#1
Playing the lead or rhythm guitar to a song when you are covering it with a band? I just started a new band and we're thinking of covers. We're a trio right now, drummer, bassist-screamer/singer, and guitarist-backup singer (me)

Many of the bands all of us listen to have more than one guitar. I can't specify any songs at the moment, but if there are songs we want to do that have both a rhythm guitar and a lead guitar doing 'lead' stuff throughout most of the song (not just rhythmrhythmrhythmsolorhythm), what would be more important, rhythm or lead? Or somehow combining the two?
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#2
Find another guitarist. Have one play leads, have the other play rhythm.
#3
Only answer: It depends on the song.

Whichever part you think it most important in the given verse, chorus, bridge of the particular song you're covering, that's what you should play
I would suggest you keep any iconic/well known parts, if I hear a band playing Beast and the Harlot and the one guitarist is playing the power chords to the intro then I'd instantly lose interest. Then slap him in the balls.

If most of the stuff you're playing has 2 guitar parts and you're finding it difficult to cover them yourself then I don't see the problem with getting in a second guitarist, personally.
#5
It depends. It sounds like you're a metal band, which may require a second guitarist.

What I tend to do, being in a rock/alternative cover band, is to try to integrate lead lines in with the rhythm playing. But, this often brings out a sort of Hendrix/Frusciante flavour, which works quite well in this context. But with a screamer I don't think you want the guitar playing sounding like Hendrix.
#6
Right thanks, haha. We're all open to another guitarist, we just haven't found one yet. We're going for a kind of metal, post hardcore thing, but not metalcore necessarily. Some bands we like(for this type of band) are Enter Shikari, AFI, Billy Talent, Coheed and Cambria and Metallica.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#7
Ah. Well I think you could get away with it, providing you pick your arrangement of the covers correctly.
And work it so the sound isn't too "empty" when you're doing the lead bits.

Plus, my band, back before we were a covers band and when we were just a few people jamming (and we had a more "rock" singer) did a few Coheed songs, with me as the only guitarist and it came out alright.
And I can imagine Metallica being alright with only one guitar.
I don't know a lot about the other bands unfortunately.

But yeah, I thnik you could work around it, but if you like, wanted to be an accurate covers band kinda thing, you'd probably need a second guitarist.
#8
AFI, Enter Shikari and Billy Talent all have one guitarist so that's good there. We'll work on whatever we choose guitar wise, I'm pretty decent at guitar so I could probably pull off some 2 guitar songs. And we're going to have originals, we want to be a legitimate band, but we want a few covers under our belt so we can get better. And all the originals I'm writing are for one guitar.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#10
Whatever you do... unless the rhythm work is totally otherworldly, don't be the rhythm guitarist. It's like settling for sloppy seconds.
#11
I vaguely recall a documentary on Motorhead, which is a three piece, and they said that Lemmy plays power chords on the bass in some songs...doing that might fatten the sound up especially while you are soloing
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#12
Quote by AtomicBirdy
Whatever you do... unless the rhythm work is totally otherworldly, don't be the rhythm guitarist. It's like settling for sloppy seconds.


What a silly statement. The rhythm parts are as "otherworldly" as you make it. What would you say about bands that have one guitarist? Two lead guitarists?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#13
if the rhthym is the same as the bass just get your bass player an OD and some chorus or maybe an octaver.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#14
Quote by AlanHB
What a silly statement. The rhythm parts are as "otherworldly" as you make it. What would you say about bands that have one guitarist? Two lead guitarists?

What a silly statement. Rhythm guitarists who know the fretboard and have perfect technique/control are able to do solos and will explicitly be lead players. The only exception is if you're rhythm/singer-- but this is nullified by people like Alexi who can do both and sing. I keep thinking of people like Hetfield and want to barf.

Some of the best rhythm's I've heard come from lead guitarists (ESPECIALLY Loomis, he shits gold left right and center). Thus, one guitarist is good enough. If we take two, I think of Loomis paired up with Smythe and look what we got? TGE. ****ing slayed everything and was considered the band's apex.
Last edited by AtomicBirdy at Jun 18, 2011,
#15
Jeff Loomis is my idol. He makes me want to be one of those virtuoso rhythm-lead players no matter what genre I'm playing.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#16
Quote by AtomicBirdy
What a silly statement. Rhythm guitarists who know the fretboard and have perfect technique/control are able to do solos and will explicitly be lead players. The only exception is if you're rhythm/singer-- but this is nullified by people like Alexi who can do both and sing. I keep thinking of people like Hetfield and want to barf.


Hetfield plays quite a number if guitar solos, for example the first Master of Puppets solo. Is he still a rhythm player?

What about Izzy from GNR, he doesn't play solos on most of the songs but his rhythm parts are pretty cool...

