#1
Okay after learning chords and scales what to do next?

I've been playing guitar for 1 year and i dont know what to do next. i look at my songs and they're all mostly using power chords. i dont want that, and some of my songs are EXTREMELY HARD because they're fast and complex.

I'm on the verge of putting my guitar down because i don't know what songs to play because i don't know what to learn next in order to play the songs that i like. and it really frustrates me.

So guys what do you all learn after learning chords and pentatonic scales? where do you all go next?

If you guys wanna know my musical tastes. They are

Rock
Alternative
Metal
Classic Rock (Most Preferred Out Of The List)
Punk
Grunge
Indie (Not Much)
#2
If you can give use any indication on the actual songs you know, and can play flawlessly 9/10 times, as well as the songs you wish to be able to learn, we may be able to help. Until then we can only suggest songs which may be out of your league or too easy.]

In terms of theory, I would look at the major scale and arpegios next.
#3
Well it seems to me like you need to expand your music taste or challenge yourself!

Why not try learning fingerpicking? I can assure you that will occupy you for many many months, and who knows, you might really enjoy it.

A good beginner fingerpicking song is Nothing Else Matters by Metallica, not to mention it has a really nice beginner to intermediate guitar solo.
#4
Hmm, Technical Difficulties if you want a real challenge

Holy Wars if you need some intense riff practice

Sweet Child O' Mine if your looking for a moderate challenge

Back In Black if you wanna play it simple

It's your choice.
#5
Quote by Naruto00121
Hmm, Technical Difficulties if you want a real challenge.


Technical difficulties seems way too extreme after only playing for a year. I can't imagine anyone who would give that song a go after just a year, and for most people playing that short a time i think it would possibly make them even more frustrated and not motivated.
#6
You sound a lot like me back some time. I would definitely check this series of articles: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/the_ultimate_guide_to_guitar_chapter_i__1_introduction_-_the_guitar.html

Learn major scales and harmonizing them along with the other stuff. Don't worry if it easily goes over your head. I had to read those guides many times before I got a good understanding of basic music theory. That stuff is really useful even if you might not think it is.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#7
Do some Led Zeppelin songs! So many simple, intermediate and complex guitar parts to choose from. I can't estimate what you think is insanely complex but try these songs completely, most of them have simple riffs and intermediate solos:

Whole Lotta Love
The Ocean
Ten Years Gone
Tangerine
The Rover

Also, maybe you could try some alternative tunings?
Wonderful One (Gb Gb Db Gb Db Gb) (not LZ, but from the album 'No Quarter - Page & Plant Unledded)
Rain Song (EADADE or DGCGCD)
Kashmir (DADGAD)
Maybe some open tuning songs from the Rolling Stones.
#8
okay i'm mostly good at those songs that use lots of power chords (Green Day, Rise Against) but i got sick of it and i wanna try something different.

The hardest song I've played was (Don't kill me!)

Avenged Sevenfold - Unholy Confessions

Rockwell92, at first i wanna learn Zeppelin's Whole lotta love but the solo is TOO FAST AND COMPLEX!!!

I think my main issue is the song's solo is too fast and complex
#9
If it's too fast an complex maybe you're not ready for it just yet? You could try to challenge yourself, but if it's way too big a challenge then i think you'd get frustrated and you'd probably get pissed.
I think you should expand your musical tastes.
#10
Surely you don't know everything about chords and using scales after 1 year.
Heres a suggestion:

Make sure you know the Major Scale

Make sure you can play actual 'basic' chords ie. Major, Minor, 7th, not just 5th Chords (powerchords)

Intervals (This will help you in Chord Theory) & Chord Theory/Building. (This will show you how chords fit together)

After that (or at the same time, w/e) try USING scales, it's well and nice if you know the scale shapes but they are kind of useless if you can't use them, in a practcal sense.

If you want some bands/songs to challenge you:
Iron Maiden - Children Of The Damned or Wrathchild
Led Zeppelin - Whole Lotta Love
Rage Against The Machine - Bombtrack
#11
Quote by PUNKSTER93
okay i'm mostly good at those songs that use lots of power chords (Green Day, Rise Against) but i got sick of it and i wanna try something different.

The hardest song I've played was (Don't kill me!)

Avenged Sevenfold - Unholy Confessions

Rockwell92, at first i wanna learn Zeppelin's Whole lotta love but the solo is TOO FAST AND COMPLEX!!!

