#1
Hey,

Injury has rendered my left hand(fretting) out of action for a few weeks/months and I'm trying to come up with the best practice idea's I can without being able to play guitar.

I've got my right hand for playing some basic piano stuffs and thought about transposing with the piano perhaps?

Guess my question is if you couldn't play guitar, what would you practice?
#2
practice right hand tapping?

work on reading music,transcribing,singing also read up on some thoery,write some stuff withouth the guitar

this is only the music related stuff theres also videogames(wii is the easier one handed console) reading books
watching movies,tv
theres abunch of stuff you can do
#3
I'd get on my laptop and write some music in guitar pro

might aswell learn some theory or some mixing techniques.
knowledge is always helpful
#4
Study some theory, ear training, perhaps analyse some songs you like and see what makes them work etc.
#5
Quote by chrispantling
Hey,

Injury has rendered my left hand(fretting) out of action for a few weeks/months and I'm trying to come up with the best practice idea's I can without being able to play guitar.

I've got my right hand for playing some basic piano stuffs and thought about transposing with the piano perhaps?

Guess my question is if you couldn't play guitar, what would you practice?



When I broke my left wrist I learned a little tapping, read up on some theory, bought a harmonica, kazoo, tamborine, ect... even took a small break for a few weeks, which was great. I hate studying and I found a month of theory was burning me out pretty quick.

Its really up to you on how you want to spend your time. If there is a specific right hand technique you wanted to learn and or master, nows a great time. If there are holes in your theory, now is a great time to fill them in. If your feeling burnt out and not so creative, now is a great time to take a little break. There isnt really a right or wrong answer on how to spend your time.
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
#6
Visualization.

See yourself doing it, slowly, perfectly.

Repeat.

This is how I was trained to learn new techniques in martial arts, and I've found it works in pretty much any discipline that requires precision motor skills.

It's sort of like getting better just by thinking about it...
#7
Quote by Arby911
Visualization.

See yourself doing it, slowly, perfectly.

Repeat.

This is how I was trained to learn new techniques in martial arts, and I've found it works in pretty much any discipline that requires precision motor skills.

It's sort of like getting better just by thinking about it...


+1 this really does work...

If you know you can do it, and belive whole heartedly that you can... the only thing left to do is, to go out and actually do it.

Mind over matter
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
#8
Quote by Arby911
Visualization.

See yourself doing it, slowly, perfectly.

Repeat.

This is how I was trained to learn new techniques in martial arts, and I've found it works in pretty much any discipline that requires precision motor skills.

It's sort of like getting better just by thinking about it...


I can also vouch for this. Sometimes when I was learning a song and would get frustrated, I would go over the song in my head, or whatever part I was having trouble with until I could visualize where to put my fingers everytime I thought of it. When I came back it was much easier to learn, I had basically gotten the riff but in my head.