#1
Hopefully you guys can help with this.

With left hand finger technique. It's about the tips of your fingers.
Obviously I've heard things such as you should play on the tips of your fingers, with them curled up.
But I've seen people playing flatter. And my old guitar tutor told me to play with my fingers flat.

So that if your playing the b string fret 5 with your index finger. The top of your finger would touch the g string and the under side of the index finger would touch the e string the mute them. (And so on for all other fingers.)

Or, you play on the very tip of the finger only touching the b string.

Which one of these is correct?
#2
Both are techniques are pretty essential

Like you said, positioning your finger really flat will help you mute adjacent strings, but you can't play a fast scale that way, can you?

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Last edited by shwilly at Jun 22, 2011,
#3
Quote by shwilly
Both are techniques are pretty essential

Like you said, positioning your finger really flat will help you mute adjacent strings, but you can't play a fast scale that way, can you?

sure you can! with some practice that is...

TS, how abou middle point? Flat enough to mute one adjacent string?

actually, i red somewhere that sweeping is adviced with flat fingering for better muting.. but whatever floats your boat
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#4
Quote by hr113
sure you can! with some practice that is...

TS, how abou middle point? Flat enough to mute one adjacent string?

actually, i red somewhere that sweeping is adviced with flat fingering for better muting.. but whatever floats your boat
LOL, try doing a fast run like that on the A and low E: not saying it can't be done but you'd pbbly be destroying your wrist or muting notes that aren't supposed to be muted

Anyway: the way you hold your fingers really doesn't alter the "point of contact" on your fingers -> whether you hold 'em real flat (like when playing the blues scale and doing some crazy bends on the G string) or arched in order to play some weird stretchy stuff on the lower strings E you're still touching the string with the same part of your fingers (wich is the tip). THAT's why you accommodate your fingers in all sorts of unusual ways: to exercise extra strength while bending, to play licks that require some stretching, etc. (a lot of that action comes from your wrist too), not because you want to hit the string with another part of your finger, because you don't

The only exception to this rule are, of course, barre chords

Try and see for yourself: depending on your technique the string will (probably) touch your finger slightly lower when you hold it real flat, but it's still your fingertip. You could even try arching your finger and pressing a string down real hard, then compare the mark that leaves on your finger compared to the one you get after doing some serious bending (if you hold your fingers at an angle the mark will of course be at an angle too, most likely near the edge of your fingertip, but it's still...)

/] 三方 [\
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Last edited by shwilly at Jun 22, 2011,
#5
Both.

Use tips of fingers when strings adjacent need to ring out. Flatten when strings adjacent need to be muted. (not to flat lol, enough to mute).
#6
The more and more I learn about guitar. The more I realise that most techniques are completely useless in some situations, and then very useful in others...
Guitar is a very hypocritical instrument....

'Hold your fingers flat!' ...
*Student starts playing a different song.*
'Hold your fingers straight!'
*Student gets confused...*
#7
that is true at times one thing may seem useless but in the end you will do what is right without realizing it after practicing long enough
#8
Quote by shwilly
LOL, try doing a fast run like that on the A and low E: not saying it can't be done but you'd pbbly be destroying your wrist or muting notes that aren't supposed to be muted

Anyway: the way you hold your fingers really doesn't alter the "point of contact" on your fingers -> whether you hold 'em real flat (like when playing the blues scale and doing some crazy bends on the G string) or arched in order to play some weird stretchy stuff on the lower strings E you're still touching the string with the same part of your fingers (wich is the tip). THAT's why you accommodate your fingers in all sorts of unusual ways: to exercise extra strength while bending, to play licks that require some stretching, etc. (a lot of that action comes from your wrist too), not because you want to hit the string with another part of your finger, because you don't

The only exception to this rule are, of course, barre chords

Try and see for yourself: depending on your technique the string will (probably) touch your finger slightly lower when you hold it real flat, but it's still your fingertip. You could even try arching your finger and pressing a string down real hard, then compare the mark that leaves on your finger compared to the one you get after doing some serious bending (if you hold your fingers at an angle the mark will of course be at an angle too, most likely near the edge of your fingertip, but it's still...)


Whoa ,man, i think youre going too extreme with flat-fingering

i dont mean barre-flat, just when sweeping, i head, its advised to play not with your fingertips, but with soft-cushiony-part of your finger. Strings on my guitar are quite close to each other (thats why some other guitars feel awkward sometimes) so when im sweeping (cushiony part presses down on the string) tip of my finger touches the lower string muting it and the rest of the finger mutes higher strings.

Works fairly well
Quote by the_white_bunny
the point of life is to die.
and pay taxes.


Quote by /PurpleWhalez/
Blasphemy as severe as this is fucking unforgivable and by bullshito code you must commit sudoku for disgracing famirys honoru.