#1
I just bought a CD of an orchestral film score. The music's great, the sound not so. It's an archival score (1981) but I have many other scores from and before that time which sound better. It's bass-light, treble-heavy.

I want to do a home EQ job on it. My idea is to simply ramp up the bass frequencies and push down the trebles. I've experimented with doing this in Audacity and I can get the sound at least listenable. But there are 30-odd tracks and doing them one at a time will drive me nuts.

I'd like a more real-time facility than Audacity allows too, so I can adjust while listening, get it right, and then apply that EQ to the batch of files.

I've been looking on the internet but you know how it is. Google throws up some promising-sounding software. You look, nice screenshots, etc. You try to download it and it's "Before you download, do a free scan of your PC for errors", "DOWNLOAD NOW! (Google Chrome)" etc.

Has anyone done a similar task. I only want to know about products you've actually used. The batch processing thing is not essential. If I have to I'll go through it track-by-track.
#2
Download the reaper trial

search for EQ VST

open 1 track and put all songs on same track

EQ to liking and render as 1 whole song

open up MP3 or Wav (preferably wav) then cut up and re-render each song as a new track

this will take some time but at least you get the same result on all tracks!
#3
Rip the orchestra with FreeRip and then use audacity (Both free) to split and change the EQ settings on them. I've done this with an old Bach CD my dad had but instead of changing the EQ, I added a little reverb and echo to them and split it so I could put it on my Ipod.
#4
maybe just try mastering it? whack the file into some software and stick a multiband compressor on it, BOOM headshot!
#5
Quote by EatShreddies
maybe just try mastering it? whack the file into some software and stick a multiband compressor on it, BOOM headshot!

Classical music is all about the dynamic content of the pieces... why would you want to compress it further, beyond the compression used by the mix engineer and whoever mastered it? A little EQ is a much better choice in this situation.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#6
Quote by mr7string
Download the reaper trial

search for EQ VST

open 1 track and put all songs on same track

EQ to liking and render as 1 whole song

open up MP3 or Wav (preferably wav) then cut up and re-render each song as a new track

this will take some time but at least you get the same result on all tracks!


Best advice.
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#8
I finished it - track by track using Audacity. It's worked better than I expected, and faster because Audacity remembered the EQ settings from track to track.

It's now listenable.

I did try putting a vst plug in into Reaper but couldn't get it to work. Never done plug-ins on anything except Internet Explorer!
#10
Quote by FireHawk
yes. parametric EQs ftw! (especially Fruity Parametric EQ 2)



That's what I use

Love it how you can cut graphically
The symphonizer
#12
Quote by seanington
Itunes has an EQ. Use that.


This is actually the best idea if your just listening to it. Save the music players EQ for the song. About all music players have an EQ.