#1
i saw on a thread here tha said dont tremolo pick by using your elbow, i find that impossible to do your elbow to pick anyway without struming all the strings, so maybe im not understanding what it actually means.


i know this sounds abit stuiped but i just want to make sure that iam actually using my wrist to tremolo pick.
#2
I think they're basically saying you should use your wrist only, not your bicep and arm. If your arm is tensing up and you're using your arm muscles, you're doing it wrong. So I think you're right.
#3
I think he means don't use yore entire arm to tremolo pick. If yore wondering if yore doing this, look at yore arm when yore playing and see if it's vibrating.
#4
ok im doing it wrong then, i shouldnt really use my "wrist" to tremolo pick, but use my thumb instead in a way, right?
#5
wait no now im confused (sorry for double posting)

i just dont get it im using my wrist but my arm is kind of vibrating with the way im use to but when do the way im using other way my forearm is tensed and wrist hurts after.


my tremolo picking is like this guys

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsPKxAII33I
Last edited by harvestkingx at Jun 18, 2011,
#6
Quote by harvestkingx
wait no now im confused (sorry for double posting)

i just dont get it im using my wrist but my arm is kind of vibrating but when do the other way my forearm is tensed and wrist hurts after.


Then yore tremolo picking just like me. I think you are, in fact, picking with yore elbow, but I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing. However, I am not completely certain that I understand what is meant by tremolo picking with yore elbow.
#7
I'll muddy the waters more. Many "flatpickers", that is to say, folks that play bluegrass or bluegrass-influenced music both on guitar and mandolin find that it's essentially necessary to "pick from the elbow" when doing very fast single-note runs on an acoustic guitar.

Most guitars set up for such playing have medium-gauge strings and rather high action and require a good deal of effort to play. There's no way to handle high-speed tremolo with just wrist action.
Most all the great players in this style talk about "digging in" and playing from the elbow.

When I'm playing the standard bluegrass/country "boom-chicka-boom" strumming pattern, it all comes from the wrist. The forearm sort of rotates with the wrist motion.
However, when I'm trying to do very fast single-note runs, the motion changes. The wrist becomes rigid, the fingers holding the pick become rigid, and the forearm moves vertically up and down from the elbow.
Watch mandolin players doing tremolo on YouTube... It's essentially the standard technique.
#8
What you guys are doing is tensing up your arms because you have not learned it the normal way (building up without any muscle tension, 100% from the wrist = takes a loooong time).

I did it that way and I developed tendinitis in my shoulder, worst 6 months of my life....
Last edited by Larz89 at Jun 18, 2011,
#9
Quote by thrashdeth
Then yore tremolo picking just like me. I think you are, in fact, picking with yore elbow, but I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing. However, I am not completely certain that I understand what is meant by tremolo picking with yore elbow.


my tremolo picking is sorta like what hes oing

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsPKxAII33I
Last edited by harvestkingx at Jun 18, 2011,
#11
Quote by Bikewer
I'll muddy the waters more. Many "flatpickers", that is to say, folks that play bluegrass or bluegrass-influenced music both on guitar and mandolin find that it's essentially necessary to "pick from the elbow" when doing very fast single-note runs on an acoustic guitar.

Most guitars set up for such playing have medium-gauge strings and rather high action and require a good deal of effort to play. There's no way to handle high-speed tremolo with just wrist action.
Most all the great players in this style talk about "digging in" and playing from the elbow.

When I'm playing the standard bluegrass/country "boom-chicka-boom" strumming pattern, it all comes from the wrist. The forearm sort of rotates with the wrist motion.
However, when I'm trying to do very fast single-note runs, the motion changes. The wrist becomes rigid, the fingers holding the pick become rigid, and the forearm moves vertically up and down from the elbow.
Watch mandolin players doing tremolo on YouTube... It's essentially the standard technique.

You keep saying this, and it's still wrong. It is NEVER necessary to pick from the elbow. It's bad technique, plain and simple - the reasons it's bad are because you inherenently have less control over your elbow, it's designed for power and large motions, not intricate work. That means the only way to get it to move in a small enough arc is to tense it up and playing with excess tension will damage your arm over time. This isn't a matter of opinion, it's a physiological reality - just because other people do it doesn't change that fact.

Likewise if that's what you do then like it or not you have bad technique too, and also run the risk of developing a problem in your arm in the years to come. There should be no difference in your picking action regardless of the speed you're playing at, nor does there ever need to be. Your wrist is perectly capable of picking at whatever speed you care to play at, however whether or not you've learned how to use it is a different matter.
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#12
Well, I've been playing this way since about 1976, and at age 65, see no ill effects. Check out video Doc Watson or Sam Bush playing at speed.
Likewise, anyone playing tremolo-intensive instruments like mandolin, bouzouki, or balalaika.
#13
Allot of us are guilty of it, including me, using movement from the elbow sintead of the wrist to strum or pick notes.
Its a bad habit to break.
Picking from the elbow for once looks stupid, and after a while your elbow gets sore.
I can't go very fast without automatically elbow picking.
Meh.
LEARN EARLY.
METAL!
#14
Quote by steven seagull
You keep saying this, and it's still wrong. It is NEVER necessary to pick from the elbow. It's bad technique, plain and simple - the reasons it's bad are because you inherenently have less control over your elbow, it's designed for power and large motions, not intricate work. That means the only way to get it to move in a small enough arc is to tense it up and playing with excess tension will damage your arm over time. This isn't a matter of opinion, it's a physiological reality - just because other people do it doesn't change that fact.

Likewise if that's what you do then like it or not you have bad technique too, and also run the risk of developing a problem in your arm in the years to come. There should be no difference in your picking action regardless of the speed you're playing at, nor does there ever need to be. Your wrist is perectly capable of picking at whatever speed you care to play at, however whether or not you've learned how to use it is a different matter.



+1