#1
Hey, I was just wondering if there were any cons to using one vs. having it directly screwed to the guitar. Seems the extra lift off the body from that plate would have some kind of effect? Thanks
#3
The strings end up a little higher. So you decrease the break angle off the bridge quite a bit. That's really the only con I can think of. I have never heard any other complaint than that.
If you start a reply with: I have never played one but I have heard good things about it! Your opinion is invalid.
#4
Makes sense. What kind of effect on sound and playability does the break angle have on the guitar?
#5
Ive got one on my Tele. Its great. No sound difference really and I didn't notice any playability difference. If anything it will give you a little more vibrato since it is a little higher up.

What kind of guitar are you looking at getting it on?
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#6
A 339. Kinda funny because the previous owner had a bigsby removed from it, the screw holes were filled in by the strap, strangely enough there are no screw holes on the top. I don't get why there'd be screw holes on the bottom but not the top? Anyways, I bought it from a guitar shop online the other day, so I still haven't seen it in person yet; it doesn't ship out till Monday.

I don't plan on removing the bigsby ever so I doubt I'll be getting a vibramate. Still need to try the guitar out, but I don't think I'll be reselling it in the future either. I was just curious.
Last edited by danleary at Jun 19, 2011,
#7
A pro to using the vibramate it if its going on a hollowbody it will bolt into the stop pegs instead of being held on buy the strings and the strap button screws. this will actually give you more sustain.
#8
he could have very well used a vibro-mate.
or maybe some kind of conversion trapeze tailpiece.

I've thought about doing that to one of my guitars.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer