#1
I need to buy a guitar online - it is a refund credit thing. And am considering between a PRS custom 22 and 24.

Now I can work out that the 22 is a pretty standard neck with 22 frets over 25" scale. But the other is 24 frets over the same scale. So how is this achieved? Where are the frets closer?

And what type of style does the 24 fret suit? I know there are PU variants, etc., but in principle? Is this a guitar more suited to metal or driven rock style, faster shredding, etc as opposed to the more conventional blues/rock style of a 22 fret model?

I know this is a bit bizarre but I need to make a fast decision on this to get the best deal from the dealer, otherwise, I would test the guitars before buying!
#2
cant have the frets closer, than changes scale length. all fret spacing is done by a very precise matchmatical calculation and is finite. cant be changed of your guitar will technically not play right and sound like garbage (i am pretty sure).

24 fret guitars have the neck pickup moved slightly back. this allows for an extra 2 frets AND changes the tone because the neck pickup is sensing a different part of the string.

most people prefer 24 fret guitars because of the tonal change, not the 2 extra frets. only shredders that really care about 2 full octaves really mind that. some guitars have 27 frets and those require extensive design changes and longer scale lengths

as for the tonal change, science says that a 24 fret guitar is statistically better because the pickup is under a perfect spot of the string for sesing vibration and movement, wereas a 22 fret guitar has the pickup right under a "node" and is less likely to pick up harmonic content.

a good portion of people say it doesnt matter, some say it does. guitars like les pauls have 22 frets and have made sound of the best sounding guitar tones around. so you be the judge.

technically, the further back you move the pickup, the "brighter" it will be (why a bridge pickup is brighter than a neck....and bridge pups are always slightly higher output to make up for the lack of string vibration so close to the bridge). so one can deduce that a guitar with 24 frets will have a slightly brighter neck pup than the same exact guitar with 22 frets.
#3
Thanks, great answer and very helpful. Although I still cannot understand how you fit both 22 and 24 frets into the same length of next without reducing the space. I do, of course, understand your point about changing the gap would affect the accuracy of notes but cannot get my head around it.
Is it that the neck is measured from body of guitar to headstock and the board can vary in length?
#4
The scale length is the distance from the guitar's nut to the bridge. A 24 fret fretboard is longer than a 22 fret board for the same scale length. Essentially it is the same as the 22 but with two extra frets added on the end.

That means that for a 24 the fretboard extends deeper into the guitar body, often requiring extra cutaway for playability. It also means that the neck pickup moves slightly closer to the bridge.
#5
Thanks, confuse-a-cat. I think I get it now. And I think my choice would be the 24!
#8
there is a bit more different between the guitars than just the number of frets.

pups, neck profile, bridge options.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#10
You'll probally want the 24, the only reason guitars have 22 frets is for the neck pickup to be further away from the bridge, altering tone.
The 21-fret stratocaster is known for its tone on the neck pickup, but I hate playing a guitar with 22 or less frets and "running out of options" while shredding. I never go past 20 or so but I can make dramatic statements by bending the 24th with vibrato and its..
Nevermind.

Yeah I get the 24 fret.
2 octaves FTW.
METAL!
#11
Quote by ikey_
....most people prefer 24 fret guitars because of the tonal change....


Understand that I'm not having a go at you here, just a general point: but I find it interesting that you say that. Seems like a lot of people I have encountered when discussing this subject don't like the tonal change with the neck pickup being pushed back further.

One very notable one (who I have not encountered in person, but still ) is Joe Satriani. He has only played his 22 fret Ibanez sig for years, until finally bringing out his 24 fret version - and on the 24 fret one he's got the humbucker the size of a single coil pickup because I believe he said in an interview that he doesn't like how the neck pickup gets pushed back and changes the tone.

And to be honest, as much as I love and almost only ever play 24 fret guitars, I think the neck pickups have generally sounded a bit nicer in 22 fret guitars that I have owned/played. But not a dramatic enough difference that I would ever choose the 22 over the 24, I like the range.

But that says it all really, it's just opinion. Very interesting post by the way, very informative. Cheers.
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#12
well yeah i guess i should word that differently:

most people that CHOOSE 24 fret guitars do so for thier tonal change in the neck pickup
#13
keep in mind the 22s have the dragon II pickups and the 24s have the HFS/Vintage bass pickups. that would be the deciding factor for me. HFS/VB are the higher output combo
PRS CE22
PRS SE Santana
Fender Spalted Maple Tele
Squier Affinity Tele w.mods
Mesa Boogie Mark IV Combo + 212 Recto Cab
Homemade Ash Bass
BBE Two Timer
DUNLOP Wah
BOSS GE-7
KORG Pitchblack
MXR Dyna Comp

www.myspace.com/shapesofgrey
#14
I preffer the 22 model I have the CE22(bolt on CU22) and I like the pickups better, they aren't as hot , but sound realy good clean/distorted with literaly no feed back at all, I can't say that about my G-400 with a SH-4 in the bridge( it feeds back pretty bad)
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#15
Quote by Carndawgy
keep in mind the 22s have the dragon II pickups and the 24s have the HFS/Vintage bass pickups. that would be the deciding factor for me. HFS/VB are the higher output combo

Thanks, Carndawgy. Not having tried these, I thought it was actually the other way around.

