#1
I play upright bass more then bass guitar so I try to play bass guitar often to keep me balanced. So is there really any jazz songs, licks, or exercises that'll keep me spiffy at bass guitar that'll help me and improve my skill? Plus I am going to try out for jazz band in 2 years so I can get somewhat of a headstart.
Guitarist & Bassist
#3
haitian fight song by charles mingus
red clay by freddie hubbard
The Chicken by Jaco pastorius

and that should get you into a good position for jazz
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

Quote by AeolianWolf
absolutely what will said

Yay, my first compliment!
#4
Really, anything by jaco. He pioneered electric bass in the jazz world in a lot of ways.

But honestly, its stupid to make the distinction. I play both kinds of basses to, and everything I play on upright, I play on electric

Actually, I do simandl exercises on electric every day
#5
Jaco is good and by all means, learn some of his songs, but don't look to him to learn jazz or really get that feel. He has some good licks that you can use in any genre but i would say his songs are more of a fusion funk kind of genre more than jazz.

You really want to listen to and copy some of the greats, Paul Chambers, Ray Brown and
Ron Carter are the obvious ones but get into some bebop heads and get the feel really down, transpose some heads eg. black orpheus, au privave, straight no chaser, sugar, blue monk, mr pc.
I find that most of the pieces i do in that light swing bebop style are just sax or trumpet solos being transposed, charlie parker is the big one his solo's are amazingly creative (for example, donna lee was a solo originally), dizzie gilespie, miles davis, thelonious monk, really big artists with a big repertoire that you can choose from.
#6
Get going learning the heads and chord changes on some of the simpler better known pieces. Start with autumn leaves and blue moon. Work out how everything is working together and work out a walking line for the whole piece.

Get some books that begin with the basics such as ones with playalong cd's that go over II-V-I progressions and other ones. Begin at the bottom and work/Walk() your way up.
Yamaha TRB1006
Fender MIA jazz bass
Hora Hybrid double bass
Hartke lh 500
Ev 606L
Epiphone les paul
#7
Quote by FatalGear41
If you're looking for upright Jazz bass guidance, there's no greater sage than Ron Carter. So choose your weapon and get to practicing!

http://www.bassbooks.com/shopping/shopdisplayproducts.asp?id=19&cat=Carter%2C+Ron



http://www.bassbooks.com/shopping/shopexd.asp?id=63&bc=no

And I will raise you one Ray Brown. After some time with them, get a good Real Book, find few people who want to jam and start playing with a small group. Nothing is going to improve your jazz playing than playing with others. One of the keys as a jazz bass player is to learn to listen to what the other instruments are doing around you and support them as well as serve the song and the music.
#8
Everyone has thrown out some great suggetions already. One I would throw out is check out Jamerson. He was the house bassist for Motown and was originally a Jazz musican, and most of his motown tunes keep that same Jazzy chromatic style. And all of his older stuff 1950's ish were done on an up- right 'my-guy, heat wave, ect..." So a guy who played both "damn well might I add" is definetly going to help IMO. Plus he's a fun to listen to!

Another one you may want to check out is Carol Kaye, she all over the place... she played with everyone from the Beach Boys to Ray Charles. But at heart she admits she will always be a jazz musican.
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
#10
I play bass in a orchestra so I play bass guitar for fun and plus when I'm in my band I play guitar and if the bassist is gone, I can take over. I just thought if dorchestra doesn't work out I can vacate to jazz band if I don't go to jazz band, it's good to be able to play bass guitar. thanks for all the suggestions! It helps alot!
Guitarist & Bassist
#11
peg by steely dan. anything by mingus or ray brown (lesser known but really good). some count basie is fun.
My name is Greg, use it.

Sarcastic

Angry

Hopeful
#12
Quote by thebassiestbass
...why have none of us mentioned esperanza yet...


Honestly, I respect her for being brilliant but she takes a real non-traditional approach to jazz and I don't think that's always the way to go when you are just starting out in jazz bass playing. Great for inspiration once you've got the jist of things but a difficult road map if your just trying to get the hang of playing jazz as a bassist.
#13
Quote by anarkee
Honestly, I respect her for being brilliant but she takes a real non-traditional approach to jazz and I don't think that's always the way to go when you are just starting out in jazz bass playing. Great for inspiration once you've got the jist of things but a difficult road map if your just trying to get the hang of playing jazz as a bassist.


True, but Ill raise you this. She is a more relevant and influential artist in todays jazz scene than any other bassist Ive seen mentioned in this thread, and for that, it would be valuable for a bassist of any skill to look into her playing. Especially since a lot of it isnt that heavy

But who the hell cares. If it sounds good it is good
#14
Quote by anarkee
Honestly, I respect her for being brilliant but she takes a real non-traditional approach to jazz and I don't think that's always the way to go when you are just starting out in jazz bass playing.


I agree, she bends the genre abit, almost like how rock alternative bent rock. Jazz Alternative? I am not starting out, but I never play much jazz.
Guitarist & Bassist