#1
I've always wondered this.. Why is it that most guitar cabs are 4x12, and bass cabs are usually 4x10 (or 8x10, or some 15" configuration). My question is, why? Can someone please clear this up for me? Why is there so much more variety with bass cabinets.
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#2
smaller speakers are faster at responding to transients then bigger speakers but bigger speakers are better at moving air.

you can really get a guitar cab set up any way you want.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#4
no real reason other than that is what is what became popular through time. 12's have the right balance between speaker surface area (low end) and high end response that sounds good for guitar. back in the day you were more likely to see guitar cabs with 10's or 15's (they aren't completely extinct either), by the late 60's cab design started to become more streamlined.

that being said, there are many other factors that go into properly matching an instrument to a cab that has the right speakers and the right dimensions:

guitar cabs: are generally 8 or 16 ohms, open back designs are more common, speakers generally have looser parts. all this provides a cab with more response to dynamics without as much low end reproduction

bass cabs: are generally 4 or 8 ohm, almost exclusively closed back or ported that are more designed toward speaker specs, also speakers tend to have stiffer parts. speakers are generally wired in parallel to help increase the effective surface area of the speaker cones. this provides a cab with more low end response that can handle the higher powered bass amps without 'flubbing up' and losing definition.

4x10 bass cabs are especially cool because a port design, with lower impedance, wired in parallel makes a cab that is very effective producing low end while not giving up any high end response (15" speakers are great at producing low end, but too heavy and big at keeping higher freqs crisp). (note: speaker surface area is directly proportional to the wavelength able to be produced by a speaker, and impedance and cab size effects a speaker's resonance frequency which heavily effects it's frequency response)
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Last edited by gumbilicious at Jun 18, 2011,
#5
Quote by gumbilicious
no real reason other than that is what is what became popular through time. 12's have the right balance between speaker surface area (low end) and high end response that sounds good for guitar. back in the day you were more likely to see guitar cabs with 10's or 15's (they aren't completely extinct either), by the late 60's cab design started to become more streamlined.

that being said, there are many other factors that go into properly matching an instrument to a cab that has the right speakers and the right dimensions:

guitar cabs: are generally 8 or 16 ohms, open back designs are more common, speakers generally have looser parts. all this provides a cab with more response to dynamics without as much low end reproduction

bass cabs: are generally 4 or 8 ohm, almost exclusively closed back or ported that are more designed toward speaker specs, also speakers tend to have stiffer parts. speakers are generally wired in parallel to help increase the effective surface area of the speaker cones. this provides a cab with more low end response that can handle the higher powered bass amps without 'flubbing up' and losing definition.

4x10 bass cabs are especially cool because a port design, with lower impedance, wired in parallel makes a cab that is very effective producing low end while not giving up any high end response (15" speakers are great at producing low end, but too heavy and big at keeping higher freqs crisp). (note: speaker surface area is directly proportional to the wavelength able to be produced by a speaker, and impedance and cab size effects a speaker's resonance frequency which heavily effects it's frequency response)

This is, in more learned terminology what I was about to post while simultaneously being easier to understand AND more thorough.
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

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