#1
So, I've been wanting a new amp for a while because my Line 6 Spider IV 15w isn't cutting it anymore. I was thinking of getting a Vox amp of some sort that fit my budget ($150-$300, getting used), but I stumbled upon the Vox Tonelab Modeling Guitar processor for $160. My question is should I get a new amp or the Tonelab and keep my Spider? What are your experiences with the Tonelab?
you're a stone fox
Last edited by Saint78 at Jun 16, 2011,
#2
Well there are different models of the tonelab, but all are pretty good. I say go with the amp first though.
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#3
Quote by TheWizard42
Well there are different models of the tonelab, but all are pretty good. I say go with the amp first though.


Thanks.
you're a stone fox
#4
I had one of the first Tonelabs, the SE - great piece of kit, but whether it's suitable for you or not I don't know. If you need a lot of versatility and you need it in a portable unit, it's something to keep an eye on. If you just want a nice sounding amp... buy a nice sounding amp instead.
What music do you want to play?
Spiders don't take pedals well btw, and even if your Spider has a line-in or effects-loop to hook the Tonelab up to, you'd still have to deal with the Spider's crappy power-amp and speaker. Ain't worth it. For the Tonelab to sound good, it has to be plugged into a nice amplification system - a PA, keyboard or guitar amp. Plug it into something crappy and it'll sound crappy.
#5
Quote by TheQuailman
I had one of the first Tonelabs, the SE - great piece of kit, but whether it's suitable for you or not I don't know. If you need a lot of versatility and you need it in a portable unit, it's something to keep an eye on. If you just want a nice sounding amp... buy a nice sounding amp instead.
What music do you want to play?
Spiders don't take pedals well btw, and even if your Spider has a line-in or effects-loop to hook the Tonelab up to, you'd still have to deal with the Spider's crappy power-amp and speaker. Ain't worth it. For the Tonelab to sound good, it has to be plugged into a nice amplification system - a PA, keyboard or guitar amp. Plug it into something crappy and it'll sound crappy.


I decided on a Vox VT30 for $170 and depending on how much I get for the Spider I can save up a little and get a Tonelab too.
you're a stone fox
#6
There is no point in getting a Tonelab and a VT30. They both use the same modelling technology, so you'd basically be buying the same processor twice.

Therefore I'd rather recommend getting a small valve amp along with the Tonelabe, since such amps tend to take pedals better anyway.
#7
Quote by TheQuailman
There is no point in getting a Tonelab and a VT30. They both use the same modelling technology, so you'd basically be buying the same processor twice.

Therefore I'd rather recommend getting a small valve amp along with the Tonelabe, since such amps tend to take pedals better anyway.

+1 on that
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#8
Quote by TheQuailman
There is no point in getting a Tonelab and a VT30. They both use the same modelling technology, so you'd basically be buying the same processor twice.

Therefore I'd rather recommend getting a small valve amp along with the Tonelabe, since such amps tend to take pedals better anyway.

This, plus the fact that the VT30 isn't really a big upgrade from the Spider you currently have. Its a bit nicer, but not much of an upgrade.
#9
Yeah, I've tried the VT series a few times and although its OK, its stell got this "trapped in a box" kind of sound. Like its too compressed, and their is a few sheets of paper infront of the speaker.

Its cool if you really want to get it, we can't stop you. But hang on, what kind of music do you even play before we start making suggestions?

Just a general suggestion, you might like something like the epiphone valve junior and a tonelab. Are you going to play with a full band at some point? Gigging?
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Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#10
Yeah,save up and get a nice tube amp.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#11
Get rid of your line 6 immediately and get an all tube amp, there really is no substitute. I was skeptical for the longest time but now agree with the traditionalists that tube tone is still superior to all the modelling devices out there. The Tonelab is still a copy of tube amps plus all the effects. If you sell your line 6 with that cash to be in the price range for a low-watt tube amp of 15-30W, which is plenty to play in a band. And you can always buy a cheap digitech multieffects box if you want all those other effects.
#12
You don't need an all tube amp, settle for a Vox amp if you want Tonelab effects or a Peavey Vypyr, both sound tube-like.
#13
Quote by PussyPunk182
Yeah, I've tried the VT series a few times and although its OK, its stell got this "trapped in a box" kind of sound. Like its too compressed, and their is a few sheets of paper infront of the speaker.

Its cool if you really want to get it, we can't stop you. But hang on, what kind of music do you even play before we start making suggestions?

Just a general suggestion, you might like something like the epiphone valve junior and a tonelab. Are you going to play with a full band at some point? Gigging?


I play everything from blues to reggae to progressive djent metal. Im more looking to record, Im not in a band yet but Im working on it, so therefore Im not gigging.
you're a stone fox
#14
Tonelab, or modelling in general sounds like a good idea then. The good thing about the Tonelab is that it can be used with headphones, and also hooked up directly to a recording interface, since it has built-in speaker-simulation. On the old Tonelabs, the simulation didn't work too great for high-gain, which made external speaker-sims a necessity. There's a couple of good hardware and software sims out there (and some of the software ones are even free), so it's not a big deal, but I just wanted to mention it. Lower gain tones were alright with the speaker sim. Grab a pair of headphones and plug them into a Tonelab at the store to see if it's speaker sims appeal to you. I'd bet they improved ever since the first models came out.

For clarification: You need a speaker sim if you run a guitar preamp/modeller into any full-range amplification/speaker-system, to recreate a guitar speaker's tone. Without that, the whole thing will sound like absolute ass, particularly when distorted. If you plug into a guitar amp instead, you don't really need to use the sim - it's still fun to have for screwing around with your tone though.

I propse the following: Get the Tonelab and use it with headphones and for recording until you have the cash to buy a nice amp to plug it into.

Alternatively, maybe look into a used Line6 Flextone III - they're discontinued, but can be found for reasonable prices on the used market. It's also a modeller, but kicks the Tonelab's butt when it comes to heavy distortion.
#15
Quote by TheQuailman
Tonelab, or modelling in general sounds like a good idea then. The good thing about the Tonelab is that it can be used with headphones, and also hooked up directly to a recording interface, since it has built-in speaker-simulation. On the old Tonelabs, the simulation didn't work too great for high-gain, which made external speaker-sims a necessity. There's a couple of good hardware and software sims out there (and some of the software ones are even free), so it's not a big deal, but I just wanted to mention it. Lower gain tones were alright with the speaker sim. Grab a pair of headphones and plug them into a Tonelab at the store to see if it's speaker sims appeal to you. I'd bet they improved ever since the first models came out.

For clarification: You need a speaker sim if you run a guitar preamp/modeller into any full-range amplification/speaker-system, to recreate a guitar speaker's tone. Without that, the whole thing will sound like absolute ass, particularly when distorted. If you plug into a guitar amp instead, you don't really need to use the sim - it's still fun to have for screwing around with your tone though.

I propse the following: Get the Tonelab and use it with headphones and for recording until you have the cash to buy a nice amp to plug it into.

Alternatively, maybe look into a used Line6 Flextone III - they're discontinued, but can be found for reasonable prices on the used market. It's also a modeller, but kicks the Tonelab's butt when it comes to heavy distortion.


To be honest Im probably just gonna get an amp, but Im probably not gonna get that Vox one. Im checking out a pawn shop later today.
you're a stone fox