#1
I'm looking to improve my lead playing, and I'm really into bands like trivium and sylosis.
What sort of scales/techniques/practice exercises should I start doing/learning?

Thanks, Danny
Gear
Epiphone Sg special <---meh

Peavey Vypyr 30 <---awesome

Hello
#2
minor scales (natural and harmonic). Technique wise trivium use a lot of sweep picking. but you should practice most technique's such as alternate picking, tapping etc. what i do is find songs i like that use the techniques i want to practice. here is a good thread for that sorta stuff:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1091788

its got songs that are good for practicing techniques in it.

Hope that helps

Dave
#3
also what sort of structure should i work on? like should I just run scales dead fast or...?
Gear
Epiphone Sg special <---meh

Peavey Vypyr 30 <---awesome

Hello
#4
You could start with alternate picking exercises with chromatics, also look at economy picking as well. Sweeping exercises could be chromatic to start just to work on syncing the hands together. There are tons of exercises out there.
As far as scales you should know all modes of the major scale and relative minors, harmonic minor and diminished. Then build out from there.
A great exercise instead of just running scales is to do a measure of quarters, then eights then triplets and then sixteenths. To a metronome of course.

All the best,
Joe
http://www.joepinnavaia.com
Techniques eBook
Last edited by Joe Pinnavaia at Jun 18, 2011,
#5
Scales = natural minor, harmonic minor, phrygian and phrygian dominant.

Exercises : Click the exercises/songs for technique sticky.
#6
Quote by bigman123
I'm looking to improve my lead playing, and I'm really into bands like trivium and sylosis.
What sort of scales/techniques/practice exercises should I start doing/learning?

Thanks, Danny

Scales aren't going to help you much here. Look at how they construct their solos. Matt does a lot of straight scalar runs and he uses pentatonics and bends like a blues guitarist on heroin. Corey does similar scalar runs, but he also tends to incorporate a fair amount of melody into his solos. He's got a bit more of a neoclassical flair and uses more arpeggios (sweeping and tapping) than Matt does.