#1
So I was recording a mate the other day just for fun for the first time and when we were tracking drums he couldn't stay in time with the click. Up until now I've never had an issue as I've only ever tracked myself and I can stay in time just fine but I really didn't know how to go about tracking this guy. I ended up just recording it in freetime and did a quick hackjob to splice it together but I felt very amateur and dodgy while doing so. In the end nothing ended up being aligned and i couldn't punch in/out right on the beat obviously as im used to. Is this how you guys go about it? Just push through and spend an insane amount of time splicing later on?
#2
It's how they used to do it back in the 60's.

But then again back then the musicians could all play in time or all the instruments were recorded in a live session.
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#3
Had the same problem with my old band. Drummer couldn't keep in time at all with the click.

We ended up just recording his parts then us playing over him instead of trying to keep it all in perfect time.
So long as everyone plays along with the drums it's okay, right, to do it without a click. See how it sounds. So long as he's not too far out it should be okay. But i'm far from being an expert sorry
#4
Had a drummer like that as well... We had to max the headphone so he couldn't ignore the click anymore. Took him awhile, but he eventually had a decent track
#5
the only person i ever recorded without a metronome did it all in one take and the single take sounded good.

generally speaking if im recording someone and they can't play to a metronome then i won't record them unless they can play it through beginning to end.
Last edited by z4twenny at Jun 14, 2011,
#6
i've done it a bunch of times. i TRY to avoid it at all costs unless the band is hardcore/punk, then usually putting it to a click kinda kills the feel.

shit, once i tracked a metal band whose drummer couldn't play to a click to save his life, and i set up a tempo-map to his playing and slip-edited it to that map. haha
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#7
Record a scratch guitar track thats in time with the click and have him record to that.
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#9
Quote by theotherguy7145

So long as everyone plays along with the drums it's okay, right, to do it without a click. See how it sounds. So long as he's not too far out it should be okay. But i'm far from being an expert sorry


This is not a good way to go about it. Unless you like BPM variations...

There is no excuse in the modern day to not record to a click track (weather it be a kick or programmed drums in time to play over)
#10
the only time i would consider not recording to some type of click would be for a jam type band. you know the type, where they get evryone in the room and start doing lots of improv and lots of feeding off one another.

anything where things are tracked separately gets a click. it may be just a synth/mid version of the guitar part so the drummer feels like he is playing to something, but it has to be something with a perfect tempo. either that or a scratch guitar track to a click for your drummer to play to is what i would start with. if he cant play to that, well then he needs to learn how to stay in time...
#11
I heard of one engineer using a delay on the vocals for the drummer to stay in time. That gave them a little room to work with and gives it a more human sound, but with the delay set at a certain tempo, it kept them in time. If your singer isn't constantly singing, you could throw a delay on the snare or another drum. I'm no drummer, but when playing my guitar, I find it much more natural to play in time to a delay rather than a click. Just an idea that might be worth a try, but the absolute best thing to do is get your drummer to suck it up and learn to play to a click. That's a skill that EVERY drummer needs to have.
#12
Quote by FireHawk
This is not a good way to go about it. Unless you like BPM variations...

There is no excuse in the modern day to not record to a click track (weather it be a kick or programmed drums in time to play over)


Except that you may not need everything in a song to sound exactly on the click. If the band can keep time decently and just has a hard time playing to a metronome, you can still make a good recording. A recording isn't necessarily bad just because it's not spot on the timing all the time and depending on the band, if they can play well together, they can stretch or speed up passages to fit with phrasing.

A lot of rock, blues, alternative, and punk albums aren't recorded with a click (probably metal too, but with a lot of modern technical metal I'm sure it's harder). I'm not saying it isn't good to play to a metronome, I'm just saying that I don't think there is anything intrinsically wrong with not doing it if your band can keep time.


But yeah, as someone else said, if he's having problems doing it and can't keep time well, either get him to suck it up and learn how to play with it or record to a scratch track of guitar or bass that is on the click.
Last edited by Warrior47 at Jun 14, 2011,
#13
I don't see why everyone says a drummer HAS to be able to play to a click. A lot of great bands have recorded albums without clicks, including modern ones; it gives it a more realistic feel.
#14
Quote by herby190
I don't see why everyone says a drummer HAS to be able to play to a click. A lot of great bands have recorded albums without clicks, including modern ones; it gives it a more realistic feel.


It is the drummer's responsibility to give it that "realistic" feel; whether there is a click track or not shouldn't make a difference. Also, it is a drummer's job to keep time, and tie things together, so I'm not really understanding what you're trying to say. If a drummer can't play in time, they aren't much of a drummer.
#15
Quote by MaskedMurader23
It is the drummer's responsibility to give it that "realistic" feel; whether there is a click track or not shouldn't make a difference. Also, it is a drummer's job to keep time, and tie things together, so I'm not really understanding what you're trying to say. If a drummer can't play in time, they aren't much of a drummer.


+1 to this

listen to some live sublime, i love their music but alot of their live stuff sways horribly with the tempo and you can hear the band members falling in and out of time with each other. i enjoy it for what it is, but it doesn't sound very professional.
#16
Quote by MaskedMurader23
It is the drummer's responsibility to give it that "realistic" feel; whether there is a click track or not shouldn't make a difference. Also, it is a drummer's job to keep time, and tie things together, so I'm not really understanding what you're trying to say. If a drummer can't play in time, they aren't much of a drummer.
I understand what you're saying, but I think steady, minor changes in tempo (such as speeding up a little bit throughout a pre-chorus) can give a song more energy. I am a drummer, and although I'm capable of playing to a click, I hate doing it; I prefer to play with the bandmembers, and just play based on feel.
#17
Quote by herby190
I understand what you're saying, but I think steady, minor changes in tempo (such as speeding up a little bit throughout a pre-chorus) can give a song more energy. I am a drummer, and although I'm capable of playing to a click, I hate doing it; I prefer to play with the bandmembers, and just play based on feel.


This is very subjective man.
#18
Quote by herby190
I don't see why everyone says a drummer HAS to be able to play to a click. A lot of great bands have recorded albums without clicks, including modern ones; it gives it a more realistic feel.


I understand what you are saying, but I think the issue really is that most musicians who don't like to play to a click, don't like to do it because they have trouble doing it. If you master playing with great timing (which is achieved through practice with a metronome), than you can deviate.
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