#1
Hi.

I've been playing guitar for 2 years , but i havent learned any theory and now i want to start with that too. So i wanted to ask : from what part should i start and can some1 give me some course so i can follow it through learning cuz i dont want to lose myself.
#3
Not funny. It's good too start with understanding how chords are built. Understanding the intervals of your major and minor scales. Knowing how to harmonise a major scale. If you know that you can work from there...further and further. There is no guide for how to start really but I think this would be the best.
#6
well on google is everything little bit messy..thanks Scream for tips that seems very logical to follow and i already started to learn notes
#7
Check out the musictheory.net link in my sig. Go through it slowly, making sure you understand it. Better yet, apply what you are learning to further internalize it.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#8
Quote by lapy
Hi.

I've been playing guitar for 2 years , but i havent learned any theory and now i want to start with that too. So i wanted to ask : from what part should i start and can some1 give me some course so i can follow it through learning cuz i dont want to lose myself.


Hi lapy, and welcome.

I'd probably want to know what you know after 2 years of playing, to make sure you aren't starting it too soon. Theory applied to the guitar is great, I teach it and I love it, but there's something to be said for making sure that you have all your basic guitar knowledge solid first. 2 years isn't a long time in guitar years, in terms of learning and development.

Music theory.net is a great start. Have you ever considered private lessons as well? How have you learned what you know to this point?

Best,

Sean
#9
I would start by listening to different contemporaries of music, to get a feel for how they structure everything.

Learn Chord structure first, like which chords like to "Go" with others. Once you learn this, learn the major and minor scales for each chord. then build on from there.
#10
If you didn't mind spending a little money you might want to try Sebelius Musition. Has courses at all levels that you can do and be tested by the software. Not guitar focused, but great for getting to grips with general theory.
#11
Quote by Sean0913
Hi lapy, and welcome.

I'd probably want to know what you know after 2 years of playing, to make sure you aren't starting it too soon. Theory applied to the guitar is great, I teach it and I love it, but there's something to be said for making sure that you have all your basic guitar knowledge solid first. 2 years isn't a long time in guitar years, in terms of learning and development.

Music theory.net is a great start. Have you ever considered private lessons as well? How have you learned what you know to this point?

Best,

Sean


Well in terms of technical development i'm learning how to sweep picking , but i also want to transcribe songs and improvise. I know notes on fretboard but i need to stop a little bit to remember whats note on what fret so I'm practicing that too. I thought a little bit about lessons too, but since i have much free time cuz school's over i wanted to start on my own.
#12
Quote by lapy
Hi.

I've been playing guitar for 2 years , but i havent learned any theory and now i want to start with that too. So i wanted to ask : from what part should i start and can some1 give me some course so i can follow it through learning cuz i dont want to lose myself.


First learn pentatonic scales all over the neck in all positions in A minor. Then learn the Natural minor scale in A minor( That is just two more notes added to the pentatonics you already know). Then you can start to learn chord scales and intervals and get a feel for why chords sound the way they do. After you get all that stuff down you will have a good foundation. It is up to your ears for the rest. But of course...you could learn more if you want , it really depends what your goals are.

I highly suggest you get Doug Mark's Metal Method Guitar Course on Theory. It is not just another stupid dvd or something you won't understand like a lot of other crap out there on the internet. If I could understand it anyone can!!! It is what gave me a start to the basic theory I know!! Get the old version of theory and the new one!!
Last edited by Appetite_4_GNR at Jun 22, 2011,
#13
Quote by lapy
Well in terms of technical development i'm learning how to sweep picking , but i also want to transcribe songs and improvise. I know notes on fretboard but i need to stop a little bit to remember whats note on what fret so I'm practicing that too. I thought a little bit about lessons too, but since i have much free time cuz school's over i wanted to start on my own.



Technical development is great, but can you play and change your basic chords, like do you know the names of all your open position chords? When I teach, I call them the "Big 10"

A, Am, B11, C, D, Dm, E, Em, F and G

What songs can you play? How many songs do you know all the way through. Technique to me, isn't knowing the guitar or playing the guitar, it's a micro performance area that allows you to emulate a small part of what guitar is about, while still knowing largely nothing about it. It's seductive because it can create the illusion that someone can "play", but then I find that their foundation crumbles when they are asked to play a I vi IV V in C. Turns out they learned how to parrot their heroes and that's where it ends.

So all their effort has been to sound like someone else, and they have nothing to add musically from what's inside them.

You can spend a lot of years on technique and still barely get anywhere. Technique is a tool. Knowledge can add to the usefulness of that tool.

You mentioned above, however that you need a few seconds to figure out a note's name. That's about what I find for those who claim to know the neck. In applying theory though, it is a good idea to be able to know the neck better so that you can do things in real time. For example If I needed to highlight chord tones of a C#m but I decided to use the 9th as a tension tone to open my solo and resolve it to the root, it helps to know what a 9th is, and then to be able find it in real time, wherever I am.

I'm not fully sure that you have your basics down. (nothing against you, its just I'd need to ask you more questions to make a successful evaluation, and then based upon that, an appropriate recommendation) I don't know if this forum is the best way to determine this. If you'd like, and if you have Yahoo or some way to IM, I could better go through what you know in real time (as long as I'm not teaching class at the Academy at that moment).

Just let me know. You can contact me through my profile and I'll do what I can to help.

I cannot recommend Doug Marks - I know of his material, I first watched it in the late 80's, and his DVD's are a rehash of them. Also, I do not agree with the recommendation of learning your pentatonics all over the neck. As far as I know, then person who is saying that isn't a teacher, and has taught no one. There are better ways to put your knowledge together, and I'm all about not wasting time getting to your goals.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 22, 2011,
#14
yeah,sure i know them by names and i can change between them easily. I mainly play A/X cuz they're my fav band (Bat Country, Beast And Harlot,...) and Rise Against so its just about Hard Rock.. I'll contact you ..