Looking to get my first drumkit, not sure if I should go electric or acoustic

#1
Hey all, I'm a guitarist who has decided that he would like to learn the drums. However, I am not sure exactly how I should go about making my first purchase.

First off, my budget is right around 500 dollars, however I would prefer to possibly spend closer to 300 dollars at the most.

Also, I am going to be a junior in college this fall so I am living in an apartment. Now, I could definitely fit a standard sized kit no problem, the only thing to consider is 1) I have to be able to transport the kit there, and 2) My apartment is set up more like a hotel/ dorm style, so I obviously can't make too much noise. There is really no way for me to find out if an acoustic set can be muffled enough (Not counting with practice pads) through the walls until I would actually be able to move in and ask my next door neighbors how bad it is. Also, my old band's practice place was the other guitarist's apt, and the drums were muffled enough when you stood outside his main door in the hallway but he lived at the end of the hall and the wall next to the drumset does not connect to another apartment.


So could someone recommend the best way to find a cheap yet decent drumkit (I read the sticky, so I plan on using craigslist/ebay etc, but if there's any more obscure ideas then I welcome them), and if an electronic or acousic set would be better for my needs? Is an electronic kit not compare to an acoustic when it comes to learning how to properly play drums?
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#2
With an electronic kit, your obviously going to be able to experiment with more sounds and it will probably be more enjoyable to play. But equally your going to get a better deal buying an acoustic kit (mostly cheap electric drumsets are not that great).

You'd get away with an acoustic kit if you had silencer pads in all the drums, maybe fill the bass drum with pillows as well. There isn't going to be to much of a difference in feel because I doubt you'd have an opportunity to play without the silencers in an apartment.

In your situation, I'd probably lean towards the electric drums. It'll take up less space, be less noisy and you'll probably enjoy playing more actually being able to hear the drums properly.
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#3
Quote by Skinny91
With an electronic kit, your obviously going to be able to experiment with more sounds and it will probably be more enjoyable to play. But equally your going to get a better deal buying an acoustic kit (mostly cheap electric drumsets are not that great).

You'd get away with an acoustic kit if you had silencer pads in all the drums, maybe fill the bass drum with pillows as well. There isn't going to be to much of a difference in feel because I doubt you'd have an opportunity to play without the silencers in an apartment.

In your situation, I'd probably lean towards the electric drums. It'll take up less space, be less noisy and you'll probably enjoy playing more actually being able to hear the drums properly.


This man is correct, and not a stupid e-drum hater. And there is no difference in playing an acoustic kit and an electric kit, other than how it feels when the stick hits the drum, because they're different materials. I play both. I like e-drums better.
#4
I am also a guitarist who started playing drums about a year ago, I bought an acoustic drum kit, however I don't have to worry about the sound travelling, electric kits are good if you want to play quieter because obviously you can change the volume on an amp... However I prefer play on an acoustic kit as it feels more natural, just like I prefer playing acoustic guitar... Anyway, my friend had a similar problem and he bought a Drum cage, these are pretty useful as they do stop the sound from travelling... But that's if you're willing to pay a bit extra for a drum cage... Also as a beginner drummer you may struggle with the tuning on an acoustic kit... So my advice is start with an electric kit and then maybe in a couple of years get an acoustic once you don't have to worry about the sound
#5
I am a stupid E drum hater, but I'm also practical. In your situation you should go with an E drum set. Not only does it give you the option of playing quietly, but it'll also give you the advantage of a having a full kit with good tone. Acoustic kits, on a budget, tend not to sound great and cymbals alone will push you over budget. You can't play drums without a good hi hand and ride and those will cost around 500 and then you still have to buy the rest of the kit.

Go with an e drum set and when you have a bit of money and space sell it and get a proper set.
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#6
You're going to be in a college dorm (what we would probably call a "halls of residence" in britain amirite?). To be honest having had to live in one of those places for 3 months and continually pissed off by dickhead pisshead students who continually come back at 3 in the morning (that's when Manchester's drink licenses expire) going "WHEEYYYY" as loud as they can I would be tempted to get an acoustic set and play it just to piss people off at times but then again if you actually want to practice drums i would say the E kit is the best option.
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#7
Lol...4 days ago I bought an acoustic kit and returned it yesterday because it was too loud for a house. If you live in an apartment definitely go for the electric. You'd be stretching your budget through...
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#8
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This man is correct, and not a stupid e-drum hater. And there is no difference in playing an acoustic kit and an electric kit, other than how it feels when the stick hits the drum, because they're different materials. I play both. I like e-drums better.


You're overlooking the positioning of pads and toms... The way I've seen it happen, going from an acoustic kit to an electric tends to be a lot easier than going from an electric to acoustic.

OT, I say go for an e-kit, maybe a Roland TD-3? They're pretty decent but I still think that a good, realistic sounding e-kit will cost you an arm and a leg i.e. A Roland TD-12 or TD-20
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#9
Id love to say acoustic because I just love them. But it kinda depends on your style too.

I play a lot of jazz drums so I could get away with playing an acoustic kit pretty quietly, however if you wanted to learn death metal drums, you may want to go electric. Especailly given your circumstances.
#10
if your on a low budget i suggest acoustic. it might not get you the best sound but it will get you the feel
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#11
I've played drums since I was 8 years old, and I'm 34, now. I used to always have a prejudice again electronic sets. Then, I sat down and gave it an objective try. I'm hopelessly addicted to e-drums, now.

I traded my Sonor acoustic set, for a Roland TD-3. I can play as hard as I want, whenever I want, and the only noise that comes from it is "pitter-pat," because I have headphones plugged into it. The sounds are 99% realistic. I can plug it into an amp, just as easily as guitarists plug into their amps. Every drum is always in perfect tune. Never have to worry about heads splitting or going out of tune. I can plug into a recorder, and never have to worry about microphone levels or positioning or setup.

Also, for the folks that say they're wildly expensive, for a good set, (Roland or Yamaha,) they usually are... new. Type in "electronic drum" or "Roland" into the search engine of your local Craigslist. You can usually get a good used set for about $400-$500 USD.

If you're looking to play live, ya gotta go acoustic, unless you're willing to take a bunch sh** from people, about using an electric set on stage. But, if you looking for a set that has programs like a built-in metronome, and programs that teach you how to play drums, go electric. (I highly recommend any Roland, but Yamaha's pretty good, too.)

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Last edited by ***Hydra*** at Jul 1, 2011,