#1
Hey UG'ers, I am a guitarist wanting to wander into the land of drums. I bought a sound percussion 5 pc drum set and was wondering if there were any resources online to help me learn drums. I am going to teach myself and need a bit of advise.

P.S: I did check the stickys..........we all hate it when someone asks something with the answer right there!(most people don't read those anyway)
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#2
Protip, if you want to seriously learn, get lessons, they will help a lot. If you only want to learn just to be able to play with your friends, you could get away with self-teaching, but if you're serious about it, then it'd be important to have a tutor to stop you from teaching yourself poor technique that'd be difficult to un-learn later, where it'd hold you back.

And again, if you're serious about it, you'll need to devote a fair amount of practice to a practice pad, to work on your rudiments: Your stick control, technique, etc. Any good drummer will agree that it helps immeasurably to split your practice about 50/50 between drums and pad. I usually just sit listening to podcasts for half an hour or so a day, working on my drum pad. I wouldn't try and devote your full attention to it, otherwise you'll get bored quickly xD

Besides that, I find it easiest just to look up various drum beats using GuitarPro files on UG. If I ever hear anything cool, I'll track it down on here, examine the drum tab, then learn it. There are probably a few other good websites for that kinda thing, too.

Anyways, welcome to the world of hitting things with sticks to make lound noises
Rotten Playground
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#3
the freedrumlessons website is a good starting point. The guy who runs and does most of the videos (Jared Falk) also does live lessons too so it's worth a look. I think the site has changed to drumlessons.com or something like that, not sure.
Neo Evil11
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#4
^Freedrumlessons is still up, but it's not regularly updated. Drumlessons.com has a lot more specific stuff these days. Both are phenomenal resources.
Quote by HeretiK538
Protip, if you want to seriously learn, get lessons, they will help a lot. If you only want to learn just to be able to play with your friends, you could get away with self-teaching, but if you're serious about it, then it'd be important to have a tutor to stop you from teaching yourself poor technique that'd be difficult to un-learn later, where it'd hold you back.
I don't agree entirely with this-- yeah, a knowledgeable teacher that will point you in the right direction is very useful early on, for the reasons that you outlined. But it's definitely not necessary for developing genuine skill, I'm pretty sure if the dude had any questions regarding technique anybody on this forum would be able to help him out. Jojo Mayer, Todd Sucherman and Bobby Jarzombek are all entirely self-taught, for example.

I'm not saying lessons are bad or anything, but not essential. With the internet, as well as drum books, DVDs and etc. all the knowledge in the world is available, really.
#5
Hey man, start off learning the basics. I would suggest checking out Drummerworld Drum Clinic for some really good video lessons. The stuff in the drum clinic is all free and you can also order dvds & drum books that will help out.
#7
Steve makes a fair point, beyond getting your feet, lessons aren't that important. It just relies on you making sure you're practicing right. I know a fair few drummers who don't practice right (or, indeed, at all) and the difference is notable
Rotten Playground
Listen to me and Jameh muck about on a podcast
as if you have anything better to do.


Quote by Reverend_Taco
Grass stains on my dicks

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Pfft. Gay? Nah, gay is the manliest sex that exists.
#8
I've been teaching myself for four years now. The only thing I did for myself was practice and listen and try to imitate everyday. Don't stop practicing. If you've got a good drummer friend ask him/her for help.
#9
I actually learned a lot of tips and the majority of my current abilities through Youtube. Just keep browsing and browsing for an hour until you have collected a backlog of material to practise. Sign in and add all the videos that sound interesting to your favourites and watch them when you're ready to learn them.

I also download the videos and put them on my mp3 player so I can watch them while I'm actually playing drums. It's basically like a free teacher being right there to help you along. Of course, there are limitations, but it's free, there at any time, and always patient.

With that said, if you're not a naturally musical person and finding it very difficult to get into the 'groove' of drumming, a proper set of lessons from a professional and patient teacher will pay off greatly. I started off with bad technique, unlike when I started playing guitar. I was arrogant enough to believe that, since I was naturally talented at guitar, that it'd be the same with drums. It wasn't.

Most of the websites that I've used in the past have been mentioned already, but the particularly important ones have been specific teachers from specific Youtube channels or websites, where they only teach blast beats, as an example. If you're interested in jazz drumming, though, I won't be able to help, and neither will those teachers.

I say this when I teach guitar to my students: I won't be able to teach you jazz, classical, samba, or any strange, underground style. I can teach you how to perform, how to write, how to appreciate music, how to discover it, to research it, to love it. I'll obviously teach you scales, chords, pop music, rock music, metal music, etc. But learning how to find things yourself is crucial.
#11
Whenever you are gonna practice a technique or a groove idea or rudiments, ALWAYS practice it while there is some kind of background music going on or in some kind of musical fashion. If you practice it like a drum machine, you will eventually get it down but when you try to apply it in a musical way it will be difficult to do so. Practice in a musical setting and you will learn to be more musical naturally.