#1
I've been playing guitar for a year now and have neglected ear training, but I just don't know where to start. Should I be trying to know chords, intervals, or maybe just trying to figure out songs by ear? I know they are pretty much necessarry to learn, but I'm just looking for a good place to start and where to progress from there.
#2
Start with intervals and trying to figure out riffs by ear. Once you're more comfortable with recognising intervals, move onto chords.
#3
Work out a bunch of songs by ear, nothing complicated to begin with. I personally feel that actively learning intervals and ear training is a waste of time and here's why....

- the more you work stuff out by ear you'll gain an ability to recognise pitches more and more accurately
- simply by playing and taking in what you play, you'll work up a subconscious knowledge of pitch
- intervals are *fairly* useless in that if you learned nothing else, all you know is the distance between two notes, instead learn where intervals fit into the rest of music.

I've never actively sought to do ear training or anything like that, but i can tune my guitar to whatever i want without a tuner. I can tune in the middle of a song by just knowing what each string should sound like in relation to every other note on the fretboard.


TL : DR

If you're not naturally able to recognise pitches and stuff, i'd recommend deliberately making your guitar out of tune and play along to stuff. Then tune up and play it in perfect tuning, then detune and go again etc etc. You'll soon recognise that *something* isnt sounding right. By then, you're on your way to having a "good ear".
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#4
musictheory.com
Application that makes it even more easy to recognize intervals. First learn the names (too easy) then try out the interval app. If you got that (not the first week) try for the chords.

Other than that: if you listen to songs, try to sing the backing vocals instead of the lead. Try to sing the bass too. When playing chords (works better on piano), try to sing every separate note.

More advice: see W4T3V3R's reply
lalala
#5
Quote by Didii
musictheory.com
Application that makes it even more easy to recognize intervals. First learn the names (too easy) then try out the interval app. If you got that (not the first week) try for the chords.

Other than that: if you listen to songs, try to sing the backing vocals instead of the lead. Try to sing the bass too. When playing chords (works better on piano), try to sing every separate note.

More advice: see W4T3V3R's reply


That site didn't come up, but I'm actually pretty strong theory wise, my ear training is just very weak.
#6
Quote by W4T3V3R
Work out a bunch of songs by ear, nothing complicated to begin with. I personally feel that actively learning intervals and ear training is a waste of time and here's why....

- the more you work stuff out by ear you'll gain an ability to recognise pitches more and more accurately
- simply by playing and taking in what you play, you'll work up a subconscious knowledge of pitch
- intervals are *fairly* useless in that if you learned nothing else, all you know is the distance between two notes, instead learn where intervals fit into the rest of music.

I've never actively sought to do ear training or anything like that, but i can tune my guitar to whatever i want without a tuner. I can tune in the middle of a song by just knowing what each string should sound like in relation to every other note on the fretboard.


TL : DR

If you're not naturally able to recognise pitches and stuff, i'd recommend deliberately making your guitar out of tune and play along to stuff. Then tune up and play it in perfect tuning, then detune and go again etc etc. You'll soon recognise that *something* isnt sounding right. By then, you're on your way to having a "good ear".


I actually have untuned my guitar and tried to get it on occassion, and am able to get it fairly close. It's always a little sharp for some reason. And also, thanks, I have read a lot of people swear by intervals, so you've saved me a lot of time.
#7
Quote by alairson22
That site didn't come up, but I'm actually pretty strong theory wise, my ear training is just very weak.

He made a little mistake. It's musictheory.net
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#8
Quote by rockingamer2
He made a little mistake. It's musictheory.net

Thanx for correcting me

The site isn't for theory only. The exercises help a lot. Helped me succeeding an exam anyway
lalala
#10
Just try to learn songs by ear. listen to the songs first note, pause, search. Repeat until you have reached your goal.

Start on easy melodies like theme songs. Interval ear trainer never worked well for me. But if you was going to work with that i would try to find the notes on the guitar and figure out the interval then choose your answer on the program.
#11
Quote by alairson22
I've been playing guitar for a year now and have neglected ear training, but I just don't know where to start. Should I be trying to know chords, intervals, or maybe just trying to figure out songs by ear? I know they are pretty much necessarry to learn, but I'm just looking for a good place to start and where to progress from there.



best way to ear train is to figure out your favorite songs and solo's by ear. Simple as that. when you listen to the song try to pick out the bass guitar or hum the lowest note you can and find it on your guitar. Lots of times this will help you as all you then need to do is build the appropriate chord off of the note you found. For songs with riffs you have to just keep listening over and over.
Last edited by Appetite_4_GNR at Jun 20, 2011,
#12
Quote by alairson22
I've been playing guitar for a year now and have neglected ear training, but I just don't know where to start. Should I be trying to know chords, intervals, or maybe just trying to figure out songs by ear? I know they are pretty much necessarry to learn, but I'm just looking for a good place to start and where to progress from there.


If you are only a year into playing guitar, I don't think you've neglected anything. You're still learning guitar. I don't have recent memory of anyone that's played a year that I'd say "neglected ear training". If anything, ear training starts with being aware and familiar with pitch collections by playing them over and over and .....

You're barely getting started. Just keep learning the fundamentals. You'll always find something that you don't know yet, welcome to the club.

So, after a year what do you really know? In my observation, most players a year into it are still beginners, overall.

Unless you're some gifted wunderkid. In all the 600+ students I've taught, I've only had one of those.

Sean
#13
Quote by Sean0913

Unless you're some gifted wunderkid. In all the 600+ students I've taught, I've only had one of those.

Sean

Likewise dude... the kick in the pants is mine was 8 years old... or he was 7, can't remember. Made my jaw drop every lesson by how quickly he absorbed things and moved on. Sadly, he moved to Oz... sniff...

And I agree with the one who posted about Earmaster. Quite a brilliant program... not just notes but rhythms too... and wicked chord progressions. And like sean said... it wasn't neglected... you are moving steadily and its time now to do it. Good luck to ya
Last edited by evolucian at Jun 20, 2011,