#1
Hello. Recently I've been trying to record some songs I wrote, but I've already hit a mjor stumbling block in the guitar tone (drums sound pretty good though). I'm using one of those line 6 spider amps (I know its really not meant for recording, but its all I have available right now) being recorded by a shure sm57, and the distortion tone being receorded is just horrendous. Everything is very trebly and washy regardless of how I play with the dials, and the funny thing is that the amp doesn't sound that terrible when I'm standing in the room. When I get to listening to it on the computer though it has no definition.

I've tried using the pod before too, but I think the sound isn't very good on that either. What I'm basically trying to ask is if anybody knows any tricks for this kind of digital amp to raise the definition and get rid of hissing/washy sound. So far I've been placing the microphone in front of the right speaker about 6 inches away.

I'm recording into a Firestudio pro with cakewalk sonar, if that matters.
Any help is much appreciated, thanks in advance.
#2
Well to smooth out that distortion you can try one of two things, if not both. First mic position is the biggest factor of the frequencies captured. The closer the mic is placed to the center of the speaker the brighter it will be. So if you want to cut down on the harshness of the distortion move the mic toward the outside of the speaker.

Next you can try some post EQ. While this won't save your sound it can refine it to something better. So if you want less high end take down those higher frequencies.

I'm sure your mic placement is most of the problem. Although you don't have the best gear out there you still can get a semi decent sound.

EDIT: One thing that plays a role into how the sound comes out of the computer is an onboard EQ on the computer. If you have a relatively recent computer you probably got the REALTEK HD thing on it. Make sure that EQ is off. The speakers you have also play a role. Cheap ones have no definition and are pretty fuzzy. I got some logitech speakers that were 25 bucks and they have quite a bit a definition.

Hope that helps.
Last edited by Phat Stud 55 at Jun 15, 2011,
#3
1) Plug guitar directly into your fire studio
2) Get Free Amp Sims and Impulses
3) Load them on the track the dry guitar is going through
4) EQ Amp Sim with hardly and lows, very little medium, and highs up a bit
5) EQ that signal to get rid of crappy frequencies
6) Compress

There you go...don't use the amp...
#5
Thanks for all the helpful replies guys!!

I'm probably going to follow Firehawk's suggestion first. I was already thinking of trying something like that but my experiences with direct-in in the past weren't too great, although that was a while ago and I'm sure the technology is a lot better now.

If it don't work, I guess I'm just gonna have to spend some time fiddling with the mic positions and hope for the best.

Thanks again.
#6
Quote by Ayawatsuji
I'm probably going to follow Firehawk's suggestion first. I was already thinking of trying something like that but my experiences with direct-in in the past weren't too great, although that was a while ago and I'm sure the technology is a lot better now.


Define a while ago and how were you doing it? If you weren't using your interface for direct in and using the mic port, thats prob why. Also, a lot of amp sims don't sound as bad as before.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#7
Quote by lockwolf
Define a while ago and how were you doing it? If you weren't using your interface for direct in and using the mic port, thats prob why. Also, a lot of amp sims don't sound as bad as before.


Yeah in fact its very easy to get a great sound out of an amp sim if you use and interface, use impulses, know how to eq an amp good for recording (which is different than playing live) , and understand how to EQ into a mix.