Isn't the rhythm guitarist simply the person who plays the rhythm part of song on the guitar?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#17
Quote by AtomicBirdy
What a silly statement. Rhythm guitarists who know the fretboard and have perfect technique/control are able to do solos and will explicitly be lead players. The only exception is if you're rhythm/singer-- but this is nullified by people like Alexi who can do both and sing. I keep thinking of people like Hetfield and want to barf.

Some of the best rhythm's I've heard come from lead guitarists (ESPECIALLY Loomis, he shits gold left right and center). Thus, one guitarist is good enough. If we take two, I think of Loomis paired up with Smythe and look what we got? TGE. ****ing slayed everything and was considered the band's apex.


What I read: "If a bassist can play well enough, he may as well be a guitarist!"
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#18
Quote by AtomicBirdy
Whatever you do... unless the rhythm work is totally otherworldly, don't be the rhythm guitarist. It's like settling for sloppy seconds.


Interesting statement. Although mildly insulting, it holds some truth.

For example, rhythm guitar in my band seems absolutely content with doing ONLY rhythm, kinda like he gets the same band "street cred" without having to learn/play more complex lead parts. It frustrates me, since I get the impression he doesn't do the best job at mastering the material because he knows I will have it covered.

Most lead players will be playing rhythm parts when not doing solos/fills, so a lead player gives you 2 for the price of one.

Work around having another guitar player. It'll simplify your experience, and there will be less argument and compromise when it comes to deciding on what/how to play music. Only add a 2nd if absolutely critical.
#20
Cheapr2keepr summed up my thought. A lot of times it seems like rhythm guitarists wouldn't even attempt to learn 'lead' based ideas, as they're already in a band, so they believe there would be no need. Which is the problem. If you have a band say with 2 guitarists who both can do lead stuff, they may trade off solos. But if you take one of them and make them be just rhythm most of the time, then they may be fine because they know what their job is. And they could come up with sweet notey crazy rhythms.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#21
Quote by thePTOD
Cheapr2keepr summed up my thought. A lot of times it seems like rhythm guitarists wouldn't even attempt to learn 'lead' based ideas, as they're already in a band, so they believe there would be no need. Which is the problem. If you have a band say with 2 guitarists who both can do lead stuff, they may trade off solos. But if you take one of them and make them be just rhythm most of the time, then they may be fine because they know what their job is. And they could come up with sweet notey crazy rhythms.


People just tend to not realize that rhythm and lead are two completely different things. I was shredding for months before I got put into a rhythm position and realized how useless I was without that foundation, and most lead player don't realize how important it is to hold down the fort. If you make a lead player play bass for a year or two in a band situation, they'd probably be extremely humbled.
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#22
Quote by Hail
People just tend to not realize that rhythm and lead are two completely different things. I was shredding for months before I got put into a rhythm position and realized how useless I was without that foundation, and most lead player don't realize how important it is to hold down the fort. If you make a lead player play bass for a year or two in a band situation, they'd probably be extremely humbled.


i have never seen a band where lead guitarist just stands there and does nothing until soloing time comes up, he plays rhythm too... so i don't really understand about what kind of foundation you're talking about
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#23
Quote by AtomicBirdy
Whatever you do... unless the rhythm work is totally otherworldly, don't be the rhythm guitarist. It's like settling for sloppy seconds.




Not everyone wants to be a flashy shred guitarist, even in bands where I was better than the other guitarist I've always preferred playing rhythm guitar. Just personal preference and not "sloppy seconds" at all, I'd rather be a great rhythm player than a great lead player myself, it's obviously best to have skill in both areas but there's nothing wrong with favouring one over the other.
#24
I know I may look dumb to say this, but generally I play what I hear most, like on the solo parts I would play the solos, and stuff like that. That probably may be easier for me than others...
#25
Either get another guitarist (they aren't that hard to find) or make the basslines more ... loud and driving
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#26
Quote by hr113
i have never seen a band where lead guitarist just stands there and does nothing until soloing time comes up, he plays rhythm too... so i don't really understand about what kind of foundation you're talking about


How many lead players have you met that write their own rhythms?
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Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


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You win. I'm done here.
#27
Quote by Hail
How many lead players have you met that write their own rhythms?

To be honest i havent met a single guitarist that doesn't write rhythm parts, but the again, in my area i dont kn ow a band which would have rhythm guitarist exclusively on no-solos duty, so everyone gets slices of both pies
Quote by the_white_bunny
the point of life is to die.
and pay taxes.


Quote by /PurpleWhalez/
Blasphemy as severe as this is fucking unforgivable and by bullshito code you must commit sudoku for disgracing famirys honoru.
#28
Quote by fee.young
Either get another guitarist (they aren't that hard to find) or make the basslines more ... loud and driving


This is a good plan since I don't know many guitarists that would want to play the style we want, our bassist isn't the greatest but he can do some good stuff, especially while screaming at the same time. I've been writing riffs that harmonize my guitar and his bass, he'll be pretty loud haha.
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#29
i dunno buy a loop pedal?
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