#1
I know the title sounds nooby, but bear with me.

I'm asking on behalf of my bassist. He's just changed the volume pot on his Maverick (active pups), and now when the volume is turned all the way up, he cannot get a clean tone. He's tried changing the battery and resoldered any suspect connections too. Any ideas?
Jackson, Ibanez, Lag
Carvin, Marshall
Ibanez, Boss, Korg
#3
Yeah supersac has the right idea. The potentiometer was probably replaced with a different resistance value therefore over-driving the on-board preamp prematurely. Replace it with the same value as the original (should say something like 50K linear) or a similar label. This means that all the way closed, the pot is 0Ohms and it sweeps linearly until it's fully open at 50KOhms. Logarithmic pots called (Audio taper) don't linearly sweep. Half way closed could really be 40KOhms even if the fully open pot is 50KOhms. The resistance increases faster and faster as you turn the knob in these types.

Leave the electrical engineering to the bass designer as improperly replacing parts could cause problems. It can also be interesting to see what kind of sounds you can get out of replacing parts, but please understand the circuit before tampering! Good luck.
#4
I had an active maverick before. If it has an onboard EQ set all the knobs for that to the centre indent
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

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I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#5
ya lol, just make sure its got the same power and the same rate of change lol
may have been a waste of money time and effort, with more to come if he ended up getting the wrong one (kinda sounds like he did)

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#6
Ahhh I missed that he swapped the volume pot. Active pickups tend to use 25k pots whereas passive pickups tend to use 250k or 500k pots. Most shops will sell you a 500k or 250k without even thinking about it so check the values.
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#7
Well apparently it was doing it before he changed the pot. Any ideas?
Jackson, Ibanez, Lag
Carvin, Marshall
Ibanez, Boss, Korg
#8
the amp cant handle the pickups or the amp is blown id think. If its not the guitar then its the amp lol. If there is a high and low input on the amp make sure its in the low one, it cuts usually 10 or 15 db so that the amp doesnt distort like that. but this is a fairly recent thing i think. If his amp is more then roughly 10 years old, or just only has one input then its more then likely a high input that doesnt cut any volume and simply cant handle how powerfull the pickups are.
solution, turn the knob all the way down and slowly turn it up til it just starts to distort, and go down a bit from there so its not distorting. play like that.


and get a new amp that can handle it :P:P:P

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#9
Well the amp hasn't changed. It was running fine with that amp until recently - he changed the pot because he thought that's what the problem was. He's tested it through a couple of amps too, with the same results.
Jackson, Ibanez, Lag
Carvin, Marshall
Ibanez, Boss, Korg
#10
It's the on-board preamp if he is sure it's DEFINITELY not the pot or the wiring/soldering. Soldering can damage or destroy the fine components on the preamp if you aren't mindful of the heat transferring to it. Remember, most on-board preamps are composed of surface mount components, which can't handle much heat. If it sounds like driving an amp too hard into distortion, then it's likely the preamp. Be sure to check the pickups by attaching some test leads from one pickup to the amp as well as the other separately. If both pickups work individually going straight into the amplifier, then it's a preamp problem.