#1
I play mostly blues and im fairly at it. Probably intermediate if i had to class myself since ive been playing for about a year. I watched the king of the blues competition recently so i decided to join next year. That means i have to take my playing to another level which is obviously earned through practice. What exactly should i be practicing for blues though since its mostly about feel and emmotion?

This is the style im going for by the way. And thats the same backing track im going to use when i join the competition.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UuSOWe5HcA
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr


There are three places: "where you were", "where you are" and "where you want to be".


Story of my life
Last edited by -Kr0n1c- at Jun 17, 2011,
#2
What genre are you playing? Blues has many sub genres.

And master pents and 12 bars as best you can. Learn more sophisticated blues songs which break outside of a 12 bar and use extended chords and such. Winin' Boy Blues is a pretty good one for that so long as you can figure it out (it's a new orleans blues standard - pretty good and fairly jazzy). Make your playing as clean as possible. Being able to actually use the b5 in a blues scale properly is pretty useful as well, as few players seem to know how to use it effectively.

Edit: other good songs to study are

They're Red Hot
Stormy Monday
Tightrope
Traveling Riverside Blues

You may not necessarily want to play any of those for the thing, but they will improve your playing if you learn them well.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Jun 17, 2011,
#3
Start drinking, hitchhiking and spend all your money on hookers. Then write songs about doing so.

But seriously, learn some Robert Johnson tunes if you haven't already. It'll give you some turnaround and chord ideas. Seriously, any one of his songs is a complete headf**k to learn.
#4
Quote by Banjocal
What genre are you playing? Blues has many sub genres.

And master pents and 12 bars as best you can. Learn more sophisticated blues songs which break outside of a 12 bar and use extended chords and such. Winin' Boy Blues is a pretty good one for that so long as you can figure it out (it's a new orleans blues standard - pretty good and fairly jazzy). Make your playing as clean as possible. Being able to actually use the b5 in a blues scale properly is pretty useful as well, as few players seem to know how to use it effectively.

Edit: other good songs to study are

They're Red Hot
Stormy Monday
Tightrope
Traveling Riverside Blues

You may not necessarily want to play any of those for the thing, but they will improve your playing if you learn them well.


i just added the link to the style i want to play
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr


There are three places: "where you were", "where you are" and "where you want to be".


Story of my life
#7
Listen to other bluesmen, practice your scales, develop a feeling for what you're playing. Tune those bends. Make it howl. Learn when to make it scream and when to have it lull itself to sleep. Loop a 12-bar and hammer away. Change keys, learn the sounds of them. Get a grip of the blue note on the scale and use it accordingly. Be dynamic.

EDIT: Just checked out the link. You'll want to look into Gary Moore - he's definitely going to help you in that direction. Such as this, look into the solo.
Look!

Learn how to spell, grammar is your friend

Member #11 of the Les Paul owners club, pm Waterboy799 to join.

Blues player of the Laney Cult
Last edited by Garci at Jun 17, 2011,
#8
Get laid off at your job and pick up a guitar. Play the same A minor pentatonic shape and bend everywhere and let your pain flow into the bend. You're now as famous as BB King.
#9
Quote by -Kr0n1c-
i just added the link to the style i want to play

look at funk and maybe a bit of smoother jazz. try something like street life by the crusaders, and also look at some slightly rockier blues like Gerry Rafferty but only sparingly. The link you posted wasn't just using pents so learn the minor scale if you haven't already.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#10
Listen to blues singers and replicate their lines in your playing.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#11
Quote by Garci
Listen to other bluesmen, practice your scales, develop a feeling for what you're playing. Tune those bends. Make it howl. Learn when to make it scream and when to have it lull itself to sleep. Loop a 12-bar and hammer away. Change keys, learn the sounds of them. Get a grip of the blue note on the scale and use it accordingly. Be dynamic.

EDIT: Just checked out the link. You'll want to look into Gary Moore - he's definitely going to help you in that direction. Such as this, look into the solo.



yea, he really matches my style. So what should i be doing, watching these guitarist play and understand what theyre doing as inspiration?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr


There are three places: "where you were", "where you are" and "where you want to be".


Story of my life
#12
Quote by -Kr0n1c-
yea, he really matches my style. So what should i be doing, watching these guitarist play and understand what theyre doing as inspiration?

Well, you could start by looking not only at what he's playing, but also how. When does he bend the notes? What's going on in the background? Learn that, and use it in your improvisation. Watch his vibrato - it's a huge part of what he's doing, that adds a lot of colour to his playing. Don't just take "inspiration", learn from them. Take some licks from him, and try to use them in your next improvisation, add them to your vocabulary. There's a lot to be learned in how he switches the pentatonic boxes as well.
Look!

Learn how to spell, grammar is your friend

Member #11 of the Les Paul owners club, pm Waterboy799 to join.

Blues player of the Laney Cult
#13
Quote by Garci
Well, you could start by looking not only at what he's playing, but also how. When does he bend the notes? What's going on in the background? Learn that, and use it in your improvisation. Watch his vibrato - it's a huge part of what he's doing, that adds a lot of colour to his playing. Don't just take "inspiration", learn from them. Take some licks from him, and try to use them in your next improvisation, add them to your vocabulary. There's a lot to be learned in how he switches the pentatonic boxes as well.


thanks for the help man, ill try that out
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr


There are three places: "where you were", "where you are" and "where you want to be".


Story of my life
#14
The only way to practise blues is to play the blues.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.