I think my main issue is the song's solo is too fast and complex


Sorry for the double post but i saw this just after i posted my other comment.

If 5th chords (powerchords) are boring you, practice other types of chords Major, Minor, 7ths.
You don't NEED to learn a song with them straight away, just practice them untill you've got them.

If the solo to Whole Lotta Love is too hard then don't play it yet, simple.
Just play the rhythm and leave the solo(s).
#12
You like avenged sevenfold - learn bat country (without the solo) and seize the day (without or with the solo) - bat country letting you play around with drop d tuning, seize the day having some variations on chords you already know.
Learn something with finger picking in it - it's a useful technique.. nothing else matters as mentioned previously or romance (anonymous artist but well known piece)

Its been said above but learn various varations of the chords you've learnt, and work out how they fit together - brilliant for making your own songs, which is one way to improve your ability. Scales... fairly obvious really, keep practising them and learn new ones!

Finally, I learn't metallica's one after about a year of playing, mixture between picked parts and powerchords, with manageable solos (the last one may present you some problems, I don't know the extent of your skill).

Hope this helps
I'm L.

emo_goth is a username from a long time ago - don't judge me for it!
#13
For working on speed with solos, I would recommend downloading Tuxguitar (it's a free version of Guitar Pro, just google it). With this you can loop a section you have problems with at a low percentage of the speed and every time you play it, it will speed up, by the percentage increase you choose. This is great because you can begin as slow as 1% if you wished. I find this better than a metronome for solo's as it can be a bit of a pain doing the counting and remembering what you have to play for some solos with tricky timing.

You can also use the program to play along with through the whole song, theyre generally just as good as a backing track. I would highly recommend this for beginners, as you can hear behind the vocals much easier than playing along with songs

Just keep working away at it at slower speeds until your really comfortable with it, and before you know it, you'll be playing at full speed
Last edited by l3vity at Jun 20, 2011,
#14
okay guys i just wanna know is it REALLY necessary to know the "next note of the scale thingy"?

How will that help my finger dexterity?
Last edited by PUNKSTER93 at Jun 20, 2011,
#15
oh yeah and i think that my pull offs are not good.

Because i think that i "flick" them too hard making my fingers sloppy
#16
Quote by PUNKSTER93
is it REALLY necessary to know the "next note of the scale thingy"?


wtf?? What do you mean by a scale thingy?
If you mean the notes of the major scale (or any other scale) then yes, if you want to learn theory it is the very least you can do.

Edit://
As for your pull off problem, there is nothing much to do than practice.
Either learn some simple solos with some easy/slow pull offs or just practice pull offs slowly and gradually get faster.
Last edited by SumFX at Jun 20, 2011,
#17
Quote by SumFX
wtf?? What do you mean by a scale thingy?
If you mean the notes of the major scale (or any other scale) then yes, if you want to learn theory it is the very least you can do.
yes i think that's what you meant because all i know is this scale

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/pentatonic_scales.html

i can go through every single one of them in 168 BPM all in one shot.

that link is the ONLY thing that taught me scales
#18
Quote by PUNKSTER93
yes i think that's what you meant because all i know is this scale

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/pentatonic_scales.html

i can go through every single one of them in 168 BPM all in one shot.

that link is the ONLY thing that taught me scales


So you just know the Pentatonic Scale?

Good start.

Now, focus on one (reasonable) thing you want to do, as jugling subjects can be confusing.

What you basically asked was, do you need to know the notes you are playing?

Short answer is yes BUT if you just want to play other peoples solos, then not really at this moment.
#19
Quote by PUNKSTER93
yes i think that's what you meant because all i know is this scale

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/pentatonic_scales.html

i can go through every single one of them in 168 BPM all in one shot.

that link is the ONLY thing that taught me scales

Exactly, and when you sit down and think about it, is that really helping you play the guitar any better?

Being able to play through a scale pattern is useless, it's not teaching you anything - scales aren't there for you to chase the metronome. Running up and down scales is boring for a guitarist, but it's mind-numbing for a listener. Nobody wants to listen tosomeone run up and down a scale, they wat to hear you create something with those notes. What matters is knowing the sounds contained within that scale and knowing the names of those sounds ie the note names so you can relate that scale to other scales, chords or a piece of music.
Understanding scales helps you understand music, and that in turn makes learning other peoples material and creating your own a lot easier.
Actually called Mark!

