#1
Hi guys,

I'm trying to learn Over The Hills And Far Away by Led Zeppelin but I'm having trouble getting the "lick" fast enough in the very beginning. (3rd string 2nd fret to 4th string 4th fret).

I've found some speed building exercises online but they target changing chords and stuff...

How can I practice going faster all over the neck (like I would need to do in this song)?

ps: I really like this kind of songs, if you know any other like this one (not too advanced), let me know !
Last edited by Kristof_EG at Jun 15, 2011,
#2
1. metronome.
2. play any progression or lick which you want to play fast at 90bpm.
3. go up in jumps of 5bpm once you have it nailed at each bpm.
4. profit.
5. you sound good, bitches want you.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
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#3
Quote by Banjocal
1. metronome.
2. play any progression or lick which you want to play fast at 90bpm.
3. go up in jumps of 5bpm once you have it nailed at each bpm.
4. profit.
5. you sound good, bitches want you.


Agreed, with one modification: Instead of just bumping up 5 bpms each time, alternate jumping up 5, then coming back 2 (or so). What I find is that helps you concentrate on playing ON the beat, rather than just playing faster. Fast playing is kinda useless if you're rushing, I think you'll agree. . . I've found this technique makes for more consistent playing at speed.
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#4
Quote by Banjocal
1. metronome.
2. play any progression or lick which you want to play fast at 90bpm.
3. go up in jumps of 5bpm once you have it nailed at each bpm.
4. profit.
5. you sound good, bitches want you.


I was reading the first 4 and I was thinking to myself: "Hmm, yeah... well, maybe..."


But the 5th one really convinced me !!!

thanks for the advice :p
#5
Quote by gwitersnamps
Agreed, with one modification: Instead of just bumping up 5 bpms each time, alternate jumping up 5, then coming back 2 (or so). What I find is that helps you concentrate on playing ON the beat, rather than just playing faster. Fast playing is kinda useless if you're rushing, I think you'll agree. . . I've found this technique makes for more consistent playing at speed.

Actually, speaking of which, I remember seeing a video where the guy makes you speed up 30 bpm regardless of if you are sloppy, and then slow down by 20. that way, the jump up by 10 is less "noticed". I haven't tried it, but it might be worth a go.

EDIT: OP - slowing down is a pain in the ass, but trust me, your playing will be cleaner than...something very clean. 5bpm is highly meticulous. you could get away with 10bpm jumps.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Jun 15, 2011,
#6
like michael angelo batio says, "ya gotta play slow before you can play fast". practice it slow till you have it down, then speed it up a little and practice it till you have it down and so on.
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#7
Hammer that sucker on. Good amount of hammers and pull offs in that tune (though maybe not where you're talking about). Otherwise is just the usual practice practice practice.
Last edited by Spud Spudly at Jun 15, 2011,