#1
More and more im beginning to feel that i have nowhere else to go on my guitar. Melodic metal is my favorite thing to play (a lot of dumbshits call it "metalcore", but "core" labels are dumb as **** because no one can agree on what "core" something is, so i just call it all metal). I feel like any good riff that is melodic yet heavy and badass has already been used in some form or another, and by me trying to create my own im just contributing to the already over-saturated genre. ive tried adding more tripple picks to make it heavier, but i just end up sounding like a parkway drive wannabe. Does anyone else ever just feel completely and totally uninspired? Like anything they "write" is just some regurgitation of something that was better the first time through?
And if so how do you overcome this sense of being just another dime a dozen guitar player?
#2
idk if you do this already or not, but having a drum track program or other backing instruments on the computer can really help you figure out how you feel about a riff. Sometimes i listen to just my guitar tracks and they sound uninspiring and empty but with a drum track and maybe and octave setting to achieve a bass track, stuff starts sounding a lot better.

Its also possible that you don't have any new bands that inspire you? maybe try a different genre altogether or a different subgenre of metal and see if something catches you offguard, maybe some prog metal, djenty stuff or maybe just listen to bands that you cant stand the vocals but enjoy the musicianship and maybe something new will come out of that.

I totally understand what your saying though, i normally throw away most of my writing ideas cause they sound very generic and already been done a thousand times.

Goodluck Sir
#3
I've actually never felt like that. Then again, I play noise-drenched grunge funk.

I suggest you diversify! Listen to Spanish and Chinese classical music and Indian religious music until you can play them confidently, those blend well into metal. Work on polyrhythms, or at least weird time signatures--everything sounds fresh and new if you play it in 9/8 time. Or 5/4. Or π/4. Play around with timing, phrasing, mid-riff changes of key.

Don't worry, if you play enough different kinds of music enough you'll come up with something nobody has done before.
Money beats soul every time.

Money beats soul...every time.

Money...beats soul...every...goddamn...time.
#5
listening to new music is a good place to start but when i hear "new" bands very rarely do i hear something i like better than the bands i already know. i listen to the bands i listen to because i feel that they are the best of their type. im not the kind of person that listens to 1000 bands and brags about it like it makes me cool. i honestly am just hard to impress i think. veil of maya is a band ive been getting into but they have super ****ed up timings with all the djenting and sweeps that are impossible, so i dont think ill ever get anywhere with their songs.
#6
different to different styles of music outside of your normal metal genre

something completely different
blues,jazz,folk or try to play something dfferent for a while

take up country(or other) and see if you can come up with new stuff and be refreshed when you go back to your favorite genre
#7
Quote by nkibilko
[...] trying to create my own im just contributing to the already over-saturated genre?


Well, is there a genre you can contribute to? I know it's the big thing right now, but there is more music than just metal. I play hard rock, progressive rock, punk, ska, hip-hop and classical. It's more than just playing a genre or several genres, playing different kinds of music bleed into your playing as a whole, creating more interesting sounds. Classical has some of the greatest, most expressive melodies you'll ever hear; I wouldn't commit to it exclusively, but it helps my melody-writing in general. Likewise, hip-hop and ska taught me how to play syncopation real well: it's to the point that I put at least simple syncopated ideas into just about everything I play. Progressive rock helped me master time signatures and exposed me to abnormal, but brilliant-sounding ideas. All of these bleeds into each other and I'm left with my own style of playing, a "fingerprint" if you will. If you're passionate about metal, that's fine, but if you don't experiment and take some outside influence you will "sound like everyone else."

There have already been suggestions for other genres; you don't have to go crazy with it and start listening to Ancient Greek music and native Australian music or anything, but try something different. If you don't already listen to classic rock or blues, that would be a good start. Both of those styles made metal what it is now. If you want to go a little more wild, try Reggae, Funk or Jazz, see what happens!
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#8
I think this quote sums it up nicely:

"Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is nonexistent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery — celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from — it’s where you take them to.” "
—Jim Jarmusch

I've no idea who Jim Jarmusch is, but those are words to live by
#9
Your problem is listening to generic music too much.

