#1
http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/e/elton_john/saturday_nights_alright_for_fighting_crd.htm

Those are the chords, I googled this and a lot of different answers came up, one said G major for the verse and C major for the chorus. But I think that may be wrong and that the verse in C major, seeming as it has C,F,G and Dm7 which are all in the key of C major, then I think the chorus is in F major seeming as it's got F,Bb and C. Is this right? Because I'm going against some of the answers in google. Also if I was soloing over this, would I just have to use the C major scale for the verse then just switch to the F major, simple as that, because I have never dealt with key changes like this in particular. Any other tips for the soloing is appreciated, thanks.
My name is Jack.
#2
Well Jack, with my limited knowledge of music theory I think it's in the key of G. Depends on how you look at it, of course, but it would make sense if the F chord was the flat six (to build tension) the C is the three etc. The chorus should be in the key of C. You should note that there's a two-five leading up the C for the transition.

Soloing over this should be tricky. As such, I'm not going to say anything because I would have to assume, so I'll let another member talk about that.

Good luck!
#3
C major for verse, then it changes to F major for the chorus is what I'll say after glancing over the first verse and chorus quickly. The reason why I don't think the verse is in G is because G is the perfect fifth of C and F is the perfect fourth, so it's just a standard I-IV-V kinda thing, also the Dm7 is part of C major and F major so that would work as a transition.
Last edited by Ascendant at Jun 17, 2011,
#4
Pretty sure it goes from G to F, as Dm binds the verse to the chorus.

Don't hestitate to do some pentatonic licks in the lead.
#7
I'm thinking the verse is in G major and the chorus is in C major. The progression in each key is I-VII-IV-I. Using the subtonic (lowered 7) rather than the leading tone for the second chord allows all of the harmonies to be major triads and it gives it a sort of 'rock/pop' sound. The Dm7 functions as a transitional chord since it lacks the leading tone of G major and works as a ii7 chord in C major.

For soloing I would recommend using a mixolydian or even a blues scale. Experiment with both raised and lowered 7th but I'm guessing the lowered 7th would fit in better with the sound of the song.
#8
Quote by Sean0913
What does it resolve to?


This, definitely. You have to hear the resolution. As far as taking an educated guess...The Verse and Chorus have a recognizable pattern to them:

1st chord -> step down -> fourth down -> fifth up (a repeat of the first chord)

The step down is likely a borrowed subtonic (functioning as dominant), the third chord being the subdominant (as a predominant)...so, G for the verse, C for the chorus is a very real possibility.

The whole thing could be in C as well: V - IV - I - V for the verse, I - bVII - IV - I for the chorus. But, since this is how you will actually know the key, allow me to repeat [someone else] yet again!

Quote by Sean0913
What does it resolve to?


Ya dig?
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#9
After listening to the song I can most definitely hear that the verse is in G major with a I-bVII-IV-I progression. It would be really hard to make yourself hear it as a V-IV-I-V. The C does not feel like a tonic at all. Especially consider the fact that the intro consists of only G and F chords.
#10
Quote by RobinTrower12
After listening to the song I can most definitely hear that the verse is in G major with a I-bVII-IV-I progression.


Good! I feel like the point of actually listening to the music they are playing/writing/studying is sadly lost on too many people. Did you hear resolution in the chorus?
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#11
If everything is in scale without any borrowed chords you're right.
And you really should go witht he idea of non borrowed chords.