Since we have opened this discussion up further. The 22 has a wide/fat neck while the 24 is described as a standard neck. What do PRS consider standard?
#16
you can/could get ether profile on ether model, but the CU22 was/seemed more available in the wide/fat carve and the 24 the wide/thin carve.
It is kinda hard to describe the feal, but when I played my CE22 in the store it just felt right it fit my hand with out being too narrow wide and thick enough , but not Gibson thick.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#17
i think my CE22 has a standard carve if i remember correctly (to be honest i dont even know if thats true). i'm gonna describe as not as chunky as a les paul, more like that MIA strat i had but not as wide either.. i found it very round and comfy. didnt feel as flat as the strat (good thing for me) and a easier to navigate than all the LP necks ive tried. im not an LP fan really.

are you looking used market for these or new? if used, do u mind linking the ads so we can have a peak? i just love PRS gear in general..
BTW. dont be afraid to ditch the 5 way rotary switch if you're not fond of it. i went to the 3 way toggle/push-pull and like it WAY better. the sound of the dragon IIs humbuckers in parallel is very very nice, which you cant get on the 5 way. its my primary clean sound, even more so than the single coil options
PRS CE22
PRS SE Santana
Fender Spalted Maple Tele
Squier Affinity Tele w.mods
Mesa Boogie Mark IV Combo + 212 Recto Cab
Homemade Ash Bass
BBE Two Timer
DUNLOP Wah
BOSS GE-7
KORG Pitchblack
MXR Dyna Comp

www.myspace.com/shapesofgrey
#18
Thanks. I bought a LP Class 5 which had a dodgy pole piece on the bridge pickup. I returned it to the dealer and instead of replacing with another LP, I am replacing with a PRS and a Laney amp. The choices of the PRS guitars are a custom 22 or 24. They are older models with the rotary switches - not the 2011 models with the blade switch. Just now I have an Eric Johnson Strat which has a pretty flat 12" neck and I absolutely love it.

I was not so keen on the LP neck which was a 60s neck. It also seems that the PRS would resonate better as the strings pass through the body?

What is the switching on the 5 way rotary on the 24?
#19
Rotary Positions

Position 10: Treble pickup - powerful with plenty of definition – traditional humbucker tone
Position 9: Outside coils in parallel - deep and clear sound
Position 8: Series single coils - warm version of the “in between the treble and middle pickups”
Position 7: Parallel single coils - crisp version of the “in between the treble and middle pickups”
Position 6: Bass pickup - warm with tons of character – traditional humbucker tone

that's what they are for.

they are the same on the new 5 way blade switch.

22's are nice guitars. i grabbed a Custom 24 myself, haven't looked back.

also, the EJ strat is sweet. congrats.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#20
Quote by gregs1020

also, the EJ strat is sweet. congrats.


Thanks, gregs, for the advice. The Strat can be a bit of a spoiler when checking other guitars.
#21
The PRS arrived today and I am still getting used to it. It is much brighter than I expected!

The trem was setup when it arrived. That surprised me since my Strat was not. The bridge was fixed. The PRS has only 4 springs attached to the trem block with the centre spring removed. However, the fifth spring was not provided in the case. Should all 5 springs be supplied with the guitar?
#22
Quote by erskine
The PRS arrived today and I am still getting used to it. It is much brighter than I expected!

The trem was setup when it arrived. That surprised me since my Strat was not. The bridge was fixed. The PRS has only 4 springs attached to the trem block with the centre spring removed. However, the fifth spring was not provided in the case. Should all 5 springs be supplied with the guitar?

i can't remember if my 513 had an extra in the case, i don't think it did. (i would never need 5 springs though).

what did you get? pics man pics!

I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#23
I got a Custom 24, Dark Cherry Sunburst. The trem securing screw is also missing, so I suspect that there may be an envelope with that screw and the 5th trem spring missing. I know that Fender have an envelope in the case for springs that you remove.

No manual either with the guitar. Thought there would be something telling you how to setup, maintain, etc the guitar............but maybe not?






Edit: I now realise that the trem screw is recessed and tightened with an Allen key - not a screwdriver. And it has been confirmed with PRS distributors in the UK, that the guitar comes with 4 springs only.
Last edited by erskine at Jun 23, 2011,