#1
Anybody have difficulties with guitar as a second instrument?

I'm a cellist, trombonist and singer of 19 years. I feel like the similarities between a guitar and a cello make me feel confident and I have little victories, yet I'm not really learning anything if that makes sense.

I've just been playing around with information availble on the internet and learning from a friend, however she learned through tabs so she doesn't really know how to read music or notes and it makes learning that much harder.

Any recommendations for a beginner who has the music theory/finger technique, but trouble with strumming, picking and techniques more guitar exclusive? I'm so used to learning an instruments inside and out, note for note, but the guitar is quite confusing....
#2
I would recommend the Mark John Sternal dvd's, there really great easy to read an learn.
#3
What if you're tight on money? Are there any good books that anyone recommends. I don't know if anyone knows of the Suzuki program, but when I went to music school they had a class for Suzuki guitar.

They used lots of drills and exercises, so if anyone knows anything like left hand/right hand drills. That would be GREAT
#5
What music would you like to play?

For anything heavyer i'd recommend books by Troy Stetina
Metal rhythm guitar vol. 1 and 2
Metal lead guitar
Fretboard mastery

(have "lead" book muself, good stuff, my teacher gave me few excersises from rhythm vol.1, i approve of that book too)

Might try some "rockhouse method" DVDs.Riffs and leads of various famous guitarists dissected and presented

My vote would still go to guitar teacher, since you know your theory and only need technique you might aswell find one to teach you that (Troy Stetina books and metronome)

Good luck
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#6
The one piece of advice I can give you is to not expect your experience with other instruments to translate to guitar. The cello is a vastly different animal being fretless and all and I expect the technical demands of both hands are quite different.

Just take it easy and don't expect overnight results, this is a new skill so you can't expect to just jump in and get it right because you've played something else with a fingerboard.

That being said, the recommendation for justinguitar.com is a very good one, Justin really knows his stuff and is a pretty damn good teacher as well.

If you hit any obstacles just come right back here and we'll do our best to help
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Jun 14, 2011,
#7
Whatever you do, don't learn from the Suzuki method for classical guitar...whoever designed that syllabus is a bloody twit who will (already has really) ruin a bunch of students that proper teachers will have to waste time correcting before they can get into the good stuff.


If you were taught well on cello, alot of the ideas about posture and using your body to play should transfer over well without too much trouble.

You haven't quite told us what style of music you'd like to get into really
#8
Actually, speaking of the Suzuki books.

I used to play violin, and I've been using my Violin Suzuki books for guitar practice, and I think it's been very helpful, viola and guitar are quite similar in some aspects.
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#9
Quote by Penn100
Actually, speaking of the Suzuki books.

I used to play violin, and I've been using my Violin Suzuki books for guitar practice, and I think it's been very helpful, viola and guitar are quite similar in some aspects.


In that they're made of wood and have strings yes but really nothing more than that...
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#10
Sorry everyone. I completely forgot to put that down. I'm a traveler, so I've lived in Japan and France for a while. I really like foreign music both mainstream and folk.

Most everything I listen to would fall under indie, R&B, folk, Blues, Funk, Ballad. Stuff like that. I mean, I would love to learn a few pops pieces too.

I've been looking at Justin's videos. I think he's really amazing. But I'm really having trouble figuring out where to start. His drills for out right beginners have a lot of music theory that isn't helpful to me (Like the "Name that Chord" ones). I'm wondering how to put things together to fit me.

With my left hand, I just practice fingering a few chords in succession slowly, and drill myself to do it 10 times perfect (then 20...etc), but strumming is really hard and I haven't found an real exercise for it yet..........

I plan on getting a teacher when school is back in session (or sneaking in to Guitar I as an Audit course). The school's private teacher is $40 bucks an hour, so I'll have to save for that if I need it.

Thanks for the suggestions so far every
#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
In that they're made of wood and have strings yes but really nothing more than that...

Well, both Shawn Lane and Paul Gilbert has reccomended translating violin pieces to the guitar fretboard, and I must say that when I've done it myself, it's been quite nice to play.
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#12
Quote by Penn100
Well, both Shawn Lane and Paul Gilbert has reccomended translating violin pieces to the guitar fretboard, and I must say that when I've done it myself, it's been quite nice to play.


They also both recommend transcribing piano pieces for guitar but you sure as hell wouldn't say they're similar at all.
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#13
For strumming, I advise learning funk rhythms and use chords instead any of the lead playing, also I find it helps to loosen up the picking hand when strumming. Also check some videos of live performances or watch a guitarist play at a cafe or pub or wherever else, and watch how they play.
#14
Quote by Penn100
Actually, speaking of the Suzuki books.

I used to play violin, and I've been using my Violin Suzuki books for guitar practice, and I think it's been very helpful, viola and guitar are quite similar in some aspects.



The ideas behind the Suzuki method are fantastic but the way the guitar syllabus is structured isn't.