#1
Hey pit! I have recently come in with Pro Tools 8 LE, and I feel way in over my head. I can get a VERY basic track out the door sounding okay, but I really want to strengthen my knowledge and skills when it comes to producing and mixing songs in Pro Tools. Such as, ways to effectively compress and EQ different instruments and voice types, as well as entire mixes and stuff like that.

Do you any of you know where I can get my hands on some really good educational material? Whether it be a book or books or videos or whatever. I'm sure strengthening knowledge in production is something that tons of UGers could benefit from. Maybe finally ditch audacity and get your hands dirty in a real DAW.

So anyway, any suggestions?
#2
The computer section at Borders or Barnes&Nobles used to have massive books on software like Pro Tools, Maya, AutoCAD, Mathematica, Visual Studio, etc.. but nowadays it's all "Macs for Dummies" or "How to Get Rich Quick on the Internet." Have you looked on Amazon?
i don't know why i feel so dry
#3
Lurk the Andy Sneap forums
I'LL PUNCH A DONKEY IN THE STREETS OF GALWAY
Last edited by whalepudding at Jun 14, 2011,
#4
It really helps to get to know their real world counterparts because DAWs such as Pro Tools, Digital Performer, and others are virtual representations made by people who are used to doing things the physical way. So if you don't understand physical signal routing, it's hard to wrap your head around some of the concepts to working with PT.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#5
I just took a Music Tech class at my school this past year and we used Mixing Audio by Roey Izhaki as a textbook...it's got great information on a lot of different levels.

As I understand it, Avid Technology does classes and corresponding certification for ProTools that might be worth looking into. Even if it costs money, the courses cover everything one needs to know about the program and would be a good investment. Also, if you plan on doing any professional work, the certifications are essentially necessary.

Edit: "Levels" pun totally unintended.