#1
Been wondering for a while what this scale is.....it seems like I use it a lot.

e|-----------------------------------------------------1--2--4---|
b|-------------------------------------------1--2--4-------------|
g|---------------------------------1--2--3-----------------------|
d|-----------------------1--3--4---------------------------------|
a|------------1--3--4--------------------------------------------|
E|--1--3--4------------------------------------------------------|
#2
Looks like Fminor, with an accidental Ab thrown in for good measure.
I can only listen to so many breakdowns and "spoken word" vocals before I wanna puke.

I find Jennette McCurdy attractive, but Elizabeth Gillies and Debby Ryan much more so.

That's enough, Djent people. We get it.
#3
It's not "a" scale, it's at least 2 scales mixed together... Going from the top you have root, maj 2, min 3rd, 4th, 5th, min 6th, min 7th, octave - which is natural minor.

Then you have MINOR 2nd, minor 3rd, major 3rd, 4th, 5th, minor 7th, root, minor 2nd, minor 3rd.

It's basically a cluster**** of natural minor and phygian, with a major 3rd thrown in there for no reason. Using this scale correctly would be quite hard, and I can't imagine you can do it sine you have to ask here.
#4
Quote by piszczel
and I can't imagine you can do it sine you have to ask here.


Mindfreak!

I know it's used in solos such as the "Sidewinder" solo from Avenged Sevenfold and I have indeed used it before in licks and riffs that pop in my head.

The only part of it that I'm unsure of is the low E string. I accumulated all the notes from things I've made up and the Sidewinder solo I mentioned. The low E was a complete shot in the dark with the exception of the third note.


EDIT: Idk if it makes a difference but you can take it up to the 5th fret.
Last edited by BoStros at Jun 18, 2011,
#5
Well that's the thing, a guitar player is not bound to one scale when playing a solo - a decent player will take note of the chord progression and play accordingly, it's not just about staying in key. Plus there's almost always some accidentals to add some flavour. I haven't heard the song but I'm willing to bet that the scale changes because the chord progression underneath it changes.
#6
Quote by piszczel
Well that's the thing, a guitar player is not bound to one scale when playing a solo - a decent player will take note of the chord progression and play accordingly, it's not just about staying in key. Plus there's almost always some accidentals to add some flavour. I haven't heard the song but I'm willing to bet that the scale changes because the chord progression underneath it changes.


Haha, I need and want to take music classes so I can understand this but if "chord progression" is as straight forward as it sounds The rhythm guitar plays the same 3 chord riff the entire solo. Yes, the solo doesn't stay in the same key but that's not the point. I've heard and apparently used this "scale" time and time again and I'm just curious as to what it is.


BTW -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mClEpWiTYkY
#8
Cool solo.

Without looking into the whole thing in too much detail (apart from listening to the song), sounds like hes just using accidentals for effect. Accidental is when you use a note that's not in the scale, but only as a passing note - you don't actually pause on it.

You can play literally the biggest chromatic nonsense that's not in any key followed by any random arpeggio or a melody and it will sound good - basically the bad notes are often used to make the good notes sound better. Also, sometimes it just doesn't matter that much, you can play few notes that are not in the scale, a lot of players do - if you're playing fast, it rarely matters if one or two notes are not in the scale, they're just there as filler.
#9
Quote by piszczel
Cool solo.

Without looking into the whole thing in too much detail (apart from listening to the song), sounds like hes just using accidentals for effect. Accidental is when you use a note that's not in the scale, but only as a passing note - you don't actually pause on it.

You can play literally the biggest chromatic nonsense that's not in any key followed by any random arpeggio or a melody and it will sound good - basically the bad notes are often used to make the good notes sound better. Also, sometimes it just doesn't matter that much, you can play few notes that are not in the scale, a lot of players do - if you're playing fast, it rarely matters if one or two notes are not in the scale, they're just there as filler.


