#1
I'm having a problem with singing in tune. I can sing a major scale perfectly without any mistakes but when it comes to singing singing there's always some pitchy problems. Earlier I was singing along to the Glee version of Valerie and decided to record it to see what my voice sounded like. It was total shit, except for a few spots.
So mainly what I'm asking is how to get better at singing in tune.
talk to me
and i better not hear a word
do me baby
i better not feel it girl
i still got one bullet left in my nine
finna do a love crime
love crime
finna do a love crime

lovecrimes -- frank ocean

Tumblr
#3
Chromatic tuner? That's what I do.
I'm so happy. I get to eat a muffin.
Quote by space aids
You are so happy to eat a muffin it's kinda scary.
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Goes around tryina light dudes on fire.
Quote by MakinLattes
Too much Sublime.

I tell a lie, there is no such thing.
#4
The teacher is best if you don't hear what you sing. It may sound stupid, not hearing what you sing yourself. But you mostly hear what you want to hear when singing, not your actual voice.

You recorded yourself singing the major scale? If you say you sing it perfectly check it first by recording it. If it is correct as you say, just don't stop singing. Mind your breathing! I got the advice singing very loud with very loud music.

If you really want to be good I suggest taking lessons too. Singing has its techniques too and you never are able to hear what your voice really sounds.
lalala
#5
Yeah I had to sing the major scale to my teacher for a sight singing/ear training class and it was perfect but not the minor scales. I really suck at those. I do need help with breath control too. i guess I should take lessons. I recorded my regular talking voice and it sounded nothing like what it sounds like when I'm talking. It's much more raspier in recordings.
talk to me
and i better not hear a word
do me baby
i better not feel it girl
i still got one bullet left in my nine
finna do a love crime
love crime
finna do a love crime

lovecrimes -- frank ocean

Tumblr
#6
Quote by Fearless(Times)
Yeah I had to sing the major scale to my teacher for a sight singing/ear training class and it was perfect but not the minor scales. I really suck at those. I do need help with breath control too. i guess I should take lessons. I recorded my regular talking voice and it sounded nothing like what it sounds like when I'm talking. It's much more raspier in recordings.

If you want to perform lessons will be needed. And as I said: you only hear what you want to hear.

Just a fact: You hear an echo when talking/singing. Your head will slightly vibrate with the air and your vocal cords making your eardrums vibrate too which will be interpreted as a sound by your brains. Together with your actual voice (but even those are only reflections) it will sound a lot different than you always thought it was.

So don't mind it sounds different than you think it is. That's your real voice (regarding the quality of the microphone and when holding in a correct position of course) and everyone feels that same way about his own recorded voice
lalala
#7
I've recently started singing and taking lessons for them.

A few months back when I first started trying to sing along with my songs, I thought I was a great singer. This was until I sung for my wife and she was cringing. I figured she must be crazy, it sounds on tune except for a few parts. So I decided to record myself using a cheap headset mic. I was horrified. How could it sound that bad because when I sing it sounds fine? So I decided to do a few things:

1. Sign up for vocal lessons a month ago.
2. Purchase a condenser mic and a USB interface.

The vocal lessons are a big help. People think singing is a natural talent.. either you have it or you don't. Which is not true. Sure, some people are blessed, but for the rest of us, we have to work on it just like practicing your guitar. You didn't pick up your guitar one day and play perfectly, on time at full speed with no practice. Vocals are no different - you need to work on them, years and years of practice to be considered a "good singer." I'm told at least 6 months to be considered acceptable, but it ranges from person to person.

The proper condenser mic and USB interface allows me to properly record myself in to cubase LE and play it back. I can hear what I sound like to others and try to work on my repertoire when not working on the technical exercises.

Also, don't record yourself on a cheap headset mic and think that's really what you sound like. Sure, you probably don't sound as good as what you do in your head when you sing, but the cheap headset mic doesn't have the proper range and recording quality a good dynamic or condenser mic has. Get a proper mic to properly record yourself.. this is important.
Searching for the perfect gear is endless. Buying a better amp you may notice how shitty your guitar is and vice versa. I've spent thousands of dollars in pursuit of the perfect sound, which I'll never completely capture. -B. Corgan
Last edited by binaryclock at Jun 20, 2011,