#1
I've decided that in order to expand my chord knowledge and my music theory, I'm going to construct them and work out the fingering myself with the use of a chord sheet that goes something like this:

Chord Type-------------------Symbol-----Scale Notes-----Examples (C Chords)
Major----------------------------Maj.-----------1,3,5----------------C = C, E, G
Minor----------------------------etc.-------------etc.---------------------etc.
Seventh
Major Seventh
Minor Seventh
Minor Major Seventh
Suspended 4th
Seventh Suspended 4th
Sixth
Minor Sixth
Ninth
Added Ninth
Minor 9th
Augmented
Augmented Seventh
Diminished
Diminished Seventh
Half Diminished Seventh
Eleventh
Minor Eleventh
Thirteenth
Minor 13th
Sixth Added Ninth
Minor Sixth Added Ninth

So, is there any chord I'm missing?
Could anyone give me the various suspended second scale notes as above?

Thanks!
Last edited by conor-figgy at Jun 23, 2011,
#4
Quote by Martindecorum
^ sus2 and sus4

Nah, sus4 is there and Calibos just gave me sus 2.
#6
add6, -5 and 7-5 (i don't quite know what those are, just saw them on a chord site)
Last edited by Dr. V at Jun 23, 2011,
#8
Quote by conor-figgy
Same as sixth? 1,3,5,6


You're right, my bad...
#10
do you know how each of these chords would sound, and how each of them would be used? if you don't, that's a bit of a problem. in that case, you have little reason to be doing what you're doing.

you're basically learning grammar for a language you know very little vocabulary in. (i surmise -- i obviously can't make that assertion with no basis). either way, you're almost certainly going beyond what you know - i guarantee you're going in over your head with this project, though.

i'm not going to stop you, obviously, because i can't. instead, however, you'd be far better off learning to construct these individual chords from scales, and understanding their use in terms of functional harmony, rather than using formula that are, in this context, completely independent of everything else. theoretically, you're missing A LOT of chords there. maj9. maj11. maj9(#11). maj13. not only altered dominants, as jayx said, but altered chords in general. and this is something you're far better off learning to construct as you need it, rather than using independent formulas.

knowing that a 1 3 5 is major is great and all, but knowing that a 9(#11) is 1 3 5 b7 9 #11 (and its less often built on the tonic, so it won't always be a 1) won't help you much if you don't understand its use.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jun 23, 2011,
#11
+1 to the Wolf-miester

My advice would be to learn all standard major, minor and diminished chords and their respective 7ths and inversions and learn how to write chord progressions with these.

Too many people over-look inversions and miss out on so much, it makes me sad
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jun 23, 2011,
#12
@AeolianWolf + @griffRG7321

Ok guys, you obviously know much more that I so I'll take your advice and go about it how you both said!

#13
Quote by conor-figgy
@AeolianWolf + @griffRG7321

Ok guys, you obviously know much more that I so I'll take your advice and go about it how you both said!



great! once you get the foundations, you won't need to be hung up on memorizing chord formulas. you'll understand function and know precisely when to use a certain chord.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#14
Quote by AeolianWolf
great! once you get the foundations, you won't need to be hung up on memorizing chord formulas. you'll understand function and know precisely when to use a certain chord.

Would you mind giving me the first three things I should learn? Then I'll know where I'm going once I've started, hopefully
#15
intervals, scales, and keys. you seem to know the very basics of chords already, so it's been excluded.

once you know what a key is, learn how to build chords within it. then you'll know precisely what to do. eventually, through experience, listening, study, and application, the more advanced chords will manifest themselves in your composition, and you'll know precisely when to use which because you'll understand its function.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#16
Quote by AeolianWolf
intervals, scales, and keys. you seem to know the very basics of chords already, so it's been excluded.

once you know what a key is, learn how to build chords within it. then you'll know precisely what to do. eventually, through experience, listening, study, and application, the more advanced chords will manifest themselves in your composition, and you'll know precisely when to use which because you'll understand its function.

Thanks so much, appreciate it!