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#20
Quote by SumFX
So you just know the Pentatonic Scale?

Good start.

Now, focus on one (reasonable) thing you want to do, as jugling subjects can be confusing.

What you basically asked was, do you need to know the notes you are playing?

Short answer is yes BUT if you just want to play other peoples solos, then not really at this moment.

i wanna play other people's solos that's all. i just wanna know what techniques i should do next? or maybe some scales i should do next.
#22
Quote by steven seagull
Exactly, and when you sit down and think about it, is that really helping you play the guitar any better?

Being able to play through a scale pattern is useless, it's not teaching you anything - scales aren't there for you to chase the metronome. Running up and down scales is boring for a guitarist, but it's mind-numbing for a listener. Nobody wants to listen tosomeone run up and down a scale, they wat to hear you create something with those notes. What matters is knowing the sounds contained within that scale and knowing the names of those sounds ie the note names so you can relate that scale to other scales, chords or a piece of music.
Understanding scales helps you understand music, and that in turn makes learning other peoples material and creating your own a lot easier.

okay i get what you mean. and of course nobody wants to listen people running up and down the scale, i did the quickness because of building up my finger dexterity

So does this mean that if for example

a C major scale have an E note in it can i continue that E note with the E major scale?

And does making my own scale improve my guitar playing by a longshot?
#23
Quote by vayne92
Stop posting and start playing the guitar :P
LOL i am playing it while posting ^_^
#24
Quote by PUNKSTER93
i wanna play other people's solos that's all. i just wanna know what techniques i should do next? or maybe some scales i should do next.


To put it short and sweet, most 'Rock' bands use pentatonics (with exceptions, obviousy).

If all you want to do is play other peoples solos, and your content and happy with that, you don't need to bother with scales.

Maybe in a few years time you will want to write your own music, when that time comes you will need to learn some theory (Thats when scales will be important).

Baisc techniques are Hammer Ons, Pull Offs, Vibrato, Sliding, Bends.

Youtube them, it's easier to see people do it than have someone explain them to you over the internet.
#25
Quote by PUNKSTER93
And does making my own scale improve my guitar playing by a longshot?


It's the little steps you take over a long period of time that improve your guitar playing "by a longshot".

It's like saying does learning an A minor chord improve your playing by a longshot.
No it doesn't. Learn a huge arsenal of chords over a series of years and it will improve your playing by a longshot.

Same with learning the riff to unholy confessions for example. It wont improve your playing by a long shot, but learn dozens of songs over a period of years and it will.

You can learn a scale in 10 minutes. You can learn a riff in 10 minutes. You can learn a whole song in even 10 minutes.

You get out what you put in, and you're going to have to put in a lot of time over many years to improve by a longshot.
After all, guitar is a lifelong journey (:
#26
Thanks SumFX and vayne92 and all of you giving me advices and stuff. and i agree with you vayne92 like what you said its the little steps you take over a long period of time that improves your guitar playing.

Once again thanks alot guys!
#27
Keep in mind, just because you might one day be able to play some crazy solo you never thought possible it doesn't mean you've suddenly drastically improved. It means that you've been improving over time, and you haven't even realised it yet. You'll notice this a lot as a beginner.
#28
Quote by PUNKSTER93
Thanks SumFX and vayne92 and all of you giving me advices and stuff. and i agree with you vayne92 like what you said its the little steps you take over a long period of time that improves your guitar playing.

Once again thanks alot guys!


Good luck and make sure that your "eyes are not bigger than your belly" when it comes to learning guitar, if you get what i mean.
#29
Quote by vayne92
Keep in mind, just because you might one day be able to play some crazy solo you never thought possible it doesn't mean you've suddenly drastically improved. It means that you've been improving over time, and you haven't even realised it yet. You'll notice this a lot as a beginner.
OK i'll keep that in mind
#30
Quote by SumFX
Good luck and make sure that your "eyes are not bigger than your belly" when it comes to learning guitar, if you get what i mean.

very sorry but i dont get what that means
#31
Quote by PUNKSTER93
very sorry but i dont get what that means


No problem, thinking about it, it was a prety weird analogy for learning guitar.

My point was, you shouldn't take on too much at a time because you may get discouraged or end up half assing your practice time.
Last edited by SumFX at Jun 20, 2011,