#4
Quote by Fingerboy18
Perfect center.


I did this most of the time but the bass drum is kinda covering it up.

any suggestions?

I tried panning it to the left though and it went ok
#5
EQ the bass guitar and kick drum so that the dominant frequencies are different. Either that, or give the kick a narrow boost for example, and then give the bass a narrow cut at the same frequency.
#6
EQ indeed. I like to keep the kick dominant in the sub-50hz range and the bass more dominant in the range just above that
#7
Quote by xFilth
EQ indeed. I like to keep the kick dominant in the sub-50hz range and the bass more dominant in the range just above that


so bass around 60-65 ish? and then the kick around 50-55 hz?

Thanks....I really don't have a good enough understanding of recording a lot of instruments yet and eq so I just use a chart to know which frequencies are which.

So is better to boost something or cut something?

My problem with bass is it gets so buried in the mix but when I turn it up it's too overpowering.
Last edited by gothblade at Jun 19, 2011,
#8
^this, also maybe cut some lows in the guitar since that could be causing the problem as well
periphery/bulb!

gear:
Ibanez RG7321 w/ D-sonic in bridge

Peavey 5150 mk ii & b52 4x12 cab

line 6 podxt for recording

Quote by AsOneIStand
Head and Cab for $130? You don't need a head and cabinet, you need a psychological examination.
#9
Yeah, always hi-pass filter your guitars (when mixing with bass). I do it around 120hz
#10
Quote by nutinpwnsgibson
^this, also maybe cut some lows in the guitar since that could be causing the problem as well


Well I tried low passing stuff(or something)

Maybe I'm doing it wrong

EDIT:
OH!!! High pass oops
#11
Quote by xFilth
Yeah, always hi-pass filter your guitars (when mixing with bass). I do it around 120hz


Thanks I'll do that.
#13
Quote by xFilth
You double/quad-tracking guitars?


just double track it. My PC is kinda weak and can't support too many tracks before it hangs.

I double track everything including bass and drums. Uh is that ok?

I just kinda go with what I think is loud enough.
#14
You shouldn't double track bass or drums to be honest. Double track guitars and pan the tracks sharp left and right (85-100%). If you are lacking volume/consistency, you might want to look at compression on your tracks
#15
I kinda try to compress my tracks. I kinda do it individually but not at the master. I don't know much about it but I use my ear to hear if it is loud enough and don't really know what I'm doing
#16
If you're doing any sort of heavy or rock music, you need to compress the shit out of your bass DI then if you're using any sort of distortion or amp coloring, compress that too; I usually end up using a limiter in my bass chain. This will even out the dynamics and making mixing your bass track much easier.

From there, depending on the tuning, the bass, and the way you play, you'll probably need to use either multiband compression to tame the 150-300hz region, or just scoop it out with EQ (this is where a lot of the big bassy resonances come from that make the track overpowering). I usually end up high passing my bass track with a 6db/octave slope at about 100hz and then make a cut where ever the low end energy of the kick is (usually 62hz on my metal mixes). It's generally better to make cuts instead of boost, and always make your EQ cuts before compression that way your compressor isn't bringing up frequencies you don't want in the first place.
#17
Quote by xFilth
You shouldn't double track bass or drums to be honest. Double track guitars and pan the tracks sharp left and right (85-100%). If you are lacking volume/consistency, you might want to look at compression on your tracks

This isn't totally correct. As a some people do put samples over drums hits so in a way it is "double tracking", besides when ever you track drums it is usually already double tracked because of the bleed on overheads.
#18
Quote by FireHawk
This isn't totally correct. As a some people do put samples over drums hits so in a way it is "double tracking", besides when ever you track drums it is usually already double tracked because of the bleed on overheads.


That doesn't really count as doubling, imo. Then parallel compression would be doubling as well :P
#19
Mixing is an art as well as a science. The goal is to let each instrument get across with enough definition and color. Each instrument has overlapping frequencies, which need to be shared intelligently. HPF for the guitars is usually a good idea around 100Hz or so. You may want to do some shelfing with the bass and bass drum to have them work well together.
#20
If the bass is thick and clean and on the kick count, I occasionally add slight compression w/ sidechain coming from the kick. This allows the kick to be more heavily emphasized. Of course, this technique is used more with electronic music but there are occasions when it can apply to rock and such.