That actually explains a lot about that solo. But why
#10
that's not the same scale. you can't just add the notes together like that. a song might use all 12 notes during the song with accidentals etc, but each section will be in a certain key and have certain chromatic notes thrown in. learn theory and try and analyse the solo, although that might be a goal for down the line.
#11
Quote by piszczel
Cool solo.

Without looking into the whole thing in too much detail (apart from listening to the song), sounds like hes just using accidentals for effect. Accidental is when you use a note that's not in the scale, but only as a passing note - you don't actually pause on it.

You can play literally the biggest chromatic nonsense that's not in any key followed by any random arpeggio or a melody and it will sound good - basically the bad notes are often used to make the good notes sound better. Also, sometimes it just doesn't matter that much, you can play few notes that are not in the scale, a lot of players do - if you're playing fast, it rarely matters if one or two notes are not in the scale, they're just there as filler.

Not quite.

An accidental is indeed a note taken from outside of a scale, but they aren't always simply passed over and ignored. Accidentals can be used for a lot of different things, from building tension for a big chord resolution to suggesting a modal flavor in a passage.

As for the bolded bit, accidentals are not the same as fudge notes. Accidentals are used intentionally for a given effect whereas fudged notes are just that: wrong notes. Playing fast doesn't give you more or less license to go outside of a scale and knowing what accidentals are doesn't give you free license to make mistakes and write them off as accidentals or modal notes.

In most situations with accidentals in rock and metal music, they are used to build tension between chord resolutions. One of the most common is the augmented seventh, used often in the harmonic minor scale. They can also be used to build towards key changes, though that is more common in progressive music in which key changes are more frequent than in less complex pieces. Accidentals are also occasionally used to suggest modes, though that is seen a lot more in fusion genres where there is a strong jazz or classical component as opposed to simply rock or metal music.

I haven't analyzed this solo too much, but having listened to it, any accidentals are likely being used to add a certain flavor to a part if at all. The major third, when added to the phrygian bit, will give an "exotic" flavor and suggest a major chord resolution. It creates tension because that major third is not normally found in the phrygian scale, so it is a "wrong note". That it is used creates tension because your ear thinks it's not supposed to be there, to put things simply. By doing that, the resolution to the A chord (I believe it's a G# note that's the accidental) sounds a lot "better" or more natural by comparison.
#12
Quote by gavk
that's not the same scale. you can't just add the notes together like that. a song might use all 12 notes during the song with accidentals etc, but each section will be in a certain key and have certain chromatic notes thrown in. learn theory and try and analyse the solo, although that might be a goal for down the line.


I didn't accumulate these notes from that solo alone. I noticed that I often see and use this "pattern" of notes in many songs and riffs.

I even discovered you can play the tune of "What Child Is This" using this pattern. I'll post an example of these notes capabilities in a second...
#13
Quote by BoStros
I didn't accumulate these notes from that solo alone. I noticed that I often see and use this "pattern" of notes in many songs and riffs.

I even discovered you can play the tune of "What Child Is This" using this pattern. I'll post an example of these notes capabilities in a second...


That's because What Child is This is based on the minor scale, with an accidental in the last bar. A scale is a sequence of notes that repeats over and over again... in your tab you have the F minor scale written out followed by what's basically the F minor scale with accidentals included. If it was an actual scale those accidentals would be found in the first octave anyway.

Besides, what you're really missing here is that you don't need to create awesome new scales to get the sounds you want. You've found something you think sounds cool and all it essentially is is the F minor scale with accidentals added. If anything I think more people should try and approach writing and improvising this way, makes a hell of a lot more sense to me than trying to figure out the D# Byzantine Altered scale or whatever because the major and minor scales are just too dull.
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#14
if you subtract the A, then you have 3 scales:
C# Japanese Ichikosucho
D# Bebop Minor
G# Bebop Dominant

i only know that because this site told me =D really great site!
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/reverse_scales.php
#15
Alrighty kids,

Chord progression: Dm C Bb C

Key: D minor

Scale: D minor with accidentals
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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