#1
Hey people. I was wondering if anyone has experience with yamaha silent guitars? This is the official webpage for it.

http://www.yamaha.co.jp/english/product/guitar/silent_guitar/index.html

I was thinking of buying one so I could practise whenever I want to, and it seems like it could act like a really nice travel guitar too. I would definitely try it out before I buy one, but I want to hear some other opinions too. Thanks!
#2
How very interesting. I can't give you any suggestions, but I can tell you that I'm fairly interested. I would like to play on aswell, this looks like a wonderful guitar to just carry around, worry free.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#3
I have had one of the NYLON string silent Yamahas since 2006. Have taken it on many plane trips (work) and also play it all the time at home. I think it's a great guitar, has great sound and is well made, and would recommend it. BUT, since guitar likes and dislikes are so subjective, you really should try it before you buy it. I can't say anything about the steel string version since I haven't played one.
#4
That would be the one I go for to, a Steel Stringed one. I'm curious as to why its called a "silent guitar" though. . . Kind of a strange name for a guitar.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#5
Silent because it doesn't have any body to radiate sound. It's not absolutely silent, it makes a sound like an electric without an amp. It is intended to be used with headphones and also has an output for a 1/4" cable to go to an amp.
#6
How is this even possible to market? Just get an electric and play it unplugged.
This ends now, eat the goddamn beans!
#7
Quote by Skynyrd890
How is this even possible to market? Just get an electric and play it unplugged.


I've thought about this. Maybe I should just get a regular electric, but I would require an amp to hear myself. The silent guitar allows me to play with just regular headphones, and I would assume normal speakers too. Electric guitars arn't quite as portable as this one either. I'm not familiar with electrics, but could I plug in regular speakers or headphones into electric guitars?

I think in essence, the silent guitar is really an electric guitar made to produce an acoustic tone. It has built-in effects and a headphone jack.
#8
Quote by avenger86
I've thought about this. Maybe I should just get a regular electric, but I would require an amp to hear myself. The silent guitar allows me to play with just regular headphones, and I would assume normal speakers too. Electric guitars arn't quite as portable as this one either. I'm not familiar with electrics, but could I plug in regular speakers or headphones into electric guitars?

I think in essence, the silent guitar is really an electric guitar made to produce an acoustic tone. It has built-in effects and a headphone jack.



Yeah, you can plug your headphones into an electric guitar, but it wont get you much. The sound does pass through, at least with my active pickups it does, but there is no power, so the sound is not projected.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#9
Quote by avenger86
I've thought about this. Maybe I should just get a regular electric, but I would require an amp to hear myself. The silent guitar allows me to play with just regular headphones, and I would assume normal speakers too. Electric guitars arn't quite as portable as this one either. I'm not familiar with electrics, but could I plug in regular speakers or headphones into electric guitars?

I think in essence, the silent guitar is really an electric guitar made to produce an acoustic tone. It has built-in effects and a headphone jack.

Get yourself an acoustic model of , and any electric you please. Quiet, let's you plug in your own audio to play with, and let's you plug in headphones or speakers. Plus you can use it on any electric. Just my suggestion. Unless I'm missing something about the silent guitar.
This ends now, eat the goddamn beans!
#10
Skynyrd, I think there is something in what you're saying. The demo clip provided does sound great too. With this, I guess the only other advantage the silent guitar provides is simply portability. But then again, I know there are some really light electrics around.

Hmm......gotta think about this.
#11
I work at a corporate airport and a lot of the pilots flying in/out work 1 week on, 1 week off. I've seen countless pilots flying in with these guitars & they use them as essentially "travel" guitars. The one pilot I talked to loved his steel string one, because it was small enough to fit in the plane and quiet enough to play in his hotel room without disturbing anyone, a long with the fact that he didn't have to cart an amp around, he could just plug in his headphones. He also liked that it had a full scale fretboard. I got to play one briefly and it seemed well built, the owner did say that it stays in tune pretty well. I was going to get one for my travels, but never a got around to it. As a travel guitar, I think it's one of the best ones out there.
#12
Yeah. The big advantage of the Yamaha is that it has a full size fretboard but packs into a small enough bag for carry on to a plane. I got mine after going thru the nightmare of having to check my electric is a hard case as "oversize" luggage. The Yamaha tucks nicely into one of the overhead bins, even on the smaller planes. As pointed out, the other advantage it has over travelling with an electric is the built in amp and a feature that lets you plug an iPod or mp3 player in so you can play along.