#1
I know that when I see a chord like:
F#/D,it means its a D chord with F# as base.
That makes sense because it there is an F# note in a D major triad.
So I can call it an inverted chord(can I?).
Applies with something like E/G#.

But how about something like:
G/F#?
There is no F# in a G major triad.
SO how can I play an F# in a G chord?

I thought there was a method to create chords(from scales).
What kind of method is applied here???
#3
You are on the right track.

G/F#: F# is the major 7 to G. if you put the G in the bass and put the F# on the high E it becomes a Gmaj7.

G A B C D E F# g
Root, minor 2nd, major 3rd, major 4th, dominant 5th, major 6th, major 7th, octave.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Jun 19, 2011,
#4
a slash chord
G/f# is a g with an F# as the bass so you just add it to the bass
a way to play it could be
e3
bo
go
do
a2
e2
edit forgot to mention it is a Gmaj7 chord
Last edited by supersac at Jun 19, 2011,
#5
Quote by Banjocal

G A B C D E F# g
Root, minor 2nd, major 3rd, major 4th, dominant 5th, major 6th, major 7th, octave.




It's major 2nd, major 3rd, perfect 4th, perfect 5th, major 6th, major 7th and perfect octave.
#6
Quote by nerdinator
I know that when I see a chord like:
F#/D,it means its a D chord with F# as base.
That makes sense because it there is an F# note in a D major triad.
So I can call it an inverted chord(can I?).
Applies with something like E/G#.

But how about something like:
G/F#?
There is no F# in a G major triad.
SO how can I play an F# in a G chord?

I thought there was a method to create chords(from scales).
What kind of method is applied here???

The note after the slash doesn't have to be a part of the chord before the slash. In fact, it is usually not a note from the chord
#7
F#/D is an F# major chord over a D bass note, not a D major over F#.
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#8
Quote by Elden G20
F#/D is an F# major chord over a D bass note, not a D major over F#.

Yes.Sorry I meant,D/F#
#9
Quote by hames jetfield
The note after the slash doesn't have to be a part of the chord before the slash. In fact, it is usually not a note from the chord

No,it can be as in E/G#

Thank You all!

Okay,so the thing is it is actually an inverted Gmaj7 chord,represented like something else.Correct?
#10
Your right, it should function as a Gmaj7 in third inversion.
Quote by dmtransmutation
What the Grunge-haters think is just mindless musical nonsense, in reality is the restoration of the old rule of harmony to not write an entire song in one tonality/key
#11
Thank You!!!

and...
sorry hames jetfield,
you are right,I didn't read your post correctly

"The note after the slash doesn't have to be a part of the chord before the slash. In fact, it is usually not a note from the chord"