anyone help me out, I'm trying to solo over this.

e||-------------------------|------------------------|
B||-------------------------|------------------------|
G||------------------------|------------------------|
D||--4-4-4-4-2-2-2-2--|-----------------------|
A||--2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2--|--2-2-2-2-2-2-2-0-|
E||------------------------|--3-3-3-3-2-2-2-0-|

e||-------------------------|------------------------|
B||-------------------------|------------------------|
G||------------------------|------------------------|
D||--4-4-4-4-2-2-2-2--|--2-2-2-2-2-2-2-0-|
A||--2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2--|--3-3-3-3-5-5-5-0-|
E||------------------------|------------------------|


Thanks in advance!
2/17/08 Kosova's independence!!!
#2
All those notes are in G major or E minor. Play one of those scales. Hint: they have the same notes)
#3
Since it's one sharp note there (F#) and the root is B, then the scale is probably B phrygian.

Edit: Same notes as G major/E minor.
#4
Would the B phrygian scale fit?

Edit: opps lol beat me to it! thanks guys!
2/17/08 Kosova's independence!!!
#5
Quote by zbest
Would the B phrygian scale fit?

Edit: opps lol beat me to it! thanks guys!


It's not phyrgian/modal at all.

To determine what scale goes with a song, figure out the key. The first way you can do this is by figuring out the chords. Secondly you can figure out where it resolves.

Your chord progression goes like this:

B5 E5 G B5 A5

B5 E5 C Dsus2 D5

You say the root is B? I'd say the same, but only you could tell us. The most likely key then is B minor, as it shares all those notes, with the exception of the C. It's also possible that the key is D major, but only you could tell us which one it is (it can't be both).

So applying your knowledge of harmonised minor scales you find that the actual chord progression goes like;

Bm - Em - G - Bm - A
Bm - Em - C - Dsus2 - D

The C simply acts as a bII in the progression, an out-of-key chord. Over this chord you'll have to account for accidentals so it doesn't clash with the chord underneath.

Edit: Before someone gets clever with that CST stuff over the C chord, lets just make sure everybody understands how I figured out the above.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
See this is exactly why I asked lol. I knew that when I was soloing over it it seemed kind of off but I didn't know why(curse my limited theory knowledge!) and as i was messing around I noticed that the c# worked only sometimes, and now I'm sure thats why. I do think it is a minor scale so I'll try out the b minor. Thanks again!
2/17/08 Kosova's independence!!!
#8
Quote by Zen Skin
I dunno -- looks like it is G major/E minor


Of course you could play E Dorian flat 6






yeah i'd say G/Emin
#9
G major contains all those notes, and the relative minor of that is E minor, so that would be two of the scales I would use.

But if it resolves on B, then you should probably use B minor, with a bii.

For flair, G major and E minor could be used.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.