Stuff like Metalcore (Im assuming you listen to this since you mentioned Parkway Drive)
Is just very generic, from an outsiders opinion it sounds indifferent.

So really if you want to play Metalcore, you don't need to be anything new as all the bands that have 'made it' just sound similar anyway.

Some ways people get over the 'discouraged' state is by
1.Listening & learning new music outside your comfort zone.
2.Leaving the guitar alone and coming back to it when you have the urge to play.
3.Learning some theory, disecting songs.
4.Learning some more songs, tackling a tricky riff or solo.
5.Watching other guitar players, play (DVD, Youtube, etc)

This type of thread has been done before, so just check and have a look if someone has said anything better on other threads.
#10
Quote by nkibilko
listening to new music is a good place to start but when i hear "new" bands very rarely do i hear something i like better than the bands i already know. i listen to the bands i listen to because i feel that they are the best of their type. im not the kind of person that listens to 1000 bands and brags about it like it makes me cool. i honestly am just hard to impress i think. veil of maya is a band ive been getting into but they have super ****ed up timings with all the djenting and sweeps that are impossible, so i dont think ill ever get anywhere with their songs.

If you'll notice, nobody suggested you listen to a ton of bands then brag about it. We suggested you listen to different bands and learn from them. If you can't find something worth studying in any bands other than the ones you're listening to now, then you're already as good as you'll ever get.
Money beats soul every time.

Money beats soul...every time.

Money...beats soul...every...goddamn...time.
#11
Try playing one of your riffs that you think sounds like something you've heard before..and play it in reverse. Every single note
#12
to soviet ska, i was in a ska band for about 4 years and it was great, but i played bass. guitar in ska is super boring. i consider the bass to be the lead stringed instrument, and the guitar to be the rhythm
#13
Quote by nkibilko
listening to new music is a good place to start but when i hear "new" bands very rarely do i hear something i like better than the bands i already know. i listen to the bands i listen to because i feel that they are the best of their type. im not the kind of person that listens to 1000 bands and brags about it like it makes me cool. i honestly am just hard to impress i think. veil of maya is a band ive been getting into but they have super ****ed up timings with all the djenting and sweeps that are impossible, so i dont think ill ever get anywhere with their songs.



I am going to preface this by saying I am not trying to insult you. I think you might be being a little close minded. Sure you might think that whatever band you listen to is the best at whatever they do, and thats cool. But maybe its time to listen or at least explore other genres like blues, jazz, or classical. Not only do they spice up your playlist, but you can take things you hear there and apply them to the music you like to create new sounds.

I used to be in the same boat. I had little interest in music outside by primary genre. But then I was forced to listen to jazz. As a guitarist, I can't help but appreciate, admire, and enjoy the playing that goes into that music. In the end it opened up a lot of new doors for my playing.
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
omfg i totally forgot about that, you sir are jesus christ.
#14
Quote by nkibilko
to soviet ska, i was in a ska band for about 4 years and it was great, but i played bass. guitar in ska is super boring. i consider the bass to be the lead stringed instrument, and the guitar to be the rhythm


Fair enough. Most of the genre's guitarists DO all play the same way. Learning the pattern and working on only emphasizing off-beats helped my sense of timing greatly. What's important is that you had the experience in the genre. Try to apply what you learned on bass in a ska band to your playing now. Personally, I love when the bass skips the first eighth note then drives consistently the rest of the bar.

Would you consider playing a different instrument? It's a much bigger time commitment than just listening to new music, sure, but you'll get some different ideas and exposure. Piano is a good choice--but it's hard as hell, trust me--or you could try violin/cello since you already have string experience. Maybe go way out there and tuba it up! Or, learn to sing if you can't already.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#16
Quote by AeolianSeventh
π/4. .



As for TS

as previously mentioned - listen to variety of music styles
as for my sugestion
polyrhythms - you can always separate rhythmic heavy section and melodic lead, but that has already been done (see melodic death metal). New approach to this, albeit borrowed from djent and certain jazz - make those two, rhythmic and melodic, sections clash using polyrhthms.

