#2
you could probably pick up a used Shure SM57 for that price. They're pretty much THE go-to mic for instrument recording

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#6
Quote by ragingben
Or a 58 if your after a vocal mic

Tbh I prefer the 57 even on vocals any day.

Quote by crohno
can a sm58 record both amp and vocals

Yes, but the sm57 does both better. Not that either of them do vocals particularly well though.
Last edited by Ascendant at Jun 17, 2011,
#7
Yes, the 58 can do both, though I do prefer the 57 as well.

Quote by Ascendant
Tbh I prefer the 57 even on vocals any day.


Yes, but the sm57 does both better. Not that either of them do vocals particularly well though.


You've obviously never heard what some people can do with a 57/58 on vocals. A great number of lower budget classic rock albums used them and I've heard some tracks you would swear were on a $1000 condenser done on a 57.
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#8
Quote by Artemis Entreri

You've obviously never heard what some people can do with a 57/58 on vocals. A great number of lower budget classic rock albums used them and I've heard some tracks you would swear were on a $1000 condenser done on a 57.


I obviously haven't? Why so hostile man, I've heard lots of great vocals recorded with an sm57, everything is relative, and of course subjective. I didn't say you can't record vocals with them, though I would probably always take an sm7b for male vocals over an sm57.
Last edited by Ascendant at Jun 17, 2011,
#9
Yes, it is (was) in the wrong part of the forum. It's not the first one you've misplaced, either. Please take a minute to check the right one before making threads.
#10
Quote by Ascendant
I obviously haven't? Why so hostile man, I've heard lots of great vocals recorded with an sm57, everything is relative, and of course subjective. I didn't say you can't record vocals with them, though I would probably take an sm7b for male vocals over a 57.


Agree 100%
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#11
sm7b is a better mic for studio and the sm57/58 are better as all rounders.they're all good mics but the results you get with the 57/58 depend a good deal on your preamp
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#12
I wouldn't record vocals with a 57, I'd get a condenser. I'd just get a AT2020 and use an amp sim instead of that Deville you've got
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#13
I love the 57 vs 58 debate. They're the same mic, with the exception the 58's windscreen and ball grill (which will have a marginal effect on frequency response).
#14
It really depends what you want to do with the mic.

I almost never use a 58 to record vocals. I'll try almost anything in my collection before I try that one. However, on one singer.... that was THE perfect mic for her.

The absolute best mic brand new under $100 IMHO is the Behringer ECM8000. It rings in somewhere around $40. Mind you.... if I'm recording vocals.... even that one is a less likely choice for them than the 58 as an option. They're deadly accurate spot mics. They do drum overheads, for instance, really well - so long as you don't mind the fact that they're omnis.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
Quote by lockwolf
I wouldn't record vocals with a 57, I'd get a condenser. I'd just get a AT2020 and use an amp sim instead of that Deville you've got
Would you use an LDC over a dynamic even in a small, acoustically untreated room?
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#16
If you're just dropping a mic right up in front of the grille on a screaming guitar amp.... the room hardly matters.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
Quote by lockwolf
I wouldn't record vocals with a 57, I'd get a condenser. I'd just get a AT2020 and use an amp sim instead of that Deville you've got

This, definatly.
#18
Quote by ragingben
Or a 58 if your after a vocal mic

I'm putting down some vocals with the 58 right now, and I friggin love it.

It's the first "real" mic I've gotten, but the difference in quality to my old piece of shit Digital Reference DR-VX1 mic is just incredible.

EDIT: also, vocal mics are very tricky to give advice on, because every vocalist sounds completely different, and one great mic for one dude might sound like crap for someone else.
Last edited by CoreysMonster at Jun 18, 2011,
#19
Quote by CoreysMonster
I'm putting down some vocals with the 58 right now, and I friggin love it.

It's the first "real" mic I've gotten, but the difference in quality to my old piece of shit Digital Reference DR-VX1 mic is just incredible.


... a great example of how "everything is relative" I suppose.

Quote by CoreysMonster

every vocalist sounds completely different, and one great mic for one dude might sound like crap for someone else.


This is entirely true, but there are tendencies. Most studios, if recording a lead vocal will first reach for their trusty U87. Why? Because it sounds pretty awesome on damned near any singer. However, Michael Jackson sounded billiant through an SM7 on the Thriller album. It's not like Quincy Jones sat there and said, "I'll just use this, but I wish I had a U87." LOL.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#20
Quote by axemanchris

This is entirely true, but there are tendencies. Most studios, if recording a lead vocal will first reach for their trusty U87. Why? Because it sounds pretty awesome on damned near any singer. However, Michael Jackson sounded billiant through an SM7 on the Thriller album. It's not like Quincy Jones sat there and said, "I'll just use this, but I wish I had a U87." LOL.

CT

For a 2500€ mic it'd BETTER sound awesome on any singer
#21
It does. That's why it costs 2500 bucks...



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
I wish I had one o' them. F---, I wish I just had $350 to get an SM7B. Of course, then I'd need a more powerful preamp.

Quote by axemanchris
If you're just dropping a mic right up in front of the grille on a screaming guitar amp.... the room hardly matters.

CT
Maybe so... but vocals?
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Last edited by muso_catolico at Jun 18, 2011,
#23
Yeah, for vocals the room makes a pretty significant difference. When I posted that quote, I had quoted something that was said about using amp sims and getting rid of an amp and getting a condensor.... and wasn't really interpreting it clearly.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#24
Quote by axemanchris
If you're just dropping a mic right up in front of the grille on a screaming guitar amp.... the room hardly matters.

CT

The room actually matters a LOT, sometimes even more than the mic. A shitty room can add horrible amounts of mud in the low mids, doesn't matter how close you place the mic. Room and the floor the amp is standing on will affect the response of the cab.

The room always makes a difference, no matter what you're recording, as long as there's a mic involved. Sure there's post processing, but it can really only get you so far if the source is crap.
Last edited by Ascendant at Jun 19, 2011,
#25
As a general rule, the farther away the mic is from the source, the more the room matters. When a very loud source is blasted right into the capsule of the mic, there is little opportunity for the sound of the object to interact with the "sound" of the room.

That said, if your room is *really* terrible and you're using an omni mic in a location within the room that has a really terrible buildup of 60hz or something, then yes, it can still make a difference. But something like a 57 is pretty directional. There's not much opportunity for the mic to interact with the sound of the room.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#26
Omni mic or not, the room as a whole will always make a difference, try recording a 4x12 or 2x12 in a small or medium sized room not 100% properly treated (the situation for 99% of this forum). Try elevating it from the floor, moving it around and rotating it differently, placing mattresses behind the mic etc. There will be plenty of difference, especially in the lows and low mids.