#1
So I been wanting to learn some Country style guitar. but instead of learning the licks and songs and being clueless at the end, I want to learn the Theory behind why the licks are, why they are how they are. I understand Country guitar uses alot of open strings but I want to know why the notes are what they are.

If anyone can direct me to a source that would be amazing (:

But thank you
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#2
I really like the Lick Library country dvd's. Very good with techniques. Licklibrary.com

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#3
I've been working on country lead guitar a lot lately as well. One thing you can do is try and figure out how to play some of your favorite major and minor pentatonic licks (a knowledge of how to play the pentatonic scale all over the neck is essential) using as many open strings as possible, learn how to double notes with different strings and play banjo roll-style licks, hammer-ons and pull-offs, double and triple stops (knowing your triads is very helpful here), bending strings and multiple-string bends, 'chicken-pickin', where muted notes are added to licks to get a clucky, percussive sound. That's the kind of stuff most country lead primers will tell you about, though I'm probably missing something.

I've found that country guitarists often play fills that involve double stops of a third, but especially sixths. Learning how to play up and down scales in sixths, both broken and harmonized, can add some color to otherwise boring fills and licks as well. And MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL: Listen to lots of country music. You can't speak a language if you haven't heard anyone else speak it.
Get baked, study theory.

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Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#4
Quote by Xter
So I been wanting to learn some Country style guitar. but instead of learning the licks and songs and being clueless at the end, I want to learn the Theory behind why the licks are, why they are how they are. I understand Country guitar uses alot of open strings but I want to know why the notes are what they are.

If anyone can direct me to a source that would be amazing (:

But thank you

they play that way because thats the style. i dont think you are going to find much else on that. its just an efficient way of playing to use open strings. also its easy to get fast, rolling licks with the open strings.
#5
Learn country songs. That's all I can tell you. There's not a lot out there beyond that. Have a good ear, and a lot of time. I joined a touring Texas red-dirt, country artist as a hired gun, about 2 and a half months ago. I'd never played it in my life. Ive been spending the last few months teaching myself to play, feel and hear country, expecially in leads.

Also, improvising uses some very advanced techniques, and blazing skills that would make shredders cry.

Try studying the following:

Brent Mason
Brad Paisley
Danny Gatton
Johnny Hilland
James Burton
Scotty Anderson
Steve Trovato

Be prepared to want to break your guitar when you realize some songs used Nashville tuning, a baritone, partial capo with other strings detuned, or a B/G Bender. It's very hard. I've always known how much a challenge it was, and I was dead on correct. I could play all day long in keys, but making those sound country is/has been a humbling journey. I'm better now, after 2.5 months at it, than I was then, but I expect to take at least a year before I consider myself a country player.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 22, 2011,