#1
Your guitar for some reason becomes unplayable for the gig, and you left your backup at home. theres 2 guitars, you can borrow 1 for the gig.

option A is a guitar that is perfectly suited for your style of music (appropriate shape,tonewoods, electronics, hardware, etc.) but it doesnt feel that great. its a good quality guitar, but it just doesnt sit right in your hands

option B is a guitar that feels really good in your hands but is not at all suited for your style of music (like a hollow body for a thash metal band) and the rest of the guitar isnt suitable either (pickups/elexctronics/hardware)

your band goes on in 5 minutes. which guitar do you choose?
#3
Option B, its better to play well, and not have the perfect tone than to play bad but have a nice tone.
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#4
B easily. It's possible to make anything work for any genre, assuming you still have an amp and pedalboard geared for the genre you'd be playing.
#5
Option A in most cases. It's only one gig, and I can deal with a guitar that doesn't feel just right for an hour if it means the band doesn't sound terrible.
#7
B. xD I'm one of those people that's REALLY REALLY REALLY picky with guitar feel(as in, like, I can't play anything with a thin neck, and I find anything that isn't a V uncomfortable sitting down), so I'd rather a Reverend Volcano or something(the guitar that got me GASing over Vs left and right, but it sounds...oh god...xD) over an RG, say. XD
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Nah, I prefer to tune lower. My tunings usually go into weird Hebrew symbols.
#8
don't go to a gig without a backup or two.

but to answer the question, A. play the bad feeling guitar and think to yourself "bring a backup next time" the whole night
#9
ooh this is a tough one. Option B could have you sounding bad, but option A's uncomfortableness could just as easily make you sound bad if you're not playing your best or getting distracted by how bad it feels...


I think I'd go with B
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#10
if it was like a gretsch for a thrash metal band, i would certainly take the solid body that doesnt feel as good and make it work for me.

but that is an extreme example. i think the apropriate answer is to weight your options with your genre and choose accordingly. obviously, we would all choose the best feeling guitar but like i said, if the best feling guitar is a full hollowbody for death metal, its obviously not going to work.
#11
Quote by ikey_
i think the apropriate answer is to weight your options with your genre and choose accordingly. obviously, we would all choose the best feeling guitar but like i said, if the best feling guitar is a full hollowbody for death metal, its obviously not going to work.


+1

This is the right way to address this problem.

There are so many possible permutations to the problem that it's gonna be hard to give a direct answer.

For example:
1. Its hard to use a semi-hollow for high gain, no matter how good it feels (assuming you can overcome the additional guitar body width)
2. If you absolutely need the 22 - 24th frets on your 1st and 2nd string, or need a flyod rose, you can't just pick a strat and go with it.
3. Need single coils for tone? Then humbuckers won't cut it.

Its not a simple question of whether you go with one or the other. You really need to weigh the problems and go with the guitar that will give you less problems, but still meets your needs.
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Last edited by ragingkitty at Jun 22, 2011,
#12
Option B.

I've been able to get a fairly heavy (and good) sound out of a semi-hollow body, so if that's the one that feels better then damn, that's what I'm using.
#13
A all the way. Or go with the good old air guitar, you'd be better that way than option B.
#15
Quote by SSampuser68
A all the way. Or go with the good old air guitar, you'd be better that way than option B.

yup, option b is not that great.
#16
Option A, it's not like I'm crippled on the guitar as soon as I touch one that I don't like the feel of, it usually takes to me about 5 minutes to get used to other people's guitars.
#17
people who are super picky about feel bug me. I mean a good feeling guitar is great, but if you can't play a strat because its too different in feel from your les paul then you have issues.
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#18
[quote="ragingkitty3. Need single coils for tone? Then humbuckers won't cut it.

Its not a simple question of whether you go with one or the other. You really need to weigh the problems and go with the guitar that will give you less problems, but still meets your needs.[/QUOTE"]
I've played Teles and Daneletros when a string has gone on an SG or Les Paul towards the end of a set. A quick flick of EQs and tone controls and all's been well.
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#19
option B

93% of the people at the show wont notice the difference in tone. of the 7% that do notice, 5% is your band.
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The gods made heavy metal and it's never gonna die"
#20
I'd take A just because I'll adapt to the situation and my find guitar comfortable.
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#21
Quote by kolonelkadat
93% of the people at the show wont notice the difference in tone. of the 7% that do notice, 5% is your band.

that's a fair point, but wouldn't you notice that your tone is just not right? wouldn't that bother you? people say "nobody else notices the difference", forgetting that it's most important to them that their tone is just right for the very same reason.

of course a guitar that just doesn't feel comfortable to play can actually be potentially harmful because it can cause you to strain and lead to RSI, so i'd rather go with option B, but both options would bother me. this is an interesting hypothetical situation right here
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#22
Quote by Blompcube
that's a fair point, but wouldn't you notice that your tone is just not right? wouldn't that bother you? people say "nobody else notices the difference", forgetting that it's most important to them that their tone is just right for the very same reason.

sure! of course I would notice, and youre right it, probably would bother me IF (and thats a big if) I were playing for myself. In this case though Im playing for the people, not for me.
"When losers say it's over with you know that it's a lie
The gods made heavy metal and it's never gonna die"
#24
I'd go with B...but on a side note I watched this happen to somebody. Righty guitarist borrows a lefty and flips it for a "battle of the bands"...and won
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#26
well at the end of the day, if your a good player your going to pull the gig off nomatter what guitar.

i mean, sure i play better on my guitar, but if a friend calls me onto stage with his strat, well guess im rocking a strat. only real concern for me is soloing on a different scale length, which for me requires a bit more concentration to make sure im fretting perfectly in situations when my fingers are reaching.
#27
good feeling guitar beats anything hands down. if you dont like the feel of the guitar it will reflect in your playing and tone.
#28
Quote by kolonelkadat
sure! of course I would notice, and youre right it, probably would bother me IF (and thats a big if) I were playing for myself. In this case though Im playing for the people, not for me.

i think there's a bit more to it than that. i guess it works differently for different people but i find that if my tone isn't right it's a lot less inspiring and a little bit off putting even though i'm not playing for myself and the people i'm playing for might not notice, and it makes it a lot harder to give a good performance if your tone doesn't fit in to what you're playing, and people notice because you notice.. if that makes sense.

but of course this only really refers to extreme cases where you really can't get a suitable tone out of the gear that's available, otherwise you should be able to work with what is available to get a tone that works well enough that it won't bother you.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#29
Option A, I'm not fussy at all when it comes to how a guitar feels. I'll be uncomfortable for about 10 minutes until I get used to the guitar then I won't even notice what's wrong with it.
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#30
i would never leave my secondary at home
i never have at a gig
never will
BUT
if my secondary is out too
i pick B

P.S.
my secondary used to be an Epiphone ES-335 loaded with EMG OC1 SRO pups
Last edited by fenderfreak100 at Jun 23, 2011,
#31
Option A without a doubt, Sure it might not feel the best, but I'd rather man up and suck it up for an hour or so over a guitar that doesn't feel the best. Not that the crowd wouldn't care about tone, it's that the band tone would suffer.
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#32
Quote by kolonelkadat
option B

93% of the people at the show wont notice the difference in tone. of the 7% that do notice, 5% is your band.


91% of statistics are made up on the spot :P

depends on how bad the guitar feels