#1
Hey guys, quick question, Say im playing a C major scale, and used the Ionian mode from the F note in the major scale and imrpovised into the f major and into any note from there with the right mode, well is that how you do it, or am i missing something? and also if it is does the band have to switch key or can they stay in the same key, thanks guys much love and peace
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#2
Don't worry about it. Play what sounds good. It'll be a long time before you come to really "get" modes, and when you do you'll never want to use them because they're impractical and rare.
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#3
Modes are dependant on what you play and what you play over. If you have a progression in C (lets say a I vi ii V), and you play an F major scale, you would be playing in C mixolydian. This is because the only note different is the Bb, and that is what gives the mixolydian mode its characteristic tone (a dominant seventh).
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#4
well a mode is just the scale played with a different accented note. so like C major is C D E F G A B F LYDIAN is F G A B C D E. U can change to F major, but thats a key change. And if you want it to sound good, yes the band would have to play something in F major too.
#5
The best advice you're gonna get on the topic:
Stay away from modes. There are better things you can spend your time trying to understand
#6
Quote by TK1
Modes are dependant on what you play and what you play over. If you have a progression in C (lets say a I vi ii V), and you play an F major scale, you would be playing in C mixolydian. This is because the only note different is the Bb, and that is what gives the mixolydian mode its characteristic tone (a dominant seventh).

So basically modes all depends on the chords/progressions your playing over, and are kind of like bridges to other musical scales to play with in that same key?
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#7
Quote by ripdime04
So basically modes all depends on the chords/progressions your playing over, and are kind of like bridges to other musical scales to play with in that same key?

Well, when the ABCDEFG system as introduced, that's all there was. Just those 7 notes, in that one key. It wasn't 'til later that people came up with Bb and C# and all those other keys, so every thing was in C Major and it's modes. By chance, two of those modes became really really popular, and are the basis of most music we know today, and that is the Major scale and the Minor scale.

If you're playing with only the notes of C Major, you're using no notes that couldn't be said to be A Minor (or all the other modes of C Major, i.e. G mixolydian, D Dorian, and F Lydian), so what's the difference?

It's all about context. Really, there's no sure way to say "That's whatever mode", but if you spend some time on it you start to hear the differences. Playing lead from the key of C Major over, say, a vamped G Dominant chord will be G Mixolydian, especially if you resolve the lead to G notes, mainly. The Mixolydian has a major sound but it's more upbeat and bluesy than the Ionian (major) mode, and always makes me think of hippies. All the modes have their own vibes which need to be described and demonstrated in person to understand completely, I think.

Personally I don't think you should think of them as modes, but rather as separate scales altogether, but other would probably disagree.

This will probably help because I can't really think how to put this concept into words. I was taught by an actual factual person so it was easy for me. http://www.guitarshredshow.com/carpet/
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#9
Quote by TK1
Modes are dependant on what you play and what you play over. If you have a progression in C (lets say a I vi ii V), and you play an F major scale, you would be playing in C mixolydian. This is because the only note different is the Bb, and that is what gives the mixolydian mode its characteristic tone (a dominant seventh).


if you had a progression in C, you would be playing in C. sorry, bro, looks like you don't get modes, either. you have a B natural in that progression -- you would just be playing C major, throwing in a Bb as an accidental where you saw fit. not modal.

Quote by ripdime04
So basically modes all depends on the chords/progressions your playing over, and are kind of like bridges to other musical scales to play with in that same key?


kind of. the first part is right -- the use of a mode depends completely on your resolution and the background harmony. as far as that "bridges" thing goes, not really. if you're in a key, you play in that key. if you're in C major, you play in C major. there will never be D dorian, E phrygian, etc. without a modulation. never. you can throw in notes outside the key, but that has nothing to do with modes, and is not always indicative of a modulation.

my advice is to stay away from modes for now and study more tonal theory. keys, chords, and what have you. come back to them later.
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#10
thanks so much guys!
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#11
Quote by greeneyegat
The best advice you're gonna get on the topic:
Stay away from modes. There are better things you can spend your time trying to understand

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#12
Quote by rdobson2
?? Knowledge is power man,why not learn it all?

Because there's a lot of stuff you need to understand al;ready before you're in a position to make any sense of modes. Until you've got the foundations in place it's a waste of time bothering with them.
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#14
Quote by TheBurningFish
Well, when the ABCDEFG system as introduced, that's all there was. Just those 7 notes, in that one key. It wasn't 'til later that people came up with Bb and C# and all those other keys, so every thing was in C Major and it's modes. By chance, two of those modes became really really popular, and are the basis of most music we know today, and that is the Major scale and the Minor scale

where did you learn your history of music?
#15
Quote by amonamarthmetal
where did you learn your history of music?


+1. i missed that last time i was in this thread.

"Bb and C# and all those other keys" were well known to renaissance musicians. it's just that because of the tuning system, all keys were not equally in tune. usually, compositions were in a mode that had a key signature that was blank, had one sharp, or had one flat (so basically, C major, G major, and F major and any of their respective modes).
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#16
Quote by amonamarthmetal
where did you learn your history of music?

Evidently, a sub par book...
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#17
Quote by TheBurningFish
Evidently, a sub par book...


i mean, it's correct that the primary notes in use at that time were A, B, C, D, E, F, and G, and musicians made use of the modes therein. however, accidentals were well known to them -- even back then in a composition in D dorian, it was common practice to raise the C to a C# to lead to D at cadences (the forerunner of the melodic minor scale, by the way) -- and not only in dorian, but in mixolydian (similar to ionian at this point), and aeolian. it was not done in phrygian because the b2 already acted as the leading tone back to the tonic, and locrian was never used, so it was unnecessary there.

the most common accidental back then, however, was Bb -- so excluding the sharps used as leading tones, the primary musical alphabet was A, Bb, B, C, D, E, F, G (which is related to why the germans call B "H" and Bb "B" and don't do this for any other sharps or flats).

that's a pretty basic summary, though. if you want to learn more, your best best is to study some sixteenth century music.
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#18
Thanks for putting me straight
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.