#1
Hey guys - beginner guitarist here.

I was just playing up and down my fretboard, playing through my scales and chords and just generally playing around when I came across this chord progression:

e|-6-5-3 3
B|-3-3-3 4
G|-3-3-3 3
D|-3-3-3 5
A|-x-x-x 3
E|-x-x-x x

First of all what are the first three chords called? I know that the last chord played is a barred Am7 atleast...

It also sounded good played like this:

e|-6-5-3--3
B|-3-3-3--4
G|-3-3-3--3
D|-x-x-x-- 5
A|-x-x-x-- 3
E|-x-x-x-- x

Please excuse the sporadic spacing of the chords I'm just trying my best to line up the notes!

Also what would be needed to finish off this chord progression - as when it is it played it sounds "incomplete" to me?

Thanks in advance for your help!
Last edited by Harry Kershaw at Jun 24, 2011,
#2
I was playing something like that the other day. It kind of had a jazzy/soul kind of sound. I don't know what those chords are, but if you play them into a tuner it will tell you. I don't know how to finish it though, maybe try a bluesy turn around or something to tie it up.
#3
Quote by Harry Kershaw

e|-6-5-3 3
B|-3-3-3 4
G|-3-3-3 3
D|-3-3-3 5
A|-x-x-x 3
E|-x-x-x x

First of all what are the first three chords called? I know that the last chord played is a barred A7 atleast...


Bb/F, Bbmaj7/F, Bb6/F...your final chord is a Cm7.

Quote by Harry Kershaw

It also sounded good played like this:

e|-6-5-3--3
B|-3-3-3--4
G|-3-3-3--3
D|-x-x-x-- 5
A|-x-x-x-- 3
E|-x-x-x-- x


You're eliminating the F from the bass of the Bb chords and making the lowest note Bb, which is a good move. Inverting a chord to have it's 5th in the bass voice is unstable. This also makes your third chord a Gm/Bb.

Quote by Harry Kershaw

Also what would be needed to finish off this chord progression - as when it is it played it sounds "incomplete" to me?


After the Cm7, try going to F then back to Bb.

When denoting chords on the forum, use the code tags, they'll evenly space everything.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#4
Gm7 Gm9 Gm7 Cm7

I read it as being in Em, and the Gm being the minor 3, and the Cm being the minor 6.

EDIT: bugger...i'm not thinking straight tonight... ignore me
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Last edited by Banjocal at Jun 24, 2011,
#5
Quote by DrakeTheOne
I was playing something like that the other day. It kind of had a jazzy/soul kind of sound. I don't know what those chords are, but if you play them into a tuner it will tell you. I don't know how to finish it though, maybe try a bluesy turn around or something to tie it up.


Either your conception of how to name chords is totally wrong, or you're using a pretty unusual tuner.
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#6
Quote by Instrumetal
Either your conception of how to name chords is totally wrong, or you're using a pretty unusual tuner.


it tells me what note it is and whether it's sharp, flat, and such. it doesn't give me anything like Abm7, but it would tell me that it's an A flat. From there I just pick the rest out by sound.
also I use http://chordfind.com/ to figure out the exact chord.
#7
Thanks for the help guys!

Also, @ Soviet Ska - when you listed those first 3 chords did you name them based on the e B G version then the e B G D version? Also, here: "Bbmaj7/F, Bb6/F" would that make Fmaj7 and F6?

Can you guys explain why the chords sound good (well...more like don't sound terrible) when played like so? The only theory I know of chord progressions is I IV V and as far as I can see these chords are not part of a I IV and V progression?

Also... How are the first 3 chords F/Fmaj7/F6?

I thought the characteristic of an F chord were the notes F, A and C? Looking at my noted out fretboard and good old pen and paper work the notes I get for the first 3 chords (with the F note) are:

F, A#, D, A#
F, A#, D, A and
F, A#, D, G.

I have never heard of an F chord with those notes (I am a beginner though!)

I realise that I may be being a pain right here with these questions - it's just that I'm so used to playing the basic chords and their shape in barre chords and now I've played a chord progression that doesn't sound awful without them I cannot make head nor tail of it - and I would very much like to understand what is going on!
Last edited by Harry Kershaw at Jun 24, 2011,
#8
Quote by Harry Kershaw
Also, @ Soviet Ska - when you listed those first 3 chords did you name them based on the e B G version then the e B G D version? Also, here: "Bbmaj7/F, Bb6/F" would that make Fmaj7 and F6?


Bb/F, Bbmaj7/F, Bb6/F, Cm7 for the four-note voicings.

Bb, Bbmaj7, Gm/Bb, Cm7 for the three-note voicings.

No, just because they have an F in the bass does not make them an F chord. Your Bbmaj7/F is spelled: F Bb D A. An Fmaj7 would be F A C E. Look up chord construction and chord inversions if you want further enlightenment on the topic. There are plenty of lessons on UG and many on the rest of the internet.

Quote by Harry Kershaw

Can you guys explain why the chords sound good (well...more like don't sound terrible) when played like so? The only theory I know of chord progressions is I IV V and as far as I can see these chords are not I IV and V?


Yes. These chords are diatonic (meaning they fit perfectly in a key with no accidentals.) Your first progression sounds good because you're just altering a Bb as you go, meaning most of the notes are carried from chord to chord, until you hit the Cm7 which is still in key. Your second progression is stronger as it loses the second inversion chords (the Bb/F thing) and adds more harmonic motion (read: interest) yet keeps the whole progression in the key of Bb major. However, what it really lacks is a strong ending. The V in I - IV - V is placed last because it creates a lot of tension, which makes your ear want to hear the I chord (which resolves the tension.) Let's Roman Numeralize your progression (the three-string one):

Bb - Bbmaj7 - Gm/Bb - Cm7
I - I - vi - ii

You'll need a stronger ending than that, which is why I suggested F.

Bb - Bbmaj7 - Gm/Bb - Cm7 - F
I - I - vi - ii - V

The ii - V at the end is much like the IV - V you've heard so much about. The ii in a major key acts the same as the IV, i.e. the ii sets up the V very nicely. The V will make your ears scream for the Bb to return, which you can allow by repeating the progression.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.