#1
So i was playing around with the double harmonic scale earlier:
1 b2 3 4 5 b6 7
and i decided to figure out some chord progressions that would work. But when i got to the 5th and 7th degrees, i came across these triads:

1 3 b5
1 2 b5

Anyone have any idea what these chords are? and should i use them in progressions or should i see if i can make them 7th chords and invert them to make some sense out of them?
#2
Well the 1 3 b5 is a major -5 chord as far as I know, I don't think there's such a thing as a sus2 -5 though. Truth be told I've never tried harmonizing the double harmonic, and I don't have any instrument at hand to try this out but go for the 7ths, see how that turns out, you'll most likely end up with a 9/maj9 no fifth chord or such on the 1 2 b5.
Last edited by Ascendant at Jun 22, 2011,
#3
From a theoretical point of view you could harmonize the double harmonic minor, but from a practical view i think the chords lack a harmonic coherence you can build a stable progression from. The VII would be something like b5 add9 no third, which would hardly function at all.
Think double harmonic should be used over harmonic/natural minor progression using the b2 and 7 as accidentals to add some exotic color.
#4
One of the bi-products of harmonising these scales is that your song will inevitably result in a progression that is in a major or minor key (or mode) anyways. It really does call into question the pracicality or usefulness of harmonising the scale.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by AlanHB
It really does call into question the pracicality or usefulness of harmonising the scale.


Yeah...I guess it's good for some new ideas, but if you want to use a chord for the 5th or 7th interval, just go with V and vii*.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#6
Quote by DearMoose
From a theoretical point of view you could harmonize the double harmonic minor, but from a practical view i think the chords lack a harmonic coherence you can build a stable progression from. The VII would be something like b5 add9 no third, which would hardly function at all.
Think double harmonic should be used over harmonic/natural minor progression using the b2 and 7 as accidentals to add some exotic color.


Moose nailed it! +1

Sean
#7
So the whole purpose of this scale seems to be adding tendency tones to lead towards the tonic and dominant. The b6 pulls towards the 5, and that b2 pulls back towards the tonic, in addition to your typical 4-> 3 and 7 -> 1 movements. If you want to capture the flavor of this scale, make use of the tension and release that comes from those intervals. Major scale harmony already covers the 4 -> 3 and 7 -> 1 ideas pretty well, so look to exploit the b2 -> 1 and b6 -> 5.

Alan was correct in saying that your progression is going to imply a certain key/tonality. If you want to inherit some of the unique feel of the scale, try taking a couple of this scale's signature chords and work it back into a diatonic progression. I would personally use the bII and the bVI and base the rest around major scale harmony. You can use the bVI to fall back onto V for starters. The bII can similarly pull to I for a sort of Phrygian-feeling cadence.

N.B. that both the bVI and bII are already commonly borrowed chords. You wouldn't really be breaking the mold by using these chords within major scale harmony, but this is one way this sort of stuff gets discovered. I guess the real lesson here is to supplement your playing with new scalar ideas, but there's a good reason why we eventually stuck with the major scale and the three variations of the minor.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.