#1
is there much of an advantage to learning other peoples songs?
Example,

Joe perry is one of my favourite guitarists and i learn some if his songs now and then and i learn other songs i happen to like the sound of, but when it comes to writing my own songs it sounds nothing like my "influences" and dont feel much better off for learning them.

Anyone else do that?

Is it better to always just noodle around on guitar and try writing your own stuff to play all the time??? and forget learning other peopls stuff??
#2
There's a difference between just learning how to play a song and learning a song.

If you want to do it properly, and implement some of that kind of style in your playing, you need to analyse the song, look at the chords, intervals, phrasing etc. and then try to apply them to your playing. Learning other people's songs is a good idea most of the time because it improves your technique and develops your style. First though, you need to look at what you're learning instead of just mindlessly playing it note for note.
#3
i agree with piszczel.

the only thing that is better to your playing is obviously more playing. obvious notes aside, ingraining someone else's style into yours will definitely make you a better player because it broadens and deepens your magical bag of guitar playing tricks. And being a good, cool guitar player is all about how many cool tricks you can pull from you cool magical guitar bag.
"Hey kid. You wanna cigarette?"


"No thanks! I/m already hooked on Fonicks!"

#4
My opinion goes strongly against that. As I said in other threads: no stuff you will ever come up to will be new. All is based on what you have learned/heard/felt before. Creativity is the way you combine those experiences.

I learned the most of music by writing down other people's songs (mostly chords). If you mean learning though as looking for a tab and try to play it from there you won't learn much as for writing (still it would help). Playing other people's songs by ear will benefit your hearing, your feeling with music, your improvise methods as well as your knowledge (for chords/melodies/techniques (for guitar/chord schemes/scales/...)/...). Those are necessary to improve your creativity.
lalala
#5
How does an author become a better writer?

By writing and reading more.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#6
Quote by rockingamer2
How does an author become a better writer?

By writing and reading more.


So the analogy is with listening, not learning to play songs.

Learning other people's songs will help your technique but it is a very inefficient way to expose yourself to different styles of music. You could listen to, and get to know by ear, fifty songs in the time it takes to learn to play one.

Beware that, for some beginners, learning to play a favourite song 'kills' it as a listening experience, partly because hearing it is associated with the frustration of learning to play it.

Start learning how to write your own songs from the start. No matter how bad they are at first Each one will be better than the last, and as your technique improves so will your songwriting skills.
#7
Quote by Jehannum
So the analogy is with listening, not learning to play songs.

Learning other people's songs will help your technique but it is a very inefficient way to expose yourself to different styles of music. You could listen to, and get to know by ear, fifty songs in the time it takes to learn to play one.

Beware that, for some beginners, learning to play a favourite song 'kills' it as a listening experience, partly because hearing it is associated with the frustration of learning to play it.

Start learning how to write your own songs from the start. No matter how bad they are at first Each one will be better than the last, and as your technique improves so will your songwriting skills.


I believe that as your ear improves from learning other peoples songs aurally, the players knowledge of the guitar and how to create sounds will improve also. All of the great players have a unique sound, which they achieved by listening to AND playing the music their idols. It's where you take/what you do to those influences that will define your music.
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#8
Quote by gary1991
is there much of an advantage to learning other peoples songs?
...



No.

To be truly original you have to learn nothing and invent everything on your own .. in fact you need to forget guitar and invent a new instrument -- something with strings that has bellows and a tire pressure gauge. It should pick up shortwave radio signals and have a storage area for flavored ice cubes.
#9
Yes.
You learn how other people write songs and how they think of the guitar. Learning someone else's song is like being able to follow someone else's train of thought. I am also an advocate for stealing elements of other people's songs. Sounds bad, but some of my best work has come form taking other peoples ideas and tweaking them.
Your lead playing will definitely benefit as well. I've retained alot of licks from solos I've learned over the years. Just yesterday I was thinking that I should start learning more to expand my guitar vocabulary.
#10
Quote by Jehannum
So the analogy is with listening, not learning to play songs.

Damn. I've been trying to find a way to make that analogy work. I think I got it now. I'll just wait for another "Should I learn other people's songs?" thread.

TS, learning other peoples songs helps put stuff in context and gives you ideas for your own songs.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#11
Quote by gary1991
is there much of an advantage to learning other peoples songs?



Yes there is.

the obvious..... skill development, inspiration.

It also gives you something to study should you decide to get into music theory.
shred is gaudy music
#12
learning many different variety songs can help you build some of the skill to compose your own music one day. Same theory as dancing, the more moves you learn, the more ideas you can get out of if you need to choreograph something in the future.
#14
Quote by primusfan
imitate. internalize. innovate.

Iterate.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#16
Personally, I've found that by learning songs by my favorite musicians, it not only makes learning fun, because who doesn't want to be able to play along with their favorite songs, but also expedites the process (you don't have to write a first, you can just grab some tabs and go) - but, it also challenges you to get better as, especially in the beginning, you're trying to learn stuff that you can't play, so it pushes you to get good enough to play it.

Like, I'm learning "Ghost", by Slash. I'm not fast enough to play that riff in the beginning, so I'm practicing it like a mofo, and gradually getting faster. A lot more rewarding than some boring scale exercise that'll do the same thing, methinks...