Polyrythm is when two are played at diffirent, dont know the word, "tempos"

Egzample: rhytmic part goes in 8th notes, while melodic is played in pentuplets (5 notes per beat). Some clash between two instruments, sound becomes tad more interesting.

Metalcore is very oversaturated sub-genre, while the idea behind it seems great on paper (heavy yet melodic riffs, wide vocal range ,wide as in screaming/growling/singing etc.), in reallity it's executed quite poorly and became the parody of metal rather than it's respectable sub-genre.

Maybe you could find something fresher, less common, with more room for your ideas?

Speaking from musical standpoint, not lyrical
Black metal maybe? i would recommend Emperor and Windir if you would be interested, some nice melodic stuff there, quite epic too. Might be right up your alley
Quote by the_white_bunny
the point of life is to die.
and pay taxes.


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Blasphemy as severe as this is fucking unforgivable and by bullshito code you must commit sudoku for disgracing famirys honoru.
#17
I'm sure its not all been done.
Think up something new now!
Write your own shit even if its shit its still your own.
#18
Quote by TheDistracted
I think this quote sums it up nicely:

"Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is nonexistent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery — celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from — it’s where you take them to.” "
—Jim Jarmusch

I've no idea who Jim Jarmusch is, but those are words to live by


I might be wrong but i think hes a movie director. Anyway about 100 years ago a guy proposed to close the patenting office because everything that could be invented had been invented.
#19
As TheDistracted already quoted! No idea you will ever have will be completely new, all is based on what you've heard/seen/felt before. Your creativity is how you combine those ideas. That's not only for music, but for practically everything. As much as I like to deny it too

When you've got an idea and it sounds very similar to what you know, don't just throw it away. Adding instruments/second voices, other tempo, ... can change a song completely! Even the way you play it may change the song (cfr Dream Theater). Think about that duo or trio that played 4 chords and sang a couple of 50 FAMOUS songs over those SAME chords! Just don't give up!

Creativity is the art of hiding your sources. - Einstein
lalala
#20
Quote by nkibilko
More and more im beginning to feel that i have nowhere else to go on my guitar. Melodic metal is my favorite thing to play (a lot of dumbshits call it "metalcore", but "core" labels are dumb as **** because no one can agree on what "core" something is, so i just call it all metal). I feel like any good riff that is melodic yet heavy and badass has already been used in some form or another, and by me trying to create my own im just contributing to the already over-saturated genre. ive tried adding more tripple picks to make it heavier, but i just end up sounding like a parkway drive wannabe. Does anyone else ever just feel completely and totally uninspired? Like anything they "write" is just some regurgitation of something that was better the first time through?
And if so how do you overcome this sense of being just another dime a dozen guitar player?


Don't take yourself too seriously.

enjoy playing your guitar.

Be genuine.
shred is gaudy music
#21
Quote by austhrax
listen to some new music,sucks just playing 1 type of music


I agree... though you'd be surprised how many eople live and die playing one type of music. I know many people who exclusively listen rock and won't even touch blues/jazz/classical.
#22
People we're saying this fifty years ago. There will always be new things to do. Trying making original music, whether it sounds good or not. Then keep doing it until it sounds good.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#23
Quote by AeolianSeventh
I've actually never felt like that. Then again, I play noise-drenched grunge funk.

I suggest you diversify! Listen to Spanish and Chinese classical music and Indian religious music until you can play them confidently, those blend well into metal. Work on polyrhythms, or at least weird time signatures--everything sounds fresh and new if you play it in 9/8 time. Or 5/4. Or π/4. Play around with timing, phrasing, mid-riff changes of key.

Don't worry, if you play enough different kinds of music enough you'll come up with something nobody has done before.


