#1
If C# to G is an Augmented 4th, why is a G to an C# and Diminished 5th?
Why the name change?
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#2
Quote by unicornfist
why is a G to an C# and Diminished 5th?


It's not. G to C# is an augmented 4th. G to Db is an diminished 5th. You have to look at the letters to determine the number of the interval. Fortunately, with augmented 4th/diminished 5th, you can just say "tritone" if you don't want to figure it out.
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#3
Quote by soviet_ska
It's not. G to C# is an augmented 4th. G to Db is an diminished 5th. You have to look at the letters to determine the number of the interval. Fortunately, with augmented 4th/diminished 5th, you can just say "tritone" if you don't want to figure it out.


Oh! I just looked back and didn't even notice it was different. Haha, thanks for clearing it up for me.
Current Gear:
Mexican Fender Telecaster
Robert Smith custom Jazzmaster
Stratocaster
Vox AC4TV
#4
It's based on the one note's relation to the other.

If you have a major scale, G A B C D E F#, there can only be one note that acts as a fourth, and that's C. Cb is a diminished fourth (not commonly seen), and C# is an augmented fourth. Likewise, the only note that functions as a fifth is the D. It's got more to do with the spelling of chords.. if you were asked to spell out a G diminished triad, you would spell it G Bb Db, because to make a major triad into a diminished one, aside from changing the third, you alter the fifth. Spelling the chord G Bb C# is enharmonically correct, but to read that, you would assume something has been done to the fourth, not the fifth. It's for the same reason you wouldn't spell a G minor triad G A# D. A is the second, not the third; a minor triad has a lowered third degree, not a raised second.
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Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#5
Quote by Instrumetal
It's based on the one note's relation to the other.

If you have a major scale, G A B C D E F#, there can only be one note that acts as a fourth, and that's C. Cb is a diminished fourth (not commonly seen), and C# is an augmented fourth. Likewise, the only note that functions as a fifth is the D. It's got more to do with the spelling of chords.. if you were asked to spell out a G diminished triad, you would spell it G Bb Db, because to make a major triad into a diminished one, aside from changing the third, you alter the fifth. Spelling the chord G Bb C# is enharmonically correct, but to read that, you would assume something has been done to the fourth, not the fifth. It's for the same reason you wouldn't spell a G minor triad G A# D. A is the second, not the third; a minor triad has a lowered third degree, not a raised second.


That helped alot. Thanks .
Current Gear:
Mexican Fender Telecaster
Robert Smith custom Jazzmaster
Stratocaster
Vox AC4TV