I get the point but I am pretty sure you have no idea how to play anything you just told that guy to learn. Indian religious music...yeah ok sure buddy.
#24
Quote by nkibilko
More and more im beginning to feel that i have nowhere else to go on my guitar. Melodic metal is my favorite thing to play (a lot of dumbshits call it "metalcore", but "core" labels are dumb as **** because no one can agree on what "core" something is, so i just call it all metal). I feel like any good riff that is melodic yet heavy and badass has already been used in some form or another, and by me trying to create my own im just contributing to the already over-saturated genre. ive tried adding more tripple picks to make it heavier, but i just end up sounding like a parkway drive wannabe. Does anyone else ever just feel completely and totally uninspired? Like anything they "write" is just some regurgitation of something that was better the first time through?
And if so how do you overcome this sense of being just another dime a dozen guitar player?


You're going to be influenced by what you spend your time listening to and absorbing. If you want different then change what you listen to. Cause all you can hear and think of is inspired from what you listen to.

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 18, 2011,
#25
A famous Canadian literary critic by the name of Northrop Fyre once said:

"the human imagination is limited to what we know, but the combinations of what we know is endless"

something like that. Anyways, expand your knowledge, listen to other genres!

If you study literary criticism in school you'll know that all literature comes from other literature, and that nothing is completely original. Everything is built on common conventions and archetypes that have been used over and over again, just changed slightly. I think the same can be said for music. The fact that we have genres to classify music into shows that the music within these genres are built on common conventions used throughout the genre, which the genre is characterized by.

If you are desperate, create your own genre of music xD
#26
Quote by AtomicBirdy
I agree... though you'd be surprised how many eople live and die playing one type of music. I know many people who exclusively listen rock and won't even touch blues/jazz/classical.


yeah,i was 1 of those people a few years back,just listened to metal and my playing was boring as batshit,i still listen to metal but i love blues,rock,country,i rarely come up with metal stuff now,my playing is more open and original now.
#27
Two words : odd times
by the time you read this you will be wasting your time because it doesnt say anything
#28
Quote by Sean0913
You're going to be influenced by what you spend your time listening to and absorbing. If you want different then change what you listen to. Cause all you can hear and think of is inspired from what you listen to.

Sean


spot on buddy,thats how i roll,i dont try and emulate my fave bands but sometimes when i play they all come out in spicks and specks somewhere,when u pick up guitar u should never limit yourself
#29
Quote by ElConky
I get the point but I am pretty sure you have no idea how to play anything you just told that guy to learn. Indian religious music...yeah ok sure buddy.

What's that got to do with the price of kidneys? If you got to the doctor with chest pains and he tells you that you have to quit smoking, but he smokes himself, does that mean his medical opinion is invalid?

I can and do play that stuff, though. Although I have a lot of trouble with Carnatic music, because it uses the just intonation system. It takes a lot of weird quarter-step bends to stay on key. And I freely admit it took some editing tricks to make music in π/4 time.
Money beats soul every time.

Money beats soul...every time.

Money...beats soul...every...goddamn...time.
#30
Jim Jarmusch is a director who did films like Stranger than Paradise, Down by Law, Night on Earth, Ghost Dog, Coffee and Cigarettes.

Huge fan of Tom Waits, old blues, Neil Young, Avant Garde NY Jazz grainy odd B&W films.

There are infinite possibilities with music. You just have o stop listening to conventional commercial stuff and open your ears.

Tuvan throat singing.

Bulgarian Wedding Music

Indonesian Gamelan music

West African talking drum

Afro-Cuban jazz

New Orleans second line marching band rhythms

Hungarian folk songs

Pan flute from the Andes

early Renaissance Opera

Paraguayan Flamenco

Turkish vocal and percussion music

Mazurka, Polonaise, Bhangra dance

Mississippi drum and fife music

For everything you have ever heard, there are another million things you have not. There are varieties of music that you and I have never even heard of. Dances and folk melodies for countries that we could not find on a map that will twist the ear and allow you to hear things you never dreamed. There are instruments (e.g. kora, didgeridoo, hurdy gurdy, iktar, duduk) that you have never heard. Melodies that are totally foreign. Rhythms that are astoundingly new. Composers pushing the envelope.

Forget commercial music for a little while and try to listen to something